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12

To answer your questions No, they are not safe to ride due to risk of the tube blowing out or the tire rolling off the rim. No, I do not think they are repairable (at home). If they were repaired I would not trust them again. I believe that this item is not fit for the purpose of a bicycle wheel. It should be returned to the place of purchase on those ...


7

The problem is not the stress from the weight of your U-lock. The (true) stress comes from the compressional hoop stress of the bracket to the carbon fiber tube. The bracket stays in place thanks to the friction, which requires certain amount of compression. Unfortunately, this hoop compression coincidentally directs at the weakest point of this (tubular) ...


6

UD, 3K and 12K specify the carbon weave pattern. 3K means there are 3,000 filaments per "tow", 12K means there are 12,000 and UD means unidirectional (no pattern): The construction of bike parts is always UD, only the top layer when naked can be specified to these different finish types. Also there is usually an option to choose between matte or glossy. ...


4

Carbon is more resilient to this the type of stress then most people give it credit for but still it is NOT recommend for even 2.38 lb lock. When you land a jump that 2.38lbs is a decent force. If someone dropped the lock on your head from a foot a it would hurt. You will even see recommendation from the manufacturer not to even mount a carbon frame ...


4

Its possible, maybe even likely. If you reword the question to "Is an aluminum framed road bike always heavier than a carbon cyclocross or MTB?" the answer is definitely no. Manufacturers play games with frame materials and fool people into thinking because the have a carbon frame they have the lightest. They also play games fooling people into thinking ...


4

I suggest looking at frame bags. They don't carry much, but they have more capacity than the more sensible under-seat bags. You can get various sizes (up to 'fill the triangle'), and could even do both a frame bag and a seat bag. There's a cycle tourist with a carbon bike a bit heavier than yours here so it can be done. Most of the carbon bike people tape ...


4

It is (strongly) not advisable to put a rack on carbon. You could probably put a lock mount on the handlebar stem (I do). You could get an over-sized seat bag. Possibly a handlebar bag. Bottle cage bag but they don't have much capacity. They are good for like wallet, cell phone, and keys. Don't like to do product recommendations but ...


3

1) It's for show, just like the carbon fiber insert on my Leatherman Skeletool CX. See this question. 2) It's fine for touring provided its in good condition. However, you may still want to get a different seatpost depending on the adjustments available on this one.


3

On carbon frames I've used, they have had a single bolt clamp like this one, so it should be fine. Personally, I'd like to use a slightly bigger clamp and one of those rubber size-decreasing rings to avoid cracking the frame. If in doubt I'd phone up the manufacturer of the frame and ask!


3

I'd avoid doing this. Basically, you do a light (typically wet) sanding by hand (very carefully), prime it with an appropriate primer (maybe a few times) and then paint over it with an appropriate color. However, since the sanding has to be done carefully (since its easy to destroy carbon fiber by sanding), you're going to end up paying someone a lot of ...


2

Generally speaking, the deeper the rim the more noise the wheel makes. A pronounced whooshing noise isn't unusual among deep dish wheels and disc wheels (as in the solid wheels, not the brakes) are even noisier. I had Cinelli and Hed discs when I raced and used to love the sound of them (the ride, not so much!) I would personally be very nervous of the no ...


2

I give you the following, that you can read here: Talking to Jason Marsh the mechanic of Greg Minaar 2012 DH World Cup Champion about ENVE DH rims (which are carbon), he said that, ”Once you have built them, you don’t need to do anything, the spokes remain tight and they don’t need truing and we use a lot less through the year as they are ...


2

You could try epoxy as a start (I usually use EpoFix). Remember to: - sand and roughen the contact surface - clean the surface by alcohol to dissolve any grease/oil - mix epoxy and glue the two parts together. - note that if it is your first time mixing epoxy, you might want to practice before making any kind of permanent structure. This epoxy adhesion is ...


2

There are many companies today producing "lugged" frames out of aluminum/steel/titanium with carbon fiber tubes. Seven Cycles is one example, but there are others. Additionally, some people are independently making carbon frames with lugs that have been created using 3D printer madness. Reading various forums and the last link, 3M, Loctite and West System ...


1

My experience is that they help minimise the damage. By being malleable and typically having a foamy backing (for shock). Usually only good for a few impacts. By having ~1mm foam and being somewhat rigid it may help with less aggressive sucks. But if they were stiff and had no tolerance toward the frame, it would mean all the force would transfer through ...


1

I basically did it myself, i needed neither any special tools nor brute force.


1

I would agree with batman that you don't want to paint it. Instead, you can think of skinning it with adhesive film. 3M and others sell series of stretchable adhesive films in various colors and textures that are used in the custom automobile and motorbike market. They should be pliant enough to decorate your bike -- and if applied with care, won't be ...


1

The problem is liability. Any shop is likely to tell replace as they don't want the liability of it breaking and you getting hurt. Plus they want to sell you new frame. I would go with your team mate the mechanic. See if it grows. Even if it does fracture and you fall I bet it will not be your first fall nor fatal.


1

Assuming your current pads are V-brake style, these pads should work well: http://www.swissstop.com/rimbrakes/rxplus/yellowking/ As for the pad holders, it's not easy to find them sold without pads, nor with carbon pads. That's too bad, but you can buy these anyway and use the pads on another bike: http://www.koolstop.com/english/v_type2holder.html


1

The nut is most likely suffering from galvanic corrosion in which case penetrating oil won't work because penetrating oil does nothing to break the chemical bond holding the two parts together. Instead of penetrating oil you can try a mild acid (think lemon juice or vinegar) which might help eat away at the bonds without damaging the finish on your fork. The ...


1

As with motoring, you can use stiffer engine mounts so as to help transfer more power from the engine to the wheels. However, I'm told that it can make for a hideous ride quality in the vehicle. Now Imagine that on an ultra stiff road bike. Great on silky, smooth, new tarmac - but in the real world, wincing on every little bump in the road will affect ...


1

After traumatically sudden failures of a carbon seatpost, and shortly after, a carbon wheel, both resulting into painful crashes, I decided that my next fancy bike would not be a carbon fibre one, but titanium. I ended up buying a Cube HPT (frame made by Lynskey). After two years of moderate use (no crashes) I discovered a horizontal crack across the weld on ...


1

0down vote I also have built a direct drive geared bike. http://comfybikes.blogspot.com.au/p/blog-page_22.html But am interested how Joakim managed to modify the Pinion gears to fit them in the hub? Could NuVinci CVT be modified for the purpose?


1

Check if Specialized will sell the pin stripe kit. But I would not recommend it. Tape over the old would be difficult and not sure it would stick. Remove the old could damage the bike. I would learn to like white. Consider bright green bar tape, seat post, and saddle.


1

Edit: frame is BB94 not 386 Your hollowtech bb wouldn't work as you correctly identified you'd need BB386 pressfit bottom bracket, (see exploded diagram below)you'd just need to make sure the bb you choose is compatible with your chainset and yes ideally you'd need a bottom bracket press to fit this or alternatively your lbs would fit it. You'd need ...


1

You have two options: Using polishing compound WARNING: if this is your first time tinker with carbon fiber composite, I would recommend you to read up carefully, beside from my general guide in here. a) Use sand paper to lightly sand down the scuff. Make sure you do not sand into the carbon fiber. The sanding would produce black powder if you make this ...



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