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6

Mountain bikers regularly run these low cadences for very short periods, often at much higher power output. The issue as to causing damage to knees is more about the duration of the climb and how strong your stabiliser muscles are. (Too much time mushing causes chronic overuse problems, while weak stabiliser muscles can allow injury to happen), however they ...


5

The only way to be sure is to measure. You can use an app such as Strava during the ride, then look at it's analysis later. It will show you how fast you were going at each point, and also gives an approximation of your power output. We don't know what algorithm or assumptions it uses to calculate the power, but since it uses just one algorithm you can ...


4

The general advice is that we should aim at 90 for an average cadence, and pushing slower than that can produce knee pain and injuries, and back pain and injuries. However, everyone has their own best cadence. For example, I have not raced and find 110rpm is good for me on a flat-ish ride. My brother who has raced stays at around 120rpm on the same terrain. ...


3

You will not lose climbing strength if you work on your cadence; they are two different aspects of riding. My recommendation to increase cadence range is the following: 1) On a slight incline, choose a gear that is medium effort. 2) Over 30 seconds, increase your cadence until you are at your maximum smooth cadence (no bouncing). If your effort is too ...


2

A simple way to think of cadence is the higher, the more cardio. The lower the cadence the less used cardio and more power used in the legs. If you're used to a lower cadence, it means you aren't used to working your cardio as much. Anywhere near the 80 range is a perfect balanced work out for your muscles and cardio. Plus, too low of a cadence can bad for ...


2

Understand that the concern is not generally things like a muscle or tendon tear that can occur with, eg, extreme weightlifting -- off-road bikers might be susceptible to that sort of injury, but not a road biker. Rather, the concern is the injury that may be done to joint surfaces and structures due to repeated force, above some "tolerable" level, applied ...


2

Your options to reduce the force on your knees are to reduce bike + rider weight or get lower gearing. If you have a standard road bike cassette, there are climbing cassettes that will reduce the gearing slightly (around 10% or so). Is it dangerous to your knees? Well, that depends on your personal physiology, how much force you are pushing, how much to you ...


1

Low cadences are generally putting a lot more strain on the knees, as you're relying on power, given the gear ratios I suspect another issue. I would work on your fitness on flatter terrain and build up to hills. Start within your cardio range and stay in it, do this regularly 3-4 times per week if possible. The problem stems from fitness/strength which ...



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