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1

You are correct that the weight of the shoes cancel out each other for the rotation part. For an extreme example of the same effect, check out Falkirk Wheel, which lifts 250 tons of water and boat using same amount of water as counterweight. The shoes are not usually centered on pedals, but the axle is under the ball of foot. If hypothetical heavy shoe has ...


1

I think you could do this with a continuously variable transmission and some way to measure the load. You could DIY some pedals to measure with how much force the rider is pushing. The pedals would probably have to wirelessly transmit the data to a microcontroller so that you could adjust the gear ratio, since there isn't really a good way to run wires from ...


3

I don't believe such a device currently exists that you can mount on a bicycle, but there are devices that have characteristics similar to what you seek that you can mount a bicycle onto. They are specific types of bicycle trainers. The explanation is a bit long but if you understand how trainers work and how they compare to the work you do to move your bike ...


4

It could be done but would be expensive because you'd need torque sensing cranks. These exist for power monitoring but are priced as a tool for serious athletes. They would give you cadence as well. Then you'd need electronic shifting - also expensive. The actual control could be implemented in any microcontroller of your choice, but you'd need to consider ...


3

Shimano's Alfine Di2 electronic shifting system for hybrids has some ability to shift automatically, although I don't know if it is load adjustable.



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