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7

I have never had or heard of a problem. Over at www.velominati.com, one of the rules is Rule #80 // Always be Casually Deliberate. Waiting for others pre-ride or at the start line pre-race, you must be tranquilo, resting on your top tube thusly. This may be extended to any time one is aboard the bike, but not riding it, such as at stop lights. ...


7

Short answer: No. Long Answer: I would not use carbon rims for commuting for several reasons: They make the bike look more shiny than you want, attracting all kinds of unwanted attention. I ride my commuter bike in any weather without too much maintenance. Should the carbon rim fail at some point, I at least won't notice a hairline crack until the wheel ...


6

Most carbon rim manufacturers like zipp and enve recommend a brake pad of their own. However, there are typically several pads that will work. Most of these pads are designed specifically to work well on carbon rims. Regular brake pads from alloy rims should not be used on carbon. Zipp recommends the following pads for their rims: Zipp Tangente Platinum ...


5

The real problem with carbon is that it only has two modes -- not broken and broken. When stressed beyond its strength limits the carbon fibers break and the frame is seriously weakened. Plus, once this has happened, the "threshold" for further damage drops lower and lower. And, except for cracks that MAY OR MAY NOT be reasonably visible, there's no ...


5

Carbon is seen as expensive and light while Aluminum is heavier and cheaper. Both are, to all practical purposes, more than robust enough for the job. At the price point you are looking at (for a hard tail), Carbon is a no brainier and superior in every way. If you are worried about failure mode, both are as likely to fail catastrophically as each other, ...


4

There are two answers to this question: (Money no object) Go out and buy yourself a carbon frame with all the trimmings. If you want to race, there is no better hardware option. (Money important) you say you haven't even begun to race yet. How do you know you'll like it? How do you know you'll be any good? If you go down a carbon route, you're ...


3

Your current bike has decent wheels and reasonable components. If they have been maintained well I don't think you'll see much difference there other than 10spd gearing. The big change to a new bike in that price range will be the frame. It is much easier now to get a frame that actually fits your riding style, I see you have an adjustable angle stem. ...


3

To the best of my knowledge there are no suitable direct-drive hubs available commercially, which means that there are no bikes sold that use them. Schlumpf make a unicycle direct drive hub that offers 1:1 and 1:1.55 gears, but for a recumbent bike those ratios would be ridiculously low. Also, it's obviously fixed gear so without a freewheel it would be even ...


3

I've been looking into this a lot, and asking around at local bike shops, as I'm looking into getting a modern road bike. In terms of failure - both aluminium and carbon are quite brittle, compared to steel, and from what I've heard (all non substantiated) they are both about as failure prone as each other nowadays. Steel can also fail remember! I'd be ...


2

I have seen videos of an aluminum frame snapping at the weld where the front vertical shaft (where the fork is mounted to) shears off the two horizontal/crossbars. Though these people were doing lots of big jumps on their mountain bikes. I think you will have issues with snapping in either case. A number of factors come into play here. Material quality ...


2

These 38/50/60/88 numbers are the 'depth' of the wheel's aerodynamic rim, in millimeters. Let's take 38 for example. This means that from where the tire meets the wheel, the rim extends an additional 38 millimeters towards the hub. When you see 88, that means the rim extends 88 millimeters from the tire. Why does that matter? One of the biggest benefits of ...


2

I have built a direct drive (geared) recumbent mostly according to Garnet's specifications. The centerpiece is a Pinion gearbox that conviniently has a lot of gears (needed for a recumbent) and an internal freewheel (Pinion still recommend an "extra" freewheel in the backwheel for normal bikes - probably because the chain otherwise would keep turning when ...


2

I'm not sure of the type of bicycle you have, the trailer you're using, or how much you plan to tow. However, I have a BOB Yak that I tow behind a 2007 Specialized Allez Expert (with carbon fiber seat stays, but not chain stays), and I have not had any problems carrying groceries, textbooks, and other paraphernalia. If your wife's bike has a similar setup ...


2

TL; DR: There is going to be a lot of difference. A 1500 Euro bike today would probably be comparable to a 6-7000 Euro bike from 10 years ago. Elaboration: There are going to be quite a few improvements in the bike due to technology advances and research and development. Some of the base models will not be radically different from your frame, although even ...


2

@DWGKNZ was right, turned out that there was a 3mm hex at the bottom. Picture of the removed plug, upside down: Thanks for quick and useful advice.


2

Riding without enough seat post in the bike is a real problem. Not only do you increase the mechanical advantage of the seat post against the seat tube but you put stress where the bike was probably not designed to take stress. And you are putting stress in the area of the top tube and seat stay. You state you have been riding with a longer post. Have ...


2

If you have carbon rims (with a carbon braking surface) you will need appropriate brake pads, so as not to damage the rims. You do not have to use shimano brake shoes- most (possibly all?) rim brakes will take any brand of shoes. There is a carbon rim insert for Dura Ace, which might fit the ultegra shoes. However if there are no compatible pads for your ...


2

Unless you're standing on it, probably not, especially if its an external/exposed cam style quick release I'm assuming what you're seeing is just the legs coming in a little bit as the spacing is slightly wider than 100mm. As long as it's just a couple of mm, I woudn't worry about it.


2

Please don't hammer it from the front. You risk rotating the nut and completely jamming it in the carbon. Keep at it for a few days with penetrating oil. If that doesn't help: Try to remove the nut by pulling it out from the rear. I would suggest finding out what size bolt will fit through the entire nut (perhaps M4). Get a long bolt or piece of threaded ...


1

A good rule of thumb is: if you spend less than $2000 get aluminium instead of carbon as you'll get more bang for your buck. A good quality aluminium frame with some nicer wheels will generally give a better/faster ride than an entry-level carbon bike (bought just for the sake of having carbon!). The slight performance/comfort benefits of a more expensive ...


1

You need to check with the manufacturer of your bars (and the grips you're choosing), but in most cases its not a problem. As with all things carbon fiber, don't over tighten anything. Some manufacturers have specific grips which are marketed as carbon fiber friendly. For example, Easton's lock on grips are marketed as being friendly with carbon bars. ...


1

There's no reason to worry about carbon fibre durability. I'm riding on a 20 year old Specialized Epic Allez (CF tubes with Al lugs), and it's just as light and stiff as it was when new. If you have a serious accident CF may break in a non-repairable way, but the same is more-or-less true about aluminium as well, although it may take more of a tumble to ...


1

Your assumptions are right on, the carbon fiber stays are definitely our biggest obstacle. They prevent you from being able to powder coat the aluminum, the risk of damaging the carbon fiber from heat in the process is too great. A professional in town should be able to properly mask the carbon fiber and sandblast or glass bead blast the aluminum. I believe ...


1

According to the Shimano groupset page, both brake options for the Ultegra Di2 6870 groupset (BR-6800, BR-6810) ship with the Shimano R55C4 pads, which are designed for carbon rims. So more than likely, either the brakes are not setup correctly, or the Shimano pads suck.


1

There are so many things that this could be. Given how new the bike is, I might check the headset to see if it's loose. That's just the most likely of many possibilities, though. It's also worth noting that the actual location of various nasty sounds on bikes can be deceiving due to the way the sounds resonate through the bike frame/fork/wheels/etc. Check ...


1

The effects of the chip depend a bit on "how much" was chipped away. Generally it is always better to seal the chip. I have seen water getting under the protective paint/carbon layer and the area slowly expanding. If the chip is small I've heard people using nailpolish with good success. For anything a bit bigger, I would probably bring it into a carbon ...


1

For XC you can find a myriad of wheels that are now carbon. For DH, you can find some examples but they are big money. They're typically more expensive than their aluminium counter parts, but a little lighter. Rotational weight is typically reduced, which will make the bike turn more quickly and feel "snappier". Since you're new at mountain biking, I ...


1

I happen to own two almost identical mountain bikes other than frame. One aluminum (Orbea) with Niner carbon font fork. And the other an all carbon Niner with Niner carbon front fork. I was looking for a Niner carbon frame and found a whole bike at such a deal I bought it. Both are single speed and tubeless. The all carbon has 2.1 tires compared 2.25 on ...


1

If you're really that concerned, get a roll of 3M "copter tape" and cut it to the same size as the cleat. Given the cleat should never move, the most you should get is a bit of marking where the cleat sits which you'll never see as the cleat should never move (and it's helpful when you're replacing cleats)



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