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I also like to cycle in the higher gears, the slower cadence. I have always been told that it is not good for your knees and when I have trouble with sore legs I do switch to lower gears and find that I have less pain. But I do have an upper limit in how fast I can turn my legs, it is going up over the years but I still like the higher gears and the slower ...


3

In addition to the other great answers, slow cadence encourages, for some riders, standing cycling, particularly when going up hills. This places a great deal of stress on the drivetrain, and in particular the bottom bracket. Whether you stand or sit, though, a slower cadence is simply trading speed for force - the effort is the same, but the stress on the ...


8

This subject is about the performance on a bicycle Cycling is aerobic exercise in nature. 1) Fast twitch vs. Slow twitch muscle In high gear (low cadence and higher force per pedal stroke for the same output, in comparison to higher cadence) you recruit more of your fast-twitch muscle, and thus you are doing more anaerobic (not aerobic) exercise. It's OK ...


6

The power you transfer to the bike is proportional to the force on the pedals multiplied by the cadence. There's some upper limit to how much force you can apply, but you can spin more quickly. Sometimes if I'm overtaken by another bike (travelling faster than I am) I've found that I can keep up with that bike, if I change down into a lower gear and then ...


19

Left to their own devices many will cycle at a cadence (a measure of how fast you spin) that approximates cadence of walking, an RPM of about 50-60. So the fact you prefer a slower leg speed is not unusual. Trained cyclists will often have a cadence between 80-110 and up to 200 for sprints (track). Is there something bad about a cycling style in ...


1

The answer is probably the combination of standing up and high cadence. I assume that when you say acceleration you mean hard and short burst of effort. The maximum power in that short period of time will be produced by the fast twitch muscle fibres type, (i.e. when you stand up, low cadence). This type of fibres work anaerobically so you can only sustain ...


1

Get a power meter and see what output you are getting at various rpm / loads. There is a big difference of 120rpm at 200w or 600w. This relationship will most likely not be linear. 150 rpm seems much too high, but everyone is different. I personally find great power at 105-120. Timing yourself or using HR can be a measure as well, but power is the only ...


5

Through personal experience, I have found that the higher cadence method will always get me ahead of the group of commuters at the lights. I sometimes see the standing grinders but by the first downstroke of their crank arm, I am already gaining much more acceleration. The grinders are also wobbling all over the place because their centre of mass is much ...



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