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I start by breaking down the bike completely, brake components and all. I strip off all old paint and decals and sand the frame with 220 grit paper then smooth it over with steel wool. Clean the frame with engine de-greaser let sit for a day. Tape off all undesired openings: Head Tube Bottom Bracket seat post, and dropouts. I apply one thin coat of ...


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Because you are only buying 1 of each component. A bicycle manufacture buys thousands of the same component and thus gets huge discounts. Sometimes, some components on a bicycle are the bicycle manufacture's own product, such as hubs, bars, etc. These are not for sale to you. However, building your own bike allows you to select exactly the components you ...


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Economy of scale, bulk discounts, underpaid Chinese laborers. One of those. RE: building your own PC. Yes you can sometimes save money doing that too (on higher end rigs) but if you just want 'a cheap PC' it would be almost impossible to top a pre-built Acer or Dell...and literally impossible if you factor in things like Windows licenses.


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I have built a few bikes for less than already built cost. It takes a lot of time and research to do it. If you add the cost of the personal time, it has to be more a labor of love than a financial gain. It took over a year and hours of looking on line, E Bay, Craigs List and retailers for the best deals on individual components and buying only when I ...


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The sale price falls between what the customer is prepared to pay and cost plus. (If the cost plus is more than what the customer will accept, it's not worth doing business). Complete bikes are a highly competitive market, and this drives the price down to very close to cost plus pricing. It's the high volume, low profit part of the business. The ...


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You don't get bulk buying discounts for each part. You have to get retail packaging instead of bulk packaging. Certain parts are only made for OEM bikes. You have to put it together (and possibly get the frame prepped at the bike shop), which can add labor costs (since the work is not done in say, Taiwan).


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Do you mean this rack? On the linked page it says that the rack will fit a 700c bike. Also I see that there are two holes at the bottom (dropout) mount, that would make it easy to use something like a repair strap to raise the rack if that proves necessary. Use a bolt through both holes so that the repair strap and rack can't move under load. If you're ...


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I'm not sure about building a wheel using just the screw slot – I think you could probably do it, but I suspect that it would be a painful process. If you tried it, you'd want to be sure that the spoke lengths were exactly right. Much of the strength of the spoke comes from engaging with the threads in the wider section of the nipple that is on the inside of ...


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34/50 is a standard combination, so 34/48 should work without problems. Friction shifters just make it easier to overshift and trim on the fly.


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Well, you don't have to… That said, Tektro makes some very nice and inexpensive levers – both drop bar levers (RL340) and interrupter levers (RL720) which are much more effective than suicide levers. At the very least, I would take off the suicide levers, I've never had good luck with them. The problem that I had with suicide levers was that they had so much ...


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If you're friction shifting go with the Dia Compe. They have a ratcheting mechanism in them originally developed by SunTour to counteract the spring in the derailleur. This gives them a very even feel in both directions - you apply as much pressure to upshift as to downshift. They also look better on older bikes. The Shimano shifters OTOH rely purely on ...


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Check out the IRD Defiant wide range double crankset http://store.somafab.com/irdwicorodoc.html) It has a 94bcd which allows it to run 46x30 rings. Combine that with a 12-27 cassette or freewheel and you'll have plenty of range. Going to a triple presents a few problems: They don't shift as well as a double. You have a short cage rear derailleur so max ...


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Tsunoda are/were a mass manufacturer in Japan somewhat similar to Schwinn in the USA. Most of the bikes they produced were low end though they did make some mid-to-upper end models (I once had a Tsunoda made Lotus branded frame from the early 80s). I believe the brand is still around in the Japanese market but now mostly making folding bikes. Your bike ...



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