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9

If you want to use it for "proper mountain biking" (however you define that) the answer is almost certainly no. You won't be able to fit wide enough tyres to give you decent grip, and punctures are likely to be a problem. Additionally, the geometry will be all wrong (if you put straight bars on it you'll probably feel quite cramped without a long stem, which ...


8

First thing you should do is read the tech sheet on your fork. I believe the link below is the correct one. http://www.cannondale.com/CMS/Technology/10_HeadShok_Tech_Pages_CUSA.pdf There are also a bunch of manuals here but I didn't see one for the DLR Ti. http://www.cannondale.com/usa/usaeng/Instructions As far as a rebuild goes it will be similar to ...


5

I think it's impossible for it to be coming from the bottom bracket while the pedals are not turning. More likely it's coming from the rear hub. I'd first check whether the spoke guard (if you have one) has come loose and is rubbing against the cluster. And inspect the area behind the cluster for any piece of trash that has gotten in there. Failing that, ...


3

I think there's more wrong than you've spotted. Unless there's a chunk missing from the end of the axle or the dropout you shouldn't get any movement under power or not. Bending a QR skewer is not easy to do, which suggests that there's a lot of force being applied, and it's obviously being applied where it shouldn't be. Here's a picture of that model, and ...


3

No bike, no matter how good, is absolutely silent. It's possible that this bike needs to be tuned better, but more likely, it's simply the fact that it is Shimano's most basic 10 speed components and what is for Cannondale a more basic alloy frame. I would suggest taking it to a different LBS for an opinion on what the real problem is, or if there is one. ...


3

Doing a little research the bad boy line includes both an internal hub model: and a standard hanging derailleur model: If you have the former then your bike includes an eccentric bottom bracket, which will provide chain tension; the biggest of the hurdles when converting to single speed. If so you will most definitely be able to make the conversion ...


3

I'm guessing that they were talking about replacing the rear cassette with a freewheel. However, you can convert pretty much any bike with a rear cassette to a single speed with single speed conversion kit like this one: http://www.universalcycles.com/shopping/product_details.php?id=1764&category=2621 And a chain tensioner like this one: ...


2

I only know this system from older times, perhaps current (2013) systems have different qualities. It uses a wider head tube, because the shock is placed in the steering tube of the fork. Usually, you can install adapters to the frame, so that you can use a normal suspension fork. The main difference is that, instead of using telescopic stanchions, it has ...


2

Have you looked after the chain properly? A two month old bike, ridden in adverse conditions, could easily have developed a creaky chain.


2

The main thing to worry about with a noisy crank is that the crank arm may be loose. If this is so then the crank arm and shaft will be destroyed in short order. Presumably the shop checked to be sure that the crank arms were tight. If so, then on a new bike there are no other creaks that are likely to signal a serious problem. Whether the noises should ...


2

Saddles are personal. There is no way for anyone to give you a good and reliable recommendation that can be guaranteed. Cannondale, like most manufacturers, buys and rebrands saddles from other companies. The stock saddle will be very basic, usually, and replacing is usually a good idea. Third party saddle will have no problem fitting on your bike, and I ...


2

If cannot fit the bike in you have four options: Remove the front wheel and lower seat, this makes the bike much smaller. This is the no cost, no change to car and medium effort to get wheel off and on and get bike in and out of car. Mount a roof rack and use a carrier. This is a medium cost, semi permanent (roof rack can be removed) and medium effort to ...


2

I have experience of them, yes. They are great, when they work. Other than the Lefty, they are probably one of the better short travel cross country mountain bike forks if by best, you mean stiffest & lightest. But you are considering a 'BadBoy' which is usually used on-road. In this case, a fork, headshok or not, is at best a bit of a waste of time, ...


2

From my research on your question, it seems that the 52cm Cannondale six13 Road Bikes should have aluminum head tube, seat tube and rear triangle, with the top tube and down tube being carbon fiber. Here's a very good link that describes the Cannondale six13. http://www.roadbikereview.com/cat/latest-bikes/road-bike/cannondale/six13/prd_321143_5668crx.aspx


2

They look like the same bike to me. Its just different shops listing them in different ways. As far as I can tell, the specifications are exactly the same, but those shops have listed the parts in different ways. eg one has listed both hubs together, the other has them separately. And one specifies what saddle it is, the other doesn't. Both shops are ...


2

None of the other answers deal with the OPs desire to keep the bike inside the car, i.e. not on a rack. To put the bike in the car, you have to take off at least one of the wheels. Pedro sells a "chain keeper" which is designed to keep the chain on or near the derailleur when the rear wheel is off: This should help you considerably (along with old ...


1

If you literally mean inside then: If you are going to remove a wheel and lefty makes front difficult. Then remove the rear and place derailleur up and near rear of trunk. Why place the chain in a container - just leave the chain on the bike. You still have dirt to deal with from front wheel but better than grease from derailleur and chain. Get a rubber ...


1

The BMW roof rack system can be found for ~120$ USD, and 140$ USD for the touring bike carrier. Works extremely well.


1

Turns out there are two six13 models: Pro and Team. The Pro has just the carbon down tube (http://web.archive.org/web/20070222100221/http://www.cannondale.com/bikes/06/CUSA/model-6PC1D.html). The team has both (http://web.archive.org/web/20070222100517/http://www.cannondale.com/bikes/06/CUSA/model-6TC1D.html). Thanks for the helpful comments.


1

"Product Information -- Our Cannondale elastomer kit will make your Head Shox work like new." $42. http://www.suspensionforkparts.net/eshop/index.php?_a=viewProd&productId=156


1

I had a similar era KHS Alite3000 - Most moving parts had been replaced from wear over its life, but pretty much original. AT 10.5kg, RockShox Judy's, XT components etc, it is a light, fast and agile bike. Like you, I gave up serious riding for kids, got back into it last year. The KHS, despite my fondness for the bike, has been given away in favor of a new ...


1

I think the headset on the headshock system is propriatary and can't be used with existing 1 1/2in forks, but uses the same oversized headtube, so you can swap the headset with a standard 1 1/2in or use a reducer for 1 1/2in to 1 1/8in. So, If you can't service the fork, You should be able to swap out the fork if you get a reducer headset (1 1/2in to 1 ...


1

I had the same problem, in my case it was due to the Bottom Bracket, apparently the ones they used are notorious for it as if any water is splashed near them it washes some of the grease out It will not harm the bike though it is very annoying. To fix it you can apply spray grease into the BB. Though bear in mind that it could be coming from the seat, seat ...


1

Heelstrike, which Neil Fein mentioned in a comment, would be my chief concern. You'd need a rack that moves the panniers aft. Axiom makes just such a rack that is designed for bikes without rack-mounting eyelets—instead it mounts to your quick-release skewer (which could make changing flats a PITA). I have seen people touring on road bikes with these, so it ...


1

I had the very same problem a while ago and it turned out that it was the free hub on the rear wheel, and when I checked it the whole cassette was loose. I replaced the free hub and hey presto the problem was solved.


1

silly thing to say probably, but i had a friend who stripped forks with no manual. he positioned his phone and FILMED the strip down so he would know how to rebuild it ! if you have the tools and the confidence go for it. you may find it a breeze !


1

Looks should pretty much take a back seat (no pun intended) to how it feels. Some folks like certain manufacturers or frame types because of the geometry of the frame (yes, I know there's a standard within the industry, but lots of manufacturers tweak that for aesthetics, their preferred geometry, the alignment of the stars, etc.). That being said, go to ...


1

Converting to a straight-up mountain bike would be hard. Converting a road bike to a 650B bike capable of handling dirt trails and gravel is a pretty established practice, mostly entailing swapping the wheelset and brakes: http://www.cyclofiend.com/cc/2010/cc769-joehuddleston0410.html It's more usually done on older frames, but nothing necessarily precludes ...


1

I would strongly advise against converting an aluminum Cannondale road frame to mountain bike duty. They're not built to take the headtube stress a typical suspension fork will inflict on the frame. If you keep a rigid front fork and go the cyclocross route, you'll have better luck.



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