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11

To answer your questions No, they are not safe to ride due to risk of the tube blowing out or the tire rolling off the rim. No, I do not think they are repairable (at home). If they were repaired I would not trust them again. I believe that this item is not fit for the purpose of a bicycle wheel. It should be returned to the place of purchase on those ...


5

UD, 3K and 12K specify the carbon weave pattern. 3K means there are 3,000 filaments per "tow", 12K means there are 12,000 and UD means unidirectional (no pattern): The construction of bike parts is always UD, only the top layer when naked can be specified to these different finish types. Also there is usually an option to choose between matte or glossy. ...


4

There are two answers to this question: (Money no object) Go out and buy yourself a carbon frame with all the trimmings. If you want to race, there is no better hardware option. (Money important) you say you haven't even begun to race yet. How do you know you'll like it? How do you know you'll be any good? If you go down a carbon route, you're ...


3

On carbon frames I've used, they have had a single bolt clamp like this one, so it should be fine. Personally, I'd like to use a slightly bigger clamp and one of those rubber size-decreasing rings to avoid cracking the frame. If in doubt I'd phone up the manufacturer of the frame and ask!


3

1) It's for show, just like the carbon fiber insert on my Leatherman Skeletool CX. See this question. 2) It's fine for touring provided its in good condition. However, you may still want to get a different seatpost depending on the adjustments available on this one.


3

I have built a direct drive (geared) recumbent mostly according to Garnet's specifications. The centerpiece is a Pinion gearbox that conviniently has a lot of gears (needed for a recumbent) and an internal freewheel (Pinion still recommend an "extra" freewheel in the backwheel for normal bikes - probably because the chain otherwise would keep turning when ...


3

Please don't hammer it from the front. You risk rotating the nut and completely jamming it in the carbon. Keep at it for a few days with penetrating oil. If that doesn't help: Try to remove the nut by pulling it out from the rear. I would suggest finding out what size bolt will fit through the entire nut (perhaps M4). Get a long bolt or piece of threaded ...


3

At the risk of getting beat up on carbon will give it a try. CF seems to be a sensitive subject. If I had 4 bikes I need to use as step stools I would go with this order (and I really have all but aluminum): 1) steel 2) titanium 3) carbon fiber (CF) 4) aluminum There is a bit of discussion and comments that bearing weight on the top tube is not a ...


2

Generally speaking, the deeper the rim the more noise the wheel makes. A pronounced whooshing noise isn't unusual among deep dish wheels and disc wheels (as in the solid wheels, not the brakes) are even noisier. I had Cinelli and Hed discs when I raced and used to love the sound of them (the ride, not so much!) I would personally be very nervous of the no ...


2

Unless you're standing on it, probably not, especially if its an external/exposed cam style quick release I'm assuming what you're seeing is just the legs coming in a little bit as the spacing is slightly wider than 100mm. As long as it's just a couple of mm, I woudn't worry about it.


2

You could theoretically damage any frame in that manner. Tubes are meant to support a load from either end, not in the middle. No bike is designed to support a great deal of weight on the top tube. Theoretically carbon, steel and titanium could all flex/bend and resume their normal shape, where aluminum couldn't, but nonetheless it still isn't a good idea ...


2

I give you the following, that you can read here: Talking to Jason Marsh the mechanic of Greg Minaar 2012 DH World Cup Champion about ENVE DH rims (which are carbon), he said that, ”Once you have built them, you don’t need to do anything, the spokes remain tight and they don’t need truing and we use a lot less through the year as they are ...


2

I'd avoid doing this. Basically, you do a light (typically wet) sanding by hand (very carefully), prime it with an appropriate primer (maybe a few times) and then paint over it with an appropriate color. However, since the sanding has to be done carefully (since its easy to destroy carbon fiber by sanding), you're going to end up paying someone a lot of ...


1

Edit: frame is BB94 not 386 Your hollowtech bb wouldn't work as you correctly identified you'd need BB386 pressfit bottom bracket, (see exploded diagram below)you'd just need to make sure the bb you choose is compatible with your chainset and yes ideally you'd need a bottom bracket press to fit this or alternatively your lbs would fit it. You'd need ...


1

I would not be afraid to let anybody stand on my carbon fiber, aluminum, or steel bike. If standing on the top tube breaks the bike, it would be liable to break after any minor mishap, and you're safer getting it repaired or replaced. Bikes are sturdy -- even CF road bikes.


1

The nut is most likely suffering from galvanic corrosion in which case penetrating oil won't work because penetrating oil does nothing to break the chemical bond holding the two parts together. Instead of penetrating oil you can try a mild acid (think lemon juice or vinegar) which might help eat away at the bonds without damaging the finish on your fork. The ...


1

A good rule of thumb is: if you spend less than $2000 get aluminium instead of carbon as you'll get more bang for your buck. A good quality aluminium frame with some nicer wheels will generally give a better/faster ride than an entry-level carbon bike (bought just for the sake of having carbon!). The slight performance/comfort benefits of a more expensive ...


1

You need to check with the manufacturer of your bars (and the grips you're choosing), but in most cases its not a problem. As with all things carbon fiber, don't over tighten anything. Some manufacturers have specific grips which are marketed as carbon fiber friendly. For example, Easton's lock on grips are marketed as being friendly with carbon bars. ...


1

0down vote I also have built a direct drive geared bike. http://comfybikes.blogspot.com.au/p/blog-page_22.html But am interested how Joakim managed to modify the Pinion gears to fit them in the hub? Could NuVinci CVT be modified for the purpose?


1

As with motoring, you can use stiffer engine mounts so as to help transfer more power from the engine to the wheels. However, I'm told that it can make for a hideous ride quality in the vehicle. Now Imagine that on an ultra stiff road bike. Great on silky, smooth, new tarmac - but in the real world, wincing on every little bump in the road will affect ...


1

After traumatically sudden failures of a carbon seatpost, and shortly after, a carbon wheel, both resulting into painful crashes, I decided that my next fancy bike would not be a carbon fibre one, but titanium. I ended up buying a Cube HPT (frame made by Lynskey). After two years of moderate use (no crashes) I discovered a horizontal crack across the weld on ...



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