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14

Cables will stretch over time, but they won't become elastic. They're made of twisted strands of metal, and metal isn't generally known for its elasticity. This sounds to me like your brake pads are shot. When they become spongy and glazed, you can squeeze your brake lever quite far and feel like little pressure is being applied. Get thee to a bikeshoppery. ...


8

I wouldn't say that a single broken strand on a new brake cable would render the bike "totally unsafe to ride," but if it is an option you should bring it back to the shop and have them replace it. This might be a sign that whoever put this bike together or inspected it for sale doesn't have a very thorough shop ethic. If they were careless enough to install ...


8

The problem that you'll likely run into is the stop in the lever/shifter ends. I'm not aware of any systems that will accept bare cable at this end: If you wanted to pair your spool of wire with some sort of crimper (or go all out with some sort of mold/press), you could make your own - but investing $3,000 - $30,000 on some machine that melts metal on ...


7

What are the reasons of the other cabling schemes? Most Cyclocross bikes will route all the rear cables along the top of the top tube. In a cyclocross race, you will get off and shoulder your bike, the cables would get in the way on the underside of the top tube. Many CX bikes have a flat bottom top tube as well for easier shouldering. Routing the ...


7

Normally you replace a cable when it becomes too badly rusted, or the cable inside begins to break. The first condition you notice because the cable does not move freely, and the second you notice because the brake levers "give" (and don't bounce back) when you squeeze them hard. If not rusty, a set of cables can easily last 10-20 years. In your case it ...


6

What is happening is that you have enough force in your hand to move the whole mechanism towards one direction overcoming the failure point, but the spring in the derailleur doesn't have the required force. As you pedal (and ride) vibration helps momentarily reducing friction and allowing the spring to pull back, so it finally shifts. The most common cause ...


6

Sad to say, not worth the effort! However, if you are a bulk user of cable outer then you can invest in a big reel of the stuff (obviously genuine Shimano) and some Shimano cable cutters (TL-CT-10). Note the price is wrong: http://www.madison.co.uk/productinfo.aspx?catref=6Y1+9801 However, order by Madison part code from your LBS and get the brake cable ...


6

Those end-caps are quite reusable. If you take a pair of pliers and squeeze it gently so that the flattened portion opens up you can then slide it back onto the cable. Using the pliers you can then re-crimp it on the cable. Although it looks ugly and everyone will know that you are too cheap to buy a 10c end-cap. A little bit of superglue placed at the end ...


6

It's not a given that the full-length housing is lower friction. I suspect that a well-done exposed cable scheme is lower friction than a full housing. Especially for indexed shifters, the cable housing changes effective length with tension and temperature changes. The exposed cable scheme has much less flex and hence more precision shifting. The ...


6

Cutting cables and housing is a bit of a pain in the ass (especially regular spiral housing for brakes). A Dremel with cutting disc or something like the Park Tool CN-10 is useful to cut the housing, along with a small file / punch to make sure that the hole is clear and smooth. The rules for running cables are here and here, along with some directions for ...


5

I know an answer has been selected, but I wanted to post this here for future reference. First - the common name for that type part is a "straddle cable" or a "link wire" depending on the variations or the manufacturer. Second - my primary source (after my LBS) for less-common parts, especially parts for older bikes or the bike-shaped objects the ...


5

Amazon or your local bike shop. Here's a double ended (you can cut into one or two depending on length you need) http://www.amazon.com/BRAKE-STRADDLE-CABLE-ACTION-2-ENDS/dp/B0047MDL8K/ref=sr_1_7?ie=UTF8&qid=1337570069&sr=8-7 Enjoy!


5

I believe one reason is more "stiffness" in the cable. Cable housing typically contracts when the cable is contracted. That's why Nokon also builds bicycle cable housing now. With The frame attachments, you get almost half a meter less housing that may contract. This could lead to crisper shift and brake feel.


5

A long pull lever (i.e. for V-brakes, mountain mechanical discs) pulls the cable about twice as long (but about half as hard) as a short pull lever (caliper, cantilever, road discs). This is determined by the distance between where the cable ends and where the lever pivots. According to this thread, its significantly lower for short pull than for long pull ...


4

Given what you are describing, it is likely that you are looking in the wrong place for your solution. Cables will stretch a small, but finite amount. The do not flex to the level you are describing. That would break them first. Brake levers, calipers, and pads can allow some spring effect into the system, but that typically doesn't creep in over time. It ...


4

Cables will actually "work harden" slightly and become very slightly less elastic as they age. If they really do get "stretchy" it's because several strands have broken and the cable is near failure. Of course, many other things bend/stretch in the cable path, one being the brake calipers. As the bushings get worn and the brakes abused over time they ...


4

I put the cable in, find a length that's 'approximate enough', and crimp the cable end onto the cable before I clamp it into the derailleur. This will prevent the end from fraying, like you say, and becoming difficult to deal with. It will get flattened under the derailleur clamp, but this can't be avoided. If you don't crimp the end in first (or leaving it ...


4

That looks to me like an overtightened bolt. See how the cable has spread out under the bolt? That means more strands have probably been damaged. The problem is not that one strand has broken, but that more strands will break in short order. So yes, do something about it soon. If you're lucky you'll be able to wind the barrel adjuster on the brake lever in ...


4

You could maybe cut it where it is not frayed and put a cap if the slack is long enough. Or you could put a piece of duct tape just to avoid the fraying from reaching a place interfere with the derailleur. Or you could try to gather the frayed-out strings and put a cap anyway Or if you really don't like it, you can change the cable completely though it is ...


4

In general, designers will seek to achieve the shortest possible cable routes while minimizing the number and severity of turns. And off-road bikes will be designed with consideration of problems due to running through underbrush, etc. Assuming a standard diamond frame: Under the top tube is generally a good place for the rear brake and derailer cables ...


4

You are correct. This is different than "regular" cables. On regular cables you pick the end you want and cut off the other. Thats because the connection on the cut-off end is usually a clamp. You run the cable under a screw/nut and tighten it down. Then you just put a cable crimp on the end to protect the cut cable However, your internal hub cable is ...


4

Lever throw is how much the lever moves in total. Cable slack is how slack the cable is, ie. how much you have to pull before the brake pads start moving. Park Tool says: Squeeze lever to test caliper brake. Adjust lever modulation setting by moving pads inward or outward from rotor by using both pad-adjusting knobs. To maintain the 2:1 ratio, turn the ...


3

First off, carefully check the rear brake and compare it to the front. In particular, the "noodle" of V-brakes is quite fragile and can get bent and crimped. Or it can simply get bumped and moved out of place. Squeeze the brake lever (on the handlebar) and then let go -- does the cable (as it exits the lever) go "limp"? If so, the brake lever itself is ...


3

If you are going for less maintenance, you may just want to go with full housing. My exposed cables (on my top tube) get water, mud, grime and need to be replaced at the end of each season of cross racing. Extra maintenance during to keep them lubed up. I would go full housing and use six of these: ...


3

The problem may be in in your cables. If the cables are dragging inside the housing the pads may not fully release. You can isolate the problem by disconnecting the cable from the brake. Then manually cycle the arm on the caliper. If it doesn't drag or stick after you release it, the problem is the cable. You can try lubing the cables it may help. It may ...


3

It appears that someone has come up with a solution to use vbrake noodles to re-route the STI shifter cables with some success. http://thecrazyrandonneur.wordpress.com/2012/05/08/how-to-have-a-large-handlebar-bag-with-sti-shifters/


3

The best solution is probably to move to either a different shifter setup like newer shimano 105/ultegra or SRAM (with cable routing under the handlebars) or to a barend setup like most randos employ. I know this isn't your preferred solution, but it's probably the easiest and most effective. If you mess with the routing/length on your shift cables, you're ...


3

I have successfully used A tiny bit of epoxy glue. Another option is a bit of tin soldering wire: give it a couple of tight loops around the end of the cable then squash it with pliers. Tin is soft enough to be defformed around the cable without deforming the cable. Yet another option is to use an actual soldering iron to cover the very last centimeter of ...


3

You can buy cable caps separately, they're actually meant to be crimped on so you can fix them with a crimper or pliers. I know Park tools do something which is basically a really sharp wire cutter, should prevent fraying in the first place. This tool is showing on their site now but I have one (bought many years ago) which looks a bit different. You ...


3

I believe Sheldon wrote this before there was brake specific compressionless housing available on the market. My understanding is that brake specific compressionless housing is reinforced with Kevlar, not plastic, and it has certainly been rigorously tested to work as expected. The folks I know that run compressionless housing on their mechanical disc brake ...



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