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19

If you want to maximize your max. speed, go for an 11 tooth cog. If you want to maximize your average speed, unless you're a pro you probably are better off without it. Even cruising at 40km/h does not require and 11 tooth cog. For example, take a look at this table, showing cruising speeds for a 11- 21 tooth cassette: And compare to this table for a 12 - ...


10

That's an impressive amount of mileage on a single chain. Especially on a narrow 11-speed one. I'm guessing that you keep everything very well maintained and don't ride in much wet weather? The two main problems you'll get from a worn cassette are: Skipping chain (either between cogs or jumping on a single cog) Premature chain wear (as the chain ...


10

For me, and for many riders that come through my shop, the 11-25 is missing the critical 16t cog, which (at least for me) is the sweet spot. That is, the gear which I don't tend to spin out of, and that doesn't turn in to a grind fest. If I'm doing a Euro trip, then I will run an 11-28, with a compact front. But at home, for daily riding, a standard 53/39 ...


10

Most of the noise comes from pawls on the freewheel hitting against the splines on the engagment surfaces which makes up the racheting unit. Some reasons for the noise between freewheels? Tension on pawls could be higher causing more noise as they glide over the engagment surfaces High end freewheels have more pawls and engagement points than lower end ...


9

Ultimately it's a trade-off between a wider range of gears and bigger jumps between those gears. There will always be uphills that are too steep for your lowest gear and downhills where you spin out. If you try to fix both problems with a wider range cassette (your triple already has a great range) you may find that you're never quite in the "right" gear ...


9

You'll probably need to replace the cassette as well. Generally once the chain has worn ("stretched") a little, it starts to wear down all the gears (front and back) that it touches. If there's enough wear that the front chainrings need to be replaced, it's almost certain that the gears on the cassette that you use most are also worn enough to need ...


9

The spacing between 9 speed and 10 speed is controlled at the shift lever. A 10 speed rear dérailleur will work with a 9 or 10 speed cassette and shifter. A 9 speed rear dérailleur is not compatible with 10 speed. The width of the chain and the cogs is the biggest issue. The pulleys on a 10 speed dérailleur are narrower, and a 10 speed chain will not rest ...


9

If you take the back wheel off you should be able to examine the freewheel/cassette to determine which it is. Here is a picture of some common types. If yours doesn't look like one in the picture, post a close up and I'm sure someone here can identify it.


8

A spacer to convert an 8/9 speed freehub to 7 speed freehub goes behind the cassette, between the hub shell and the cassette. Most cassette lock rings will not bind on the spacer, they will go inside it if you place it on the outside. In addition, the aluminum used in most cassette spacers is too soft, and would compress under direct compression from the ...


8

Drivetrain components tend to wear in this order: Chain Rear cassette/sprockets Front chainrings (and the teeth on your derailleur's jockey wheels may last, but the bearings may not) The chain is usually the culprit for wearing out the other two. As it wears, the distance between links effectively increases, and the mismatch between the links and teeth ...


8

No, you will need to get a whole new cassette, the largest 3 rings are connected to each other, you cannot just purchase individual cogs. You may want to get a new chain as you will probably need to make a chain length change with jumping from a 25T to 27T or 28T largest cog. Do you know if you have the SS or the GS? With the SS (short cage) you can go as ...


8

Assuming you have Shimano-compatiple Hyperglide cogs: No, you can't. The cassette body is not symmetric, the cassette fits in only one position. You could resort to adapt the cogs with a file, though. But shifting will be problematic at least, the cogs have certain indents to make shifting smoother.


8

The problem is that any rear cluster designed for indexed shifting has directional cogs. There are ramps embossed on the sides of the cogs to catch the chain pins and lever the chain up to the next larger cog when the chain is shifted. If you somehow reverse the cogs these ramps will be on the wrong side of the cogs and will be running the wrong direction. ...


8

From Sheldon Brown: Spoke Protector A plastic or sheet-metal disc that fits between the cluster and the right-side spokes of a rear wheel. This is intended to prevent the derailer or chain from getting caught in the spokes, possibly causing very extensive/expensive damage/destruction to the wheel, the derailer, and the frame. A spoke ...


8

From personal experience, having just changed to a cassette with less range, I have to say that smaller steps definitely offers some advantage. I went from an 8-speed 11-32 to a 12-23. Having a single tooth of difference between adjacent gears means that it's more likely that you will be in the "right gear". The "right gear" is the gear in which you aren't ...


8

The point is efficiency. Cyclists actually have quite a narrow optimal power band. Most of us can bang away at a cadence of 50 rpm, up to about 90 rpm. Some of us pedal faster - 90 to 120 rpm. At those lower cadences (50) it feels like we're producing lots of power and at the high cadences it feels like we're just breezing along. But that is confusing ...


7

I think these may be what you're looking for. FYI, a lot of this information is available with a little searching. Depending on what exactly you are looking for, you might want to look up a document for a specific cassette as the numbers might be slightly different. Spacer widths (From Shimano tech docs) 8 Spd: 3.00mm 9 Spd: 2.56mm 10 Spd: 2.35mm (1.0mm ...


6

Without experience, or obvious damage, a cassette gauge like the one from Rohloff, or mileage are your best options for deciding when to replace a cassette. For me, a good rule of thumb has been: 10 chains = 2 cassettes = 1 set chain rings That is, I change my chain every 1200-1500km. I change the cassette on the 5th time I change the chain. And I change ...


6

You should always install a new chain (or have one that's pretty new already) when you install a new cassette. But you can go through 5 or so chains on a single cassette.


6

You may need to change your cassette with your chain due to damage, but only if your bike has missed out on some previous maintenance. If you ride one chain beyond the point of wear, it will damage both cassette and chain rings to different degrees. Your chain is a consumable component on your bike. For most people, 1200-1500 kilometers on a chain is a ...


6

7 speed systems use slightly wider chains, and the teeth on the chainring are slightly wider too. You might run into an issue with a ten speed chain not fitting over the teeth, or at least not fitting well.


6

If you're saying that, off the body, the sprockets move slightly relative to each other, that's not a problem. The sprockets are only just "tacked" together so that they remain in the right order and orientation while off the body. The body provides the strength to hold them. If, on the other hand, you notice that the sprockets slide up and down the body ...


6

Over time an old chain and cassette wear together, so you don't notice the wear until it gets really bad. When you replace the chain while leaving the old cassette the tooth profile is no longer correct and the new chain will skip off of the teeth, especially under load. Unfortunately it won't get better and the only recourse is to replace the cassette as ...


6

The key property is hardness. For uniform materials (like cogs), hardness directly affects wear resistance. The harder the metal the longer it will last. Some digging around wikipedia suggests that typical Brinell hardness values are: pure aluminium 15HB, 6061-T6 aluminium (heat treated) 95 HB mild steel 120HB, 4130 CroMo steel 183-217 HB (90-96 ...


6

If you are looking to go faster on the flats you can find multiple cassette models with a range of 11-34. If you are looking for more "granny" on the hills, 12-36 is the best you are going to find out of the box without swapping out the low ring. (Sheldon Brown) That said, on most 9-speed cassettes I have seen, the smallest ring or two are not riveted to ...


6

You probably can't fit a bigger front chainring on that bike due to the front derailleur and chain issues. They do make 11 toothed 7 speed cassettes which you can install (but I doubt you'll gain anything from it due to the second point I want to make on cadence), which will give you a bit higher gearing but the spacing between the cogs (i.e. the number of ...


5

I've heard different rules of thumb (rule of thumbs?) about how much use you can get, and remember none of them. What I do know is that not lubeing a chain often enough--actually, cleaning and lubeing--will cause it to wear such that it 'stretches'. Not stretch like taffy, but gain overall length due to the pins and bushings in the links wearing down, ...


5

A 12-27 cassette would give you a slightly wider spread of gears. Depending on your drivetrain you might be able to fit a 11-32 MTB cassette, though you'll probably need an MTB rear derailleur too. The jumps between ratios on wider cassettes can be annoying, though.


5

The 14/28 is the number of teeth on the smallest and largest cog of the cassette. From your description you want to make at least the second number smaller, possibly the first number. As long as your replacement says that it's Shimano compatible (and 7 speed), you should be fine. Count the teeth on the cog that has the most teeth that you actually ...



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