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3

If you are skipping gears, I suggest the cable tension need to be reset. Shift to the smallest cog, undo the bolt fastening the derailleur cable and then refasten, ensuring there is just enough tension to hold the cable tight. You should then be able to accurately shift up one gear at a time and go through all 9 clicks. It may take a few attempt to get ...


2

Converting your single speed bike to geared one is probably not worth the effort, for several reasons: Cassettes and hub gears both need different kind of wheel hubs than single speeds. You will need to change the whole wheel. Single speed bicycles usually have narrower rear fork spacing (distance between rear fork dropouts) than geared ones. Your rear ...


0

Your cheapest option is to mount the 8 speed cassette on the new wheels. This will require a spacer but it'll get you up and running with minimal fuss and risk. If you want to upgrade your bike to support the 10 speed cassette then you will need: 10 speed shifters ...you could replace only the rear shifter, but they're usually sold as a pair and you ...


1

So, I'm thinking that this is a bike that was originally setup with an 8-speed drive train. At some point the previous owner replaced the rear wheel with one built around a 10-speed hub. If I'm reading Sheldon Brown's page on hub and cluster compatibility correctly you should be able to mount an 8-speed cassette on a 10-speed free hub body. So it seems like ...


1

Very generally speaking, the number of cogs on the cassette needs to match the number of clicks in the shifter. If your shifter clicks through 9 gears then you need a 9 speed cassette. If it has 8 clicks as yours does then you need an 8 speed cassette. If you want to switch to 10 speeds then at a bare minimum you'd need new 10 speed shifters and quite likely ...


-2

You will probably need to get a ten speed derraileur. Otherwise you might be able to get by with friction shifters if you've already got a thinner chain. This isn't the brightest idea because it's basically the same thing as driving a manual and requires some cursory knowledge of how the shifting mechanism works.


2

YOU SHOULD HAVE CHECKED BEFORE BUYING THE WHEELS! 10-speed Dura-Ace is not compatible with other cassettes. You can install a 8 speed cassette on other Shimano 10-speed compatible hubs. Edit: Reading the question again, of course you can keep the 10 speed cassette. Just replace the shifters, rear derailleur and chain with 10-speed ones and be prepared to ...


1

If you have a bike you can ride now, I'd suggest putting its gear configuration into an online gear calculator (I'm kind of fond of this) so that you can see the ratios and spacings of a bike you've ridden and compare them with the options you're considering for your new bike. For me, I'm most interested in a gear that feels good for cruising on the flat ...


0

Some math: the bold numbers are turns of the rear wheel per turn of the crank. 39/52 crankset: with 11-25 cassette: from 39/25 = 1.56 to 2/11 = 4.73 with 12-28 cassette: from 39/28 = 1.39 to 52/12 = 4.33 with 12-30 cassette: from 39/30 = 1.3 to 52/12 = 4.33 34/50 crankset: with 11-25 cassette: from 34/25 = 1.36 to 50/11 = 4.55 with 12-28 ...


4

Campagnolo wheels are available with both Shimano/SRAM and Campagnolo cassette compatible freewheel bodies. Ask which cassette your friend has and if they have Campagnolo, you can get the correct freehub body as a spare part. SRAM/Shimano and Campagnolo cassettes have slightly different cog spacing. You can mix them, but the derailleur adjustment will be ...


0

There is another reason which has not been mentioned - the rear hub uses a ratchet mechanism which grabs the wheel in one direction and lets it spin free (coast) in the other. There will be two or more of these spring loaded "wings," called pawls, that grab teeth inside the freehub body or freewheel, this is where the clicking sound comes from. In some ...


2

There are currently 4 MTB freehub/cassette standards for SRAM/Shimano drive trains: 7 speed - Shimano/SRAM - based on Shimano HG 8/9/10 speed - Shimano/SRAM (a 7 speed cassette with a 4.5mm spacer also fits) based on Shimano HG Shimano 11 speed - fits an 8/9/10 freehub (MTB only) - based on Shimano HG SRAM 11 speed - XD driver freehub - SRAM proprietary ...


1

Really hard to say without knowing what hub you're running. Most likely the pawls failed inside the cassette body. The pawls and springs are the mechanism which allow cassette to spin freely independent of the wheel (like when you coast or spin the cranks backward). When forward pressure is applied to the cassette the pawls and springs engage and thus move ...


-1

I had same problem and it was caused because the hub was tightened wrongly. It matters what side is tightened first. So it also could be that the hub just untwisted.



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