Hot answers tagged

8

The safest way to carry luggage on a carbon frame is to use a trailer, like the BOB trailers. Carbon frames are very strong, but each area of the frame is designed and tested for the loads it expects from a given direction. Adding luggage to a frame not designed for it, i.e. Without braze-one or threaded mounts, is generally a bad idea.


7

The problem is not the stress from the weight of your U-lock. The (true) stress comes from the compressional hoop stress of the bracket to the carbon fiber tube. The bracket stays in place thanks to the friction, which requires certain amount of compression. Unfortunately, this hoop compression coincidentally directs at the weakest point of this (tubular) ...


6

UD, 3K and 12K specify the carbon weave pattern. 3K means there are 3,000 filaments per "tow", 12K means there are 12,000 and UD means unidirectional (no pattern): The construction of bike parts is always UD, only the top layer when naked can be specified to these different finish types. Also there is usually an option to choose between matte or glossy. ...


5

There are a lot of more potentially useful avenues to investigate first, because you feel that chamois pad quality is not the culprit next most obvious choice is the saddle: Stock saddles are often not very high quality. They are also typically too soft (aka not supportive) which will cause problems on longer longer rides. Adding to this, if you still ...


5

25000 km isn't a lot. There isn't a time or mileage you should consider swapping out a frame. Instead, you should look for damage, such as dented tubes or cracks. You should be especially wary if you've been in an accident to check your bike out. Carbon fiber complicates this a bit, because its failure modes are generally more rapid than metal and harder ...


5

After some thought, your only options are 1) Backpack - hot and sweaty, not particularly large and affects your posture. I've ridden with a tramping (hiking) pack to move my toolkit about, and its not ideal. A smaller day pack would work better, or even a hydration pack if your load is smallish. Some people like sling-style messenger bags. 2) A fanny ...


4

It should be possible to repair the frame, the big question is whether you'll be able to find a replacement tube or will you have to make it yourself. Making the tube isn't hard, it's just messy. The repair will involve cutting out the damaged tube, working out what else (if anything) is damaged, and paying careful attention to the other tubes. Then once ...


4

Its possible, maybe even likely. If you reword the question to "Is an aluminum framed road bike always heavier than a carbon cyclocross or MTB?" the answer is definitely no. Manufacturers play games with frame materials and fool people into thinking because the have a carbon frame they have the lightest. They also play games fooling people into thinking ...


4

I suggest looking at frame bags. They don't carry much, but they have more capacity than the more sensible under-seat bags. You can get various sizes (up to 'fill the triangle'), and could even do both a frame bag and a seat bag. There's a cycle tourist with a carbon bike a bit heavier than yours here so it can be done. Most of the carbon bike people tape ...


3

1) It's for show, just like the carbon fiber insert on my Leatherman Skeletool CX. See this question. 2) It's fine for touring provided its in good condition. However, you may still want to get a different seatpost depending on the adjustments available on this one.


3

I give you the following, that you can read here: Talking to Jason Marsh the mechanic of Greg Minaar 2012 DH World Cup Champion about ENVE DH rims (which are carbon), he said that, ”Once you have built them, you don’t need to do anything, the spokes remain tight and they don’t need truing and we use a lot less through the year as they are ...


2

You have two options: Using polishing compound WARNING: if this is your first time tinker with carbon fiber composite, I would recommend you to read up carefully, beside from my general guide in here. a) Use sand paper to lightly sand down the scuff. Make sure you do not sand into the carbon fiber. The sanding would produce black powder if you make this ...


2

Generally speaking, the deeper the rim the more noise the wheel makes. A pronounced whooshing noise isn't unusual among deep dish wheels and disc wheels (as in the solid wheels, not the brakes) are even noisier. I had Cinelli and Hed discs when I raced and used to love the sound of them (the ride, not so much!) I would personally be very nervous of the no ...


2

You could try epoxy as a start (I usually use EpoFix). Remember to: - sand and roughen the contact surface - clean the surface by alcohol to dissolve any grease/oil - mix epoxy and glue the two parts together. - note that if it is your first time mixing epoxy, you might want to practice before making any kind of permanent structure. This epoxy adhesion is ...


2

There are many companies today producing "lugged" frames out of aluminum/steel/titanium with carbon fiber tubes. Seven Cycles is one example, but there are others. Additionally, some people are independently making carbon frames with lugs that have been created using 3D printer madness. Reading various forums and the last link, 3M, Loctite and West System ...


2

As for crashworthiness: Materials which yield before failure absorb more energy. Cars pass major crash tests because they are made of cold rolled steel. That property reduces the G load on the victims like nothing else. The material property most closely related to energy absorption ability is called elongation. Elongation is what happens before the ...


2

The notion that stiffness equals greater performance is more true in the lab than on the road. Sean Kelly won hundreds of races - often in sprints - throughout the 80s and he won most of those on a Vitus 979 aluminum bike that was probably the most flexible bike used in professional racing in the past 50 years. It's pretty unlikely you'll notice much ...


1

Colnago's EPS and C59 are both lugged carbon fibre bike frames dating from the 90s, when CF was a new material. They had a reputation for unreliability (I don't know if that was the construction, or something else.) Whether you'll find one new, or used and in good condition is a completely different problem. The lugs and the tubes are fastened together ...


1

My experience is that they help minimise the damage. By being malleable and typically having a foamy backing (for shock). Usually only good for a few impacts. By having ~1mm foam and being somewhat rigid it may help with less aggressive sucks. But if they were stiff and had no tolerance toward the frame, it would mean all the force would transfer through ...


1

I basically did it myself, i needed neither any special tools nor brute force.


1

I would agree with batman that you don't want to paint it. Instead, you can think of skinning it with adhesive film. 3M and others sell series of stretchable adhesive films in various colors and textures that are used in the custom automobile and motorbike market. They should be pliant enough to decorate your bike -- and if applied with care, won't be ...


1

Assuming your current pads are V-brake style, these pads should work well: http://www.swissstop.com/rimbrakes/rxplus/yellowking/ As for the pad holders, it's not easy to find them sold without pads, nor with carbon pads. That's too bad, but you can buy these anyway and use the pads on another bike: http://www.koolstop.com/english/v_type2holder.html


1

The nut is most likely suffering from galvanic corrosion in which case penetrating oil won't work because penetrating oil does nothing to break the chemical bond holding the two parts together. Instead of penetrating oil you can try a mild acid (think lemon juice or vinegar) which might help eat away at the bonds without damaging the finish on your fork. The ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible