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7

Ask yourself this- would you buy a car off of Alibaba to save a few bucks, or would you fork over a little more money and buy a Honda/Toyota/whatever? Buy the name brand bike. If your Alibaba bike's headtube snaps off on a gnarly high speed descent, who's going to do something about it? Not Alibaba, and good luck getting the manufacturer from god knows ...


7

Short answer: No. Long Answer: I would not use carbon rims for commuting for several reasons: They make the bike look more shiny than you want, attracting all kinds of unwanted attention. I ride my commuter bike in any weather without too much maintenance. Should the carbon rim fail at some point, I at least won't notice a hairline crack until the wheel ...


7

I have never had or heard of a problem. Over at www.velominati.com, one of the rules is Rule #80 // Always be Casually Deliberate. Waiting for others pre-ride or at the start line pre-race, you must be tranquilo, resting on your top tube thusly. This may be extended to any time one is aboard the bike, but not riding it, such as at stop lights. ...


6

Most carbon rim manufacturers like zipp and enve recommend a brake pad of their own. However, there are typically several pads that will work. Most of these pads are designed specifically to work well on carbon rims. Regular brake pads from alloy rims should not be used on carbon. Zipp recommends the following pads for their rims: Zipp Tangente Platinum ...


5

The real problem with carbon is that it only has two modes -- not broken and broken. When stressed beyond its strength limits the carbon fibers break and the frame is seriously weakened. Plus, once this has happened, the "threshold" for further damage drops lower and lower. And, except for cracks that MAY OR MAY NOT be reasonably visible, there's no ...


5

Carbon is seen as expensive and light while Aluminum is heavier and cheaper. Both are, to all practical purposes, more than robust enough for the job. At the price point you are looking at (for a hard tail), Carbon is a no brainier and superior in every way. If you are worried about failure mode, both are as likely to fail catastrophically as each other, ...


5

I am posting this as an answer but it is more of a long comment. The information I have is from the place I trust to do carbon repairs. According to Hot Tubes aluminum and the carbon resin react. The aluminum must be sealed to get a good bond. The materials are not your hardware grade epoxy. If we were talking about a fishing rod or something that would not ...


4

I've heard of people having their frames x-rayed, but for obvious reasons that's not very practical. The most reliable manner of checking a carbon frame for damage that I'm aware of is the old coin tap test. Get a quarter ( or whatever coin fits that form factor in your local currency) and go over the frame lightly tapping the edge of the coin against the ...


3

Your current bike has decent wheels and reasonable components. If they have been maintained well I don't think you'll see much difference there other than 10spd gearing. The big change to a new bike in that price range will be the frame. It is much easier now to get a frame that actually fits your riding style, I see you have an adjustable angle stem. ...


3

To the best of my knowledge there are no suitable direct-drive hubs available commercially, which means that there are no bikes sold that use them. Schlumpf make a unicycle direct drive hub that offers 1:1 and 1:1.55 gears, but for a recumbent bike those ratios would be ridiculously low. Also, it's obviously fixed gear so without a freewheel it would be even ...


3

I've been looking into this a lot, and asking around at local bike shops, as I'm looking into getting a modern road bike. In terms of failure - both aluminium and carbon are quite brittle, compared to steel, and from what I've heard (all non substantiated) they are both about as failure prone as each other nowadays. Steel can also fail remember! I'd be ...


3

My guess is the alignment was like that before the accident and the reason the gears wont adjust is the derailleur hanger is bent, which is a $10 part and/or a visit to the LBS with a tool to fix it. Even if the frame has been bent, although less than ideal, it is not a safety issue and would not stop me using it - as long as the derailleur hanger can be ...


3

Carbon fiber often stands up to higher stresses than comparable aluminum or steel frames. You really have nothing to be worried about as long as you are buying from a reputable manufacturer. Check out this video for more info: Santa Cruz tests carbon vs aluminum frames You'll notice that aluminum fails under much less stress than carbon does in almost ...


2

These 38/50/60/88 numbers are the 'depth' of the wheel's aerodynamic rim, in millimeters. Let's take 38 for example. This means that from where the tire meets the wheel, the rim extends an additional 38 millimeters towards the hub. When you see 88, that means the rim extends 88 millimeters from the tire. Why does that matter? One of the biggest benefits of ...


2

Bit late to the party but here's my ha'penneth: As noted above a common manufacturing method of CF frames involves "laying-up" multiple layers of resin impregnated fibres of differing orientations to optimise the strength characteristics according to the expected loads and required performance of the frame (e.g. rigid vs supple/flexibe). In this sense CF may ...


2

Carbon is incredibly strong in the direction for which is has been designed to withstand stress and pressure, but can be susceptible to damage that might seem innocuous if received on say an Alloy bike. Your frame for example is incredibly rigid and strong for impact travelling vertically up through your wheels, into your forks and stays, and through the ...


2

Whilst carbon fibre is fantastic for bike frames; it is light and strong and can be formed into interesting shapes - one of the problems is that if the surface is damaged then it can affect the structural rigidity of the component, e.g. frame. Wear and Tear So, it is vitally important to protect the frame as much as you can - especially if you live in a wet ...


2

Always - Always! Follow the instructions regarding torque - otherwise you could snap your frame/post etc.. As for everything else, I think it's the same, I treat my carbon roadie as I would my aluminium. Clean it etc, but with carbon, if you have a crash or such, it would be an idea to check for cracks, and get them looked at!


2

Assuming that you'll never land from a jump with your pedal down on a rock, then there is not problem. On the other hand a little protection doesn't hurt. Maybe you can get those end plugs from CrankSkins. My race face sixc cranks had similar ends on. After riding hard for 1.5 years there aren't any serious dents and dints on them, but again, more ...


2

There's no frame material in the world that will absorb bumps like a bike with a suspension fork/frame. However, the original "suspension" invention that made bicycles practical was the pneumatic tire. If you have a rigid frame and fork, that's all the real suspension you have. Skinny road tires at high psi have about 2-3mm of "travel", a fat commuter ...


2

I think it is a matter of personal preference. I had an aluminium race bike with carbon forks (CELL - Australian) which I used as a commuter, and for the occasional race or climb at home in Colorado. I was curious about the carbon forks and was told that they are not as stiff as normal forks and on long IronMan rides, this makes a massive difference to how ...


2

I have seen videos of an aluminum frame snapping at the weld where the front vertical shaft (where the fork is mounted to) shears off the two horizontal/crossbars. Though these people were doing lots of big jumps on their mountain bikes. I think you will have issues with snapping in either case. A number of factors come into play here. Material quality ...


2

I'm not sure of the type of bicycle you have, the trailer you're using, or how much you plan to tow. However, I have a BOB Yak that I tow behind a 2007 Specialized Allez Expert (with carbon fiber seat stays, but not chain stays), and I have not had any problems carrying groceries, textbooks, and other paraphernalia. If your wife's bike has a similar setup ...


2

TL; DR: There is going to be a lot of difference. A 1500 Euro bike today would probably be comparable to a 6-7000 Euro bike from 10 years ago. Elaboration: There are going to be quite a few improvements in the bike due to technology advances and research and development. Some of the base models will not be radically different from your frame, although even ...


2

If you have carbon rims (with a carbon braking surface) you will need appropriate brake pads, so as not to damage the rims. You do not have to use shimano brake shoes- most (possibly all?) rim brakes will take any brand of shoes. There is a carbon rim insert for Dura Ace, which might fit the ultegra shoes. However if there are no compatible pads for your ...


1

There are so many things that this could be. Given how new the bike is, I might check the headset to see if it's loose. That's just the most likely of many possibilities, though. It's also worth noting that the actual location of various nasty sounds on bikes can be deceiving due to the way the sounds resonate through the bike frame/fork/wheels/etc. Check ...


1

The effects of the chip depend a bit on "how much" was chipped away. Generally it is always better to seal the chip. I have seen water getting under the protective paint/carbon layer and the area slowly expanding. If the chip is small I've heard people using nailpolish with good success. For anything a bit bigger, I would probably bring it into a carbon ...


1

For XC you can find a myriad of wheels that are now carbon. For DH, you can find some examples but they are big money. They're typically more expensive than their aluminium counter parts, but a little lighter. Rotational weight is typically reduced, which will make the bike turn more quickly and feel "snappier". Since you're new at mountain biking, I ...


1

I happen to own two almost identical mountain bikes other than frame. One aluminum (Orbea) with Niner carbon font fork. And the other an all carbon Niner with Niner carbon front fork. I was looking for a Niner carbon frame and found a whole bike at such a deal I bought it. Both are single speed and tubeless. The all carbon has 2.1 tires compared 2.25 on ...


1

You generally don't see bikes sold with drops and suspension (but people do build them). Cross bikes are rigid (though in amateur cross, some people will bring in mountain bikes). Suspension forks are only useful on the road for people who have back problems or are old or something which necessitates the need for a light use front suspension fork to iron out ...



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