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I can say from experience this does not work well at all. Although as mentioned above the chain does run through the shifting is dreadful. I tried it with a 10 speed shifter but gears would always have a spot where they would jump. Just get a 10 speed rear derailleur. You will be glad you did.


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Will it work? Probably. The range of movement of the mech wont be an issue and the chain will run through it, so I cant see why it wouldnt work. This article is quite helpful: http://velonews.competitor.com/2015/03/bikes-and-tech/technical-faq/technical-faq-10-11-speed-drivetrain-component-compatibility_362722 Shimano will tell you 11spd components wont ...


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Here's another gear-inch calculator that may be easier to use: http://cycleseven.org/bicycle-gear-inch-calculator Basically, the 52/36 will allow 5% higher top-speed before spinning-out compared to the 50/34. (Many say that your aero-tuck and other factors are more important at those speeds anyway.) But on the hills, you'll find the 36 to be harder to ...


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You might want to make sure your chain still bends at the links where you pressed the pin back in. Smashing it together too hard is easy and that will "freeze the chain straight at that point. This of course will cause a skip. I'm not an expert, but the freewheel looks pretty solid to me. Still has the chamfers ground out on the trailing edge without any ...


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Indeed as per the comments the 'lock' mechanism on Shimano rear derailleurs (to reduce chain slap) is called "Shadow Plus". Whilst this was initially a feature of the higher end models (XT / XTR) a few years ago, it has since filtered down to some lower models, such as SLX and Zee (although I think not yet on Deore ... anyone correct me?!)


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It depends on your rear derailleur. For 11-34 you will need a long cage one.


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The load is spread across more teeth on the chainrings than on the cassette, so they tend to last quite a bit longer. If they said your chainrings are fine, then they are probably no problem. derailleurs don't really have many parts that can wear out. There isn't much load being placed on the jockey wheels, so they can last quite a long time. The spring ...


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You probably need to adjust the 'top stop' screw on the rear mech, and also tighten the rear gear cable. The rear mech has two small screws. One of these adjusts how far up/inward the mech will move and the other screw adjusts how far down/outward it will move. They are used to prevent the chain dropping off the top and bottom of the cassette. Work out ...


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The difference is simply in the number of teeth on the chainring, and therefore the distance that the chain will travel when you turn the crank. With the standard crank you will be pushing the chain further, and therefore given the same cassette, the standard chainring will provide longer gearing than a compact, and require more power to turn. There are ...


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50/34 with and 11/32 on the rear is going to be very spinny. For me - the range is too wide and the gaps between the gears too big. But - this depends on the kind of riding you will be doing. If you are riding the very steepest of mountains - than the 34/32 combination might be what you are looking for. Purely for fast road work - that's too wide a ...


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The derailleurs are usually matched to the size of the cassette/chainrings. the cage length of the rear derailleur is matched to the largest cog. that is why you see mountain bikes with a 34 tooth in back with long cage derailleurs and road racing bikes with the little derailleurs matched to the corn cob size cassettes. The curvature of the front ...


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1 Here is an excellent technical reason not to: maybe you simply can't put the 11-* cassette onto your hub. For instance, if we consider Shimano HyperGlide: the Shimano cassettes which have 11 cogs require the HyperGlide-C (compact) style hub, whose splines do not extend all the way to the edge. The 11 cog does not actually go onto the splines like the ...


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Logically, the longer chain cannot cause a problem. This is because your 11-28 cassette already includes an 11-23 cassette inside it. The longer chain is working just fine with the 11-23 which are there now. It will work exactly the same if 11-23 is the entire range! If you have no droop with 11-28, there will not be droop with 11-23 with the same chain ...


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You'll need to: Maybe respace the rear dropouts, depending on the age of the frame. Modern wheels are wider than older wheels. For reference, 7 speed road is 126 mm, 7 speed mountain is 130 mm, 10 speed road is 130 mm and 10 speed mountain is 135 mm. Note that your frame needs to be steel for respacing to work -- if it isn't steel, you risk frame failure. ...



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