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24

Always "riding your hardest" is called "junk miles" because it is not possible to always ride your hardest. The biggest performance gains come from more targeted and disciplined riding (as suggested by mattnz). To climb your steep hills (I assume these are relatively short, steep climbs, not a mountain pass) you need to work on developing high power over ...


12

I get the impression when you hit the road its full out 110% effort for the length of the ride. I would suggest from the "lungs burning" description that you are over training and exercising above your anaerobic threshold. You don;t say how often or how far you ride. First up - your cadence is way too low and you risk damaging you knees. Go for a series ...


10

This is really a pretty complex question. Without knowing where you read about "steady cadence being a good thing" or what the author meant it is hard to evaluate this statement, but this SE.bicycles answer presents data showing that riders don't ride at a steady cadence. Rather, they alter their cadence according to conditions of the ride, the level of ...


9

Time for some Pee You need to consider PACING yourself. Use something like strava to log your rides and see your improvements over time, because it never feels like you're getting faster at the time. I did a hill last weekend in 8 minutes that used to take me 15 minutes, 9 months ago. Didn't feel like it at the time. PEERS - riding alone is nice and quiet ...


5

I know Im a little late for this posting but this is the first time I came across such question. I do own a Trek Lime, purchased back in 2007. This is a fully automatic bicycle. It has 3 speeds a front hub dynamo (speed sensor), a shifter module-solenoid (computer) under the center frame, and the 3 speed auto-shifter hub in the rear wheel. As far as I know ...


4

David - how does it feel to you when you're on your bike and try doing exactly that? Biomechanically, you'll be stressing your muscles to a higher peak level, and then a brief respite. I imagine your overall power output will be lower over a reasonable distance. If you pedal fast then coast for a bit then pedal then coast - I think you'll look like a ...


4

It could be done but would be expensive because you'd need torque sensing cranks. These exist for power monitoring but are priced as a tool for serious athletes. They would give you cadence as well. Then you'd need electronic shifting - also expensive. The actual control could be implemented in any microcontroller of your choice, but you'd need to consider ...


3

I don't believe such a device currently exists that you can mount on a bicycle, but there are devices that have characteristics similar to what you seek that you can mount a bicycle onto. They are specific types of bicycle trainers. The explanation is a bit long but if you understand how trainers work and how they compare to the work you do to move your bike ...


3

Having considered between unsing my android phone as a bike computer and buying dedicated computer, I noticed some points that could serve you. Using cell phone: You need a bike mount to be able to look at the data while you ride, moreso for navigation, and they are somehow bulky, just like a cell phone compared to the dedicated bike gps you mention. ...


3

Shimano's Alfine Di2 electronic shifting system for hybrids has some ability to shift automatically, although I don't know if it is load adjustable.


2

i have one with an automatic,its a six speed . it works really well actually, you just peddle nice and it a real nice up/down shift in the gears its not a hard riding bike anything ,nice causal ride ,great for me and the dog ,but it will up shift and down shift on its own, it seems to be an older bike? i picked it up at a garage sale for ten bucks, it has ...


2

As the Nuvinci system has been mentioned in other answers, I'll mention one more. SRAM makes the Automatix hub now. It's a 2 speed system (ratios 1:1, 1:1.37) with a centrifugal clutch. There's no manual shifting possible and no cables involved.


2

It is far more efficient to cycle at a steady cadence suitable for the terrain and gearing used. In fact this attempt to maintain cadence and maximise efficiency is the reason bikes have gears. Varying the cadence is going to put stress and strain on your muscles, joints and cardio vascular system. This could be your aim (with the exception of stressing ...


2

I'm also a Windows Phone user but I'm still on Windows 8.1 until my phone gets the update. The app I use for recording my rides is Straza Mate, which is another unofficial Strava connected app. As far as I know, it doesn't support heart rate or cadence/speed sensors. I mostly using it for logging miles on commutes as I'm not really concerned about ...


1

You are correct that the weight of the shoes cancel out each other for the rotation part. For an extreme example of the same effect, check out Falkirk Wheel, which lifts 250 tons of water and boat using same amount of water as counterweight. The shoes are not usually centered on pedals, but the axle is under the ball of foot. If hypothetical heavy shoe has ...


1

I think you could do this with a continuously variable transmission and some way to measure the load. You could DIY some pedals to measure with how much force the rider is pushing. The pedals would probably have to wirelessly transmit the data to a microcontroller so that you could adjust the gear ratio, since there isn't really a good way to run wires from ...


1

Best thing is to just get a Garmin that has bluetooth or wifi (1000,820,etc...) It is the best way to get the sensors that the phone apps lack. The new edge 520 is $300 and does all that the phone apps can do + has cadence and heartrate and speed (won't do turn by turn nav, but it does have maps). Plus there are problems with beating your phone on the ...


1

I also have a windows phone but not on the latest version 10 OS - so cannot install or comment on the Garmin Connect app. The closest app to Strava is something called Striver. It saves GPX to the phone and for seamless integration and upload to Strava - you have to pay a small fee for the app. If I am out for a quick ride of 1hr to 1.5hrs my phone is fine ...


1

Looks like an older generation Sigma Sport bike computer with that has its silk screened logos worn away. The two 7-segment displays and small alphanumeric display in the center are their trade mark and as you noticed, the mount is Sigma. The second set of connections in the mount is for cadence sensor that is sold separately. Over the years, Sigma has ...


1

SIGMA make a connecting pod with USB connection to the PC. It takes the bike computer via twist lock. They have their own data suite for reading and archiving data from the bike computer. You should find it on their website.



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