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13

I've had good success with the Go Pro cameras for whitewater kayaking. We generally mount them on our helmets. They stand up to quite a beating and you can get more on a card than the camera you ask about above. If you can mount it on your helmet then it will be pointing where you look and I think you'll have better success getting shots of any collision ...


11

I'm convinced that the prevalence of cameras is changing the attitude of certain drivers. For the last year or so, I've ridden with a helmet cam. I'm now on my second camera and I'm toying with mounting my old camera (lower definition, poorer lens) on the seat post to face to the rear. It wasn't for this kind of situation, but it would certainly be ...


10

I would talk with the local law enforcement first rather then "reporting". This does a couple of things that will actually help rather then hurt (in most cases). You are asking them for advice rather than being a "whining bike rider". Most cops are good guys that want to help out, but if you make it official, they HAVE to do paperwork. If you approach them ...


6

Will mounting a camera on the handlebar instead of the helmet make the picture more shaky? Yes. The helmet mount provides the most stable video because any terrain roughness has already been absorbed by your body. In addition to shakeness the handlebars mount will provide a not so pleasant video because it will constantly be panning left and right due ...


4

Cameras on bikes are a trade-off. I run my camera from the handlebars, but it can be very shaky particularly depending on the road surface: on a newly paved road it can be almost perfect, but on cobbles it's almost useless. Certainly you can helmet mount, but then you can look quite silly. (The cuboid Go Pros on top of a helmet just look ridiculous.) There ...


4

I tried the GoPro for a while and there were several things I didn't like about it, or where I felt it fell short. I'm now looking at buying one of the "tough" cameras produced by almost all of the major camera manufacturers which have several advantages over something like the GoPro or the ATC3K. Things I didn't like about the GoPro are... - The weight on ...


3

A few years ago we bought a pile of the sub-$20 "mini dv" cams off ebay and they work fine as safety cams. Finding a waterproof enclosure is effectively impossible, so I used a plastic bag. At ~$10 each losing one is no the end of the world. Sample video: vimeo.com/15050277. If you're experimenting, buying a couple of those might be a worthwhile start to see ...


3

More shaky: yes. I run a fairly cheap "kaiser baas" camera mounted on my handlebars. It took a bit of work to get a stable video - after some experiments I put a layer of rubber around the handlebars (very large rubber bands) then tightened the mounting as much as possible. The result is acceptable for me. Certainly big potholes and very rough sections ...


3

It's designed so the bit at the top of the picture wraps around the helmet like a headband while the part of the strap that is making a "U" in the picture goes across the top. To keep it from coming off, you'll need it to be fairly tight. This is okay with the helmets that are similar to skateboarding/snowboarding helmets (hard shell), but can make some of ...


3

I bought a DOGCAM Bullet HD Wide camera, on the basis of a decent camera at a good price. The Contour HD is a nice camera but too expensive for me. The DOGCAM Bullet is compact unit, 80mm long and 22mm diameter. Waterproof so strapped to my helmet for kayaking, on the bike I tend to strap it to the bars. It'll last a couple of hours on a battery charge, ...


3

Ortlieb makes two camera-specific bags that you could probably keep inside their handlebar bag, the Aqua Zoom and the Aqua Zoom Plus. However, the Ortlieb Ultimate is a great handlebar bag that snaps on and off the handlebars, and also has a camera insert. I highly recommend the Ultimate, although the mounting is a little tricky to install.


2

I think the Mountain FeedBag would do the trick. It's made for holding food but it's padded with a soft interior and should safely hold your camera. It mounts in the corner between your stem and handlebar, you can easily access it while riding. http://www.epicrideresearch.com/product-information.php Update as of May 2011 The Mountain Feed Bag ...


2

Install any sort of helmet cam, then cover it with a small stuffed toy.


2

Here's a recent example of why it may be pointless to go through the trouble of maintaining a camera for video evidence. Perfectly good video and even an independent witness who observed the driver intentionally swipe the cyclist: NO CHARGES FILED.


2

I had a similar incident (horn blowing, screaming, and attempted assault with his vehicle) and did report it with plate number and description. The interviewing officer told me they'd have to identify me to the driver. Since I didn't trust the him not to seek me out to retaliate, I only left it as a report in case of a future offense. Then the officer ...


2

I use one of these for kayaking - I didn't want a gopro sticking out of the top of my helmet and snagging in trees, and I didn't want to spend a lot. It has a handlebar mount but I haven't tried it. The battery life seems decent but it appears (and this may be an issue with more expensive models as well) to run down faster than I would like when switched ...


2

I'm interested in bicycle cameras at the moment, although for reasons other than reading number plates, and I have found several cameras to be available, which look pretty decent. There's a much wider choice in this market than there was a few years ago. So while I can't say explicitly "such-and-such a camera will read a number plate at 20 paces" I'm happy ...


1

Here's footage of my commute to work in Manhattan. It was filmed using a Polaroid Cube camera. I stuck it onto my handlebars using the Polaroid-made handlebars mount. YouTube allows you to view the video in various resolutions using the "gear" dropdown. Even in 1080p reading license plates can be a dodgy proposition. I say it depends majorly on lighting ...


1

I have a Contour Roam2 which I use at 720p and it gets registration numbers about 6 times out of 10 which isn't bad at all. The usual reason for them not being clear is vibration on my bike (typically due to a poor road surface) but I'm used to reading the registration numbers out aloud now. Edit: I often wipe the lens when I'm stopped at lights etc if it's ...


1

Rideye is coming out with a camera specifically designed as a bicycle black box: http://www.rideye.com/ In your format: 1: 15hr - 3. No weight listed - 4. $149US - 6. 1080p/170° - 7: :) It's not out yet, but at least spec-wise it seems like a winner. It's Kickstarted and a bit delayed, but I'm considering getting one when it's actually for sale.


1

I use a contour roam 2 & found the on/off button brilliant, can use with any gloves. As my commute involves off road/on road, I only record the road elements. So although the battery lasts about 2/2.5hours, I can record almost an entire week (10hours) of rides on 1 battery/memory card. Good tip: At the end of each bit of recording, I record my hand ...


1

Yeah, they're done, but perhaps not out as another company may pick up the brand/product. Check out the article on GeekWire.


1

Must it be helmet mounted? I own a set of 720P Sunglasses shown here: After I fried a my first pair from water getting in by the buttons and USB port, I put black electrical tape over the buttons and seam, and they are now effectively waterproof. The battery life is 2.5-3 hours, and they record to my 16GB MicroSD card, which can then be put right into my ...


1

I'd wait for Liquid Image's Ego to be released this June. $149, 1080p HD, small, waterproof, rechargeable, built-in wifi so you can monitor and control from your iPhone or Android. Buy a black one, and maybe you can embed it into a bicycle helmet without compromising the integrity too much. This camera was announced at the Consumer Electronics Show this ...


1

You are asking for a lot. A camera which has a several hour battery life, by definition needs size to carry the battery. The smallest self contained cameras I am aware of are the Epic Stealth and the Tachyon XC Micro. There is a good review and comparison here. These are both older models compared below. The newer models on the websites linked have better ...


1

There is a product designed specifically for this use, the Cerevellum: a bike computer with a crash recorder, which hooks up to a rear-facing camera. It's not cheap, but it is designed to do exactly what you want.



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