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6

Mountain bikers regularly run these low cadences for very short periods, often at much higher power output. The issue as to causing damage to knees is more about the duration of the climb and how strong your stabiliser muscles are. (Too much time mushing causes chronic overuse problems, while weak stabiliser muscles can allow injury to happen), however they ...


5

I also think the answer is "it depends", but for slightly different reasons to Daniel. I think it depends on why you're cycling. If you are training, then measuring cadence can definitely be useful. In fact, there are training programmes that are based around cadence. (You're basically looking for a high value, and a steady value.) Otherwise, the ...


3

No. You're correct that there is extra cost and hassle involved in collecting cadence. The question you need to answer for yourself is: does the benefit outweigh the cost. Since you don't seem to see any benefits, the answer is obviously no. You should buy things when they fill a need, rather than buying things because they are available. As far as ...


3

It's only worth going up a notch if it's a feature you'll use. Use: I use cadence all the time. It's the primary information I use on a bike computer while I'm riding. My speed? As fast as it should be for the grade, wind, and my condition. My distance? Not home yet. The efficiency of my muscles and mechanical structure through the knees? That's ...


2

Summary: I used it a lot for a while getting started. Now I never look at it. Cadence was one of the primary features I was looking for when getting a computer for my road bike. I bought one of the nice Bontrager wireless models where the speed sensor and cadence sensor are all in one piece on the left chainstay. (not advocating wireless, it's just what I ...


2

I found driod support for these kinds of sensors to be patchy at best and not yet what I consider ready for prime time. Manufacturer provided software is often crap, third party often don't support the hardware. Many claims of features and devices suppported apply to the iPhone versions only. I current use Digifit iCardio on my driod phone with Scorche ...


2

Understand that the concern is not generally things like a muscle or tendon tear that can occur with, eg, extreme weightlifting -- off-road bikers might be susceptible to that sort of injury, but not a road biker. Rather, the concern is the injury that may be done to joint surfaces and structures due to repeated force, above some "tolerable" level, applied ...


2

Your options to reduce the force on your knees are to reduce bike + rider weight or get lower gearing. If you have a standard road bike cassette, there are climbing cassettes that will reduce the gearing slightly (around 10% or so). Is it dangerous to your knees? Well, that depends on your personal physiology, how much force you are pushing, how much to you ...


1

Low cadences are generally putting a lot more strain on the knees, as you're relying on power, given the gear ratios I suspect another issue. I would work on your fitness on flatter terrain and build up to hills. Start within your cardio range and stay in it, do this regularly 3-4 times per week if possible. The problem stems from fitness/strength which ...


1

It depends on the unit. Cadence is good to have, if you want to do any sort of training, but cadence is often poorly implemented. In fact, I'm not aware of ANY good computers with cadence at present. The old Cateye Micro was excellent, but it's not been available for 15 years or so. If you get a unit with cadence you want to be sure it has a SEPARATE ...


1

Basing workload or technique on soreness is a poor indicator of what is going on. You could have bad pedaling technique and never feel it or have great technique with no fitness and feel sore right away. It's likely that you are not using your calf muscles as much when you cycle as when you do stairs. Stair running is a great way to train most of the ...


1

Android can just about handle multiple BTLE sensors simultaneously but there are still some low level Android bugs that make it rather unreliable. The coding for is also a good bit more complex to get working than the single sensor case. I have support in my app IpBike via a beta version of IpSensorMan At this point in time if you were getting new then an ...



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