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15

The single-legged fork must truly withstand heavier bending forces than conventional forks, simply due to physics and asymmetricity. But because of it's different construction, the fork is actually stiffer than most 2-legged. Pros The top is attached like a dual crown downhill fork, which is much stiffer than a single-crown. The wheel axle is one-piece ...


9

If you want to use it for "proper mountain biking" (however you define that) the answer is almost certainly no. You won't be able to fit wide enough tyres to give you decent grip, and punctures are likely to be a problem. Additionally, the geometry will be all wrong (if you put straight bars on it you'll probably feel quite cramped without a long stem, which ...


8

First thing you should do is read the tech sheet on your fork. I believe the link below is the correct one. http://www.cannondale.com/CMS/Technology/10_HeadShok_Tech_Pages_CUSA.pdf There are also a bunch of manuals here but I didn't see one for the DLR Ti. http://www.cannondale.com/usa/usaeng/Instructions As far as a rebuild goes it will be similar to ...


5

I think it's impossible for it to be coming from the bottom bracket while the pedals are not turning. More likely it's coming from the rear hub. I'd first check whether the spoke guard (if you have one) has come loose and is rubbing against the cluster. And inspect the area behind the cluster for any piece of trash that has gotten in there. Failing that, ...


4

No bike, no matter how good, is absolutely silent. It's possible that this bike needs to be tuned better, but more likely, it's simply the fact that it is Shimano's most basic 10 speed components and what is for Cannondale a more basic alloy frame. I would suggest taking it to a different LBS for an opinion on what the real problem is, or if there is one. ...


4

None of the other answers deal with the OPs desire to keep the bike inside the car, i.e. not on a rack. To put the bike in the car, you have to take off at least one of the wheels. Pedro sells a "chain keeper" which is designed to keep the chain on or near the derailleur when the rear wheel is off: This should help you considerably (along with old ...


3

I think there's more wrong than you've spotted. Unless there's a chunk missing from the end of the axle or the dropout you shouldn't get any movement under power or not. Bending a QR skewer is not easy to do, which suggests that there's a lot of force being applied, and it's obviously being applied where it shouldn't be. Here's a picture of that model, and ...


3

I only know this system from older times, perhaps current (2013) systems have different qualities. It uses a wider head tube, because the shock is placed in the steering tube of the fork. Usually, you can install adapters to the frame, so that you can use a normal suspension fork. The main difference is that, instead of using telescopic stanchions, it has ...


3

Doing a little research the bad boy line includes both an internal hub model: and a standard hanging derailleur model: If you have the former then your bike includes an eccentric bottom bracket, which will provide chain tension; the biggest of the hurdles when converting to single speed. If so you will most definitely be able to make the conversion ...


3

I'm guessing that they were talking about replacing the rear cassette with a freewheel. However, you can convert pretty much any bike with a rear cassette to a single speed with single speed conversion kit like this one: http://www.universalcycles.com/shopping/product_details.php?id=1764&category=2621 And a chain tensioner like this one: ...


3

I have experience of them, yes. They are great, when they work. Other than the Lefty, they are probably one of the better short travel cross country mountain bike forks if by best, you mean stiffest & lightest. But you are considering a 'BadBoy' which is usually used on-road. In this case, a fork, headshok or not, is at best a bit of a waste of time, ...


3

Wider tires are the first thing to try. The BadBoys are basically rigid mountain bikes with 622mm wheels and narrow tires, so you could also put on mountain bike sized wheels and very wide tires. With a second set of wheels, it's easy to change between road and off-road riding. About suspension forks, with current geometry there isn't much room for the ...


3

I would start with the biggest knobbly tires the frame and wheel will take. It came with a 28 mm. I doubt there is enough clearance to put a mtn 2.2 on it but even a 35 mm or 38 mm is big step. In knobby a 35 mm will be sold as a CX. Run the tires at less than maximum pressure unless you are over like 180 lbs. Those slicks are not the correct tires ...


2

Heelstrike, which Neil Fein mentioned in a comment, would be my chief concern. You'd need a rack that moves the panniers aft. Axiom makes just such a rack that is designed for bikes without rack-mounting eyelets—instead it mounts to your quick-release skewer (which could make changing flats a PITA). I have seen people touring on road bikes with these, so it ...


2

I think the headset on the headshock system is propriatary and can't be used with existing 1 1/2in forks, but uses the same oversized headtube, so you can swap the headset with a standard 1 1/2in or use a reducer for 1 1/2in to 1 1/8in. So, If you can't service the fork, You should be able to swap out the fork if you get a reducer headset (1 1/2in to 1 ...


2

Have you looked after the chain properly? A two month old bike, ridden in adverse conditions, could easily have developed a creaky chain.


2

The main thing to worry about with a noisy crank is that the crank arm may be loose. If this is so then the crank arm and shaft will be destroyed in short order. Presumably the shop checked to be sure that the crank arms were tight. If so, then on a new bike there are no other creaks that are likely to signal a serious problem. Whether the noises should ...


2

Saddles are personal. There is no way for anyone to give you a good and reliable recommendation that can be guaranteed. Cannondale, like most manufacturers, buys and rebrands saddles from other companies. The stock saddle will be very basic, usually, and replacing is usually a good idea. Third party saddle will have no problem fitting on your bike, and I ...


2

Headshok is super-stiff, light and solid. There is virtually zero stiction and the damping is butter-smooth. I have a vintage, 2001 Bad Boy Ultra with Headshok and only recently re-built it (2013) – that's 13 years of reliable operation! The guy who serviced it said I'll easily get another 15-18 years' use, as the updated bearings and seals are even better ...


2

They look like the same bike to me. Its just different shops listing them in different ways. As far as I can tell, the specifications are exactly the same, but those shops have listed the parts in different ways. eg one has listed both hubs together, the other has them separately. And one specifies what saddle it is, the other doesn't. Both shops are ...


2

If cannot fit the bike in you have four options: Remove the front wheel and lower seat, this makes the bike much smaller. This is the no cost, no change to car and medium effort to get wheel off and on and get bike in and out of car. Mount a roof rack and use a carrier. This is a medium cost, semi permanent (roof rack can be removed) and medium effort to ...


2

Campagnolo (not Mavic) make a Shimano-compatible cassette body for the Zonda. It's the same unit as they also use on the Fulcrum wheels and it will take a genuine Shimano cassette directly. Whilst the cassette body is advertised as 10/11s, it will work fine with 8s - the spline pattern on the inside of the cassette sprockets is the same. You will need to ...


2

I think that their main point is not less weight but more control. Imagine the normal 2-legged fork: even though the two sides are connected to the same air spring, you could concievably temporarily compress one more than the other, and now your front wheel is no longer pointed in the direction that the handlebars are. This can only happen if the bridge is ...


2

I've ended up with similar marks on some of my bikes that have tight tolerances for tires. Often I have found that the tire itself doesn't rub, but some of the sprues do. My fat bike in particular has a very tight rear triangle, and even with a properly dished wheel, I have to remove the sprues. As to the danger, you'd have to look very closely and feel ...


2

Bikes don't have enough speed / surface area to hydroplane. A slick does as good as tread in the rain.


1

You'd have to test it out - theres enough variation in tires (esp. studded tires) for two tires to be marked the same size and one fit and one not fit. This thread indicates that for an older Bad Boy with rigid fork was able to clear a 47 mm tire (which looks to be the largest possible), so I'd guess the answer is yes, but YMMV.


1

If you literally mean inside then: If you are going to remove a wheel and lefty makes front difficult. Then remove the rear and place derailleur up and near rear of trunk. Why place the chain in a container - just leave the chain on the bike. You still have dirt to deal with from front wheel but better than grease from derailleur and chain. Get a rubber ...


1

The BMW roof rack system can be found for ~120$ USD, and 140$ USD for the touring bike carrier. Works extremely well.


1

Turns out there are two six13 models: Pro and Team. The Pro has just the carbon down tube (http://web.archive.org/web/20070222100221/http://www.cannondale.com/bikes/06/CUSA/model-6PC1D.html). The team has both (http://web.archive.org/web/20070222100517/http://www.cannondale.com/bikes/06/CUSA/model-6TC1D.html). Thanks for the helpful comments.



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