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8

Here's a rack that will do six. I have no personal experience with this one and the fact that neither of the top two rack companies (Thule and Yakima) do a six bike rack makes me think you should approach with caution. http://www.ihatebikes.net/site/gear/racks-gear/shopping-for-a-hitch-rack-the-northshore-6-bike-rack/ I have seen, with mixed success, ...


7

It depends on how... scratch averse you are for your bikes. A 4 bike trailer hitch rack by Thule can get 4 bikes on it. If you want to ensure that there is never any pedal to frame contact, then you can get 2 bikes on it. In general with some wiggling and possibly removing a wheel or two, you can always get as many bikes as advertised on a given rack. Just ...


6

You can purchase a rack adapter thats primary use is for mixte, womens bikes or bike with angled top tubes. It is a removeable bar that attaches to the seatpost on one end and then attaches between the stem and the headset top bearing at the other end. You then hang the bike on the rack by the adapter.


5

Where I live it is common for commercial operator to purpose build trailers for carrying bikes such as these. The other option I have seen is custom bike racks for back of any flatdeck trailer or trucks. One event here has over 1000 entrants to a relay - they need to transport 1500 bikes on the day, up to 100km..... So it's certainly doable.... I am glad ...


5

I think it depends on the type of bikes you'll be loading onto the rack. I have a 4-bike hitch-mounted rack (similar to this rack). My wife's cruiser is just large enough that it takes some attention to position when I load the next bike to get them all to fit. What I've run into is that the handlebars of smaller bikes tend to get in the way of the ...


4

I've used a trunk rack myself and only put a little denim pocket I made over the pedal of the inner bike and haven't had any troubles with it leaving marks, even after transporting a mountain bike from Mississippi to Massachusetts using it. Before I started using the denim pocket, I did have an occasion where I wasn't careful with the pedal and scratched ...


4

Most of the less expensive car/van rear racks are shaped like this: The arms with pads rest against the vehicle and then straps from the center attach to the hatch, trunk and/or bumper. This should work if you attach the straps to the top, bottom and if included to the side of the hatch. You would be able to open the hatch if the bikes are removed ...


4

It depends on the bike rack and the geometry of your bikes. Typically, from what I've seen, if it says it can hold two, then your fine. I typically recommend the Thule T2. It's a great rack and is super easy to use; I never worry about the bikes when they're on it.


3

I don't think there will be a clear roof vs. trunk recommendation as both systems have their pros and cons: Roof Pro Does not cover the trunk lid (access to the trunk when fully loaded) Bikes stay cleaner (Especially when raining - on the trunk, the rear of the car sucks up road grim which gets into the bikes moving parts) Con You have to lift the ...


3

Considered looking for a Reese hitch instead: E-trailer hitch for Mazda 3. It would offer a cleaner look to the car, be easier to load and unload bikes, and won't damage the car's finish.


3

I don't have any experience with hitch racks holding more than 4 bikes, but I do have an option that you may not have considered. Forget the hitch rack and buy a small utility trailer. Most hardware stores sell trailer frames like this to which you can add a simple plywood box enclosure ore something more elaborate. It looks like the market for a 6 bike ...


3

Keep in mind that hitch racks intended to carry large numbers of bikes (including the North Shore six bike rack) tend to require heavy duty 2" receivers. Ensure your vehicle is properly equipped. If you have room inside the van, you can use one of these to carry a few bikes (perhaps in addition to 4 bikes on a more typical hitch rack): ...


3

Sharing own experience with several racks, either used as bought and even homemade. I can divide them in three categories: Roof Trailer Hitch Trunk/Reardoor. Roof: More adequate for small cars (i.e. not so tall) for reach issues. Also, they work better with lighter bikes (Road bikes, XC bikes or the like). I wouldn't fit a heavy DH bike in a roof rack, ...


3

I've had a bike rack for my car for many years, and having a portable one I could move between cars was very very useful. You never know when you end up with a rental car for a weekend, or go on a trip with a friend (in their car). FWIW, I had this rack, and after 4 years of regular use it didn't leave any marks on my car. The fact that it folds easily ...


2

I have one of these: http://www.halfords.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductMobileDisplay?catalogId=10151&storeId=10001&productId=251011&categoryId=165515&langId=-1 (for some reason that site insists I look at in Mobile view on my phone, it won't let me view the full site, I'll fix the link later when I'm on my computer) With a bit of ...


2

it looks like any hatchback. I have a toyota matrix and here is how I do it: Adjust the inner legs so they sit on the "step" of the bumper. Adjust the outer legs so they rest against the back window - this makes them almost parallel. Place all straps in the appropriate locations Tighten down lower straps Tighten upper straps Tighten side straps Repeat all ...


2

The hitch is not designed to take the kind of forces that 6 bikes can produce. A trailer sits on the ball and cannot twist the hitch, a rack adds twisting forces in all directions. The end result (I have a mate who manages a bike shop) can be pretty expensive - like the guys who's hitch (with 4 bikes on the rack) failed while being followed by a 30 ton ...


2

The Thule T2 is the way to go. The T2 uses trays so that you just set your bike on the tray and lock it down. It is a hitch mount so you will need a hitch on your car. The pros are that it is super easy and hassle free to use. Additionally you can put heavier bikes on here that you wouldn't be able to put on most bike racks. The downside is that it is a bit ...


2

You can get one of those racks that hangs off the boot of your car, I have a hatchback (Vauxhall/Opel Astra) and it works fine There are two straps that are anchored inside the boot and the straps come out of the top door hinge, no marks/wear there The other two straps clip onto the side of the boot door There are two other straps which go down and clip ...


2

As others have indicated, vehicular laws vary from state to state and as such, laws about license plate display will too. However, there is a lot of uniformity between states' vehicular laws. You can most likely count on a couple things regarding the display of your license plates: There is most likely a state statute dictating that your license plate ...


2

This will be state depended, and the law enforcement response is likely very localized (down to individual officer responses). Where I live (outside US) it is illegal to have the numberplate obscured. We have a choice to either temporarily relocate the plate, or we can buy a Supplementary plate. In both cases we have no obligation for number plate lighting ...


2

Information on this forum is old, but one guy says that Enterprise has bike racks. I recommend giving them a call. From their website it says they have ski racks, but doesn't mention bike racks. Might be worth giving them a try.


2

You definitely should not be mounting your bike on the rack by the shock- that's just asking for trouble. The adapter that mikes suggested should do the trick for you, but if you want to use this as a reason to get a new bike rack I would suggest you look into a Thule T2 or Yakima's equivalent. I owned a handful of tray mount style hitch racks that were ...


2

It depends on the exact size. To figure it out, you'd need some detailed measurements. If it fits, there's really no problem. It's more likely a problem with a "ladies" (low top tube) bike if it's smallest size and/or if the frame is sized for a suspension fork. Look at the picture of the bike. See how the distance between the top tube and the down tube is ...


2

Yes, yes it is possible... If the tandem is loaded onto the carrier at an angle, it won't extend much beyond the width of the car or minivan (maybe not at all for a larger vehicle). It's not totally clear in the following picture, but the horizontal bars are tilted up a bit to make it more secure. It's necessary to bungee-cord the bike or otherwise ...


1

I doubt it is going to work on any rear rack. You may be able to install two roof racks end to end or buy an extra long one for tandems. http://www.rackattack.com/product-pages/thule-558p-tandem-carrier.asp?utm_source=google&utm_medium=product-feed&utm_campaign=google-products&utm_term=100558P&gclid=CKf7rrWemboCFdAWMgodllgADg Additionally, ...


1

Pretty much every state in the US and most countries have some sort of law saying your license plate can't be obstructed. That said, can anyone cite any place in the world where they enforce those laws so strictly that a plate slightly and unintentionally obscured has even a remote chance of resulting in some sort of enforcement action? Certainly nowhere ...


1

I have the Thule rack (on my mini cooper), it works great (takes about 10 seconds to mount a bike), and I can still open the hatch with it on. It comes in a 1.25 and 2 inch hitch size (the 2 inch version can expand to hold 4 bikes, the 1.25 will hold max of 2 bikes). http://www.thule.com/en-US/US/Products/Bike-Carriers/Hitch/917XTR-T2 It is not a cheap ...


1

Also consider when purchasing a car, the size of your boot. Bike racks are great and I have used a generic one that clips to the back of your boot door a number of times, but mainly only for longer journeys where the boot and or seat space is needed. Depending on the size/type of car and amount of people/bikes you are transporting most of the time you can ...



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