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24

Always "riding your hardest" is called "junk miles" because it is not possible to always ride your hardest. The biggest performance gains come from more targeted and disciplined riding (as suggested by mattnz). To climb your steep hills (I assume these are relatively short, steep climbs, not a mountain pass) you need to work on developing high power over ...


20

Left to their own devices many will cycle at a cadence (a measure of how fast you spin) that approximates cadence of walking, an RPM of about 50-60. So the fact you prefer a slower leg speed is not unusual. Trained cyclists will often have a cadence between 80-110 and up to 200 for sprints (track). Is there something bad about a cycling style in ...


12

I get the impression when you hit the road its full out 110% effort for the length of the ride. I would suggest from the "lungs burning" description that you are over training and exercising above your anaerobic threshold. You don;t say how often or how far you ride. First up - your cadence is way too low and you risk damaging you knees. Go for a series ...


11

The only way to be sure is to measure. You can use an app such as Strava during the ride, then look at it's analysis later. It will show you how fast you were going at each point, and also gives an approximation of your power output. We don't know what algorithm or assumptions it uses to calculate the power, but since it uses just one algorithm you can ...


10

This is really a pretty complex question. Without knowing where you read about "steady cadence being a good thing" or what the author meant it is hard to evaluate this statement, but this SE.bicycles answer presents data showing that riders don't ride at a steady cadence. Rather, they alter their cadence according to conditions of the ride, the level of ...


9

Time for some Pee You need to consider PACING yourself. Use something like strava to log your rides and see your improvements over time, because it never feels like you're getting faster at the time. I did a hill last weekend in 8 minutes that used to take me 15 minutes, 9 months ago. Didn't feel like it at the time. PEERS - riding alone is nice and quiet ...


8

This subject is about the performance on a bicycle Cycling is aerobic exercise in nature. 1) Fast twitch vs. Slow twitch muscle In high gear (low cadence and higher force per pedal stroke for the same output, in comparison to higher cadence) you recruit more of your fast-twitch muscle, and thus you are doing more anaerobic (not aerobic) exercise. It's OK ...


6

The power you transfer to the bike is proportional to the force on the pedals multiplied by the cadence. There's some upper limit to how much force you can apply, but you can spin more quickly. Sometimes if I'm overtaken by another bike (travelling faster than I am) I've found that I can keep up with that bike, if I change down into a lower gear and then ...


5

Through personal experience, I have found that the higher cadence method will always get me ahead of the group of commuters at the lights. I sometimes see the standing grinders but by the first downstroke of their crank arm, I am already gaining much more acceleration. The grinders are also wobbling all over the place because their centre of mass is much ...


4

Another theory that does not seem to be adopted by the bicycle community. Individual racers and race teams go with a steady cadence and output. If you have two riders trying dump a third the 2 riders will take turns bursting and falling back. Eventually the 3rd rider cannot keep up with the burst and is left. If bursting was as (or more) efficient than ...


4

David - how does it feel to you when you're on your bike and try doing exactly that? Biomechanically, you'll be stressing your muscles to a higher peak level, and then a brief respite. I imagine your overall power output will be lower over a reasonable distance. If you pedal fast then coast for a bit then pedal then coast - I think you'll look like a ...


3

I know Im a little late for this posting but this is the first time I came across such question. I do own a Trek Lime, purchased back in 2007. This is a fully automatic bicycle. It has 3 speeds a front hub dynamo (speed sensor), a shifter module-solenoid (computer) under the center frame, and the 3 speed auto-shifter hub in the rear wheel. As far as I know ...


3

Having considered between unsing my android phone as a bike computer and buying dedicated computer, I noticed some points that could serve you. Using cell phone: You need a bike mount to be able to look at the data while you ride, moreso for navigation, and they are somehow bulky, just like a cell phone compared to the dedicated bike gps you mention. ...


3

In addition to the other great answers, slow cadence encourages, for some riders, standing cycling, particularly when going up hills. This places a great deal of stress on the drivetrain, and in particular the bottom bracket. Whether you stand or sit, though, a slower cadence is simply trading speed for force - the effort is the same, but the stress on the ...


2

It is far more efficient to cycle at a steady cadence suitable for the terrain and gearing used. In fact this attempt to maintain cadence and maximise efficiency is the reason bikes have gears. Varying the cadence is going to put stress and strain on your muscles, joints and cardio vascular system. This could be your aim (with the exception of stressing ...


2

As the Nuvinci system has been mentioned in other answers, I'll mention one more. SRAM makes the Automatix hub now. It's a 2 speed system (ratios 1:1, 1:1.37) with a centrifugal clutch. There's no manual shifting possible and no cables involved.


1

30 cadence is too low and will tend to fatigue the legs more. Pick a lower gear. You don't need to be a pro to climb like a pro. And there are other videos on youtube. As for getting better at climbing - climb more (and at a higher cadence).


1

Looks like an older generation Sigma Sport bike computer with that has its silk screened logos worn away. The two 7-segment displays and small alphanumeric display in the center are their trade mark and as you noticed, the mount is Sigma. The second set of connections in the mount is for cadence sensor that is sold separately. Over the years, Sigma has ...


1

SIGMA make a connecting pod with USB connection to the PC. It takes the bike computer via twist lock. They have their own data suite for reading and archiving data from the bike computer. You should find it on their website.


1

The answer is probably the combination of standing up and high cadence. I assume that when you say acceleration you mean hard and short burst of effort. The maximum power in that short period of time will be produced by the fast twitch muscle fibres type, (i.e. when you stand up, low cadence). This type of fibres work anaerobically so you can only sustain ...


1

Get a power meter and see what output you are getting at various rpm / loads. There is a big difference of 120rpm at 200w or 600w. This relationship will most likely not be linear. 150 rpm seems much too high, but everyone is different. I personally find great power at 105-120. Timing yourself or using HR can be a measure as well, but power is the only ...


1

Best thing is to just get a Garmin that has bluetooth or wifi (1000,820,etc...) It is the best way to get the sensors that the phone apps lack. The new edge 520 is $300 and does all that the phone apps can do + has cadence and heartrate and speed (won't do turn by turn nav, but it does have maps). Plus there are problems with beating your phone on the ...


1

I'm also a Windows Phone user but I'm still on Windows 8.1 until my phone gets the update. The app I use for recording my rides is Straza Mate, which is another unofficial Strava connected app. As far as I know, it doesn't support heart rate or cadence/speed sensors. I mostly using it for logging miles on commutes as I'm not really concerned about ...


1

I also have a windows phone but not on the latest version 10 OS - so cannot install or comment on the Garmin Connect app. The closest app to Strava is something called Striver. It saves GPX to the phone and for seamless integration and upload to Strava - you have to pay a small fee for the app. If I am out for a quick ride of 1hr to 1.5hrs my phone is fine ...



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