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3

Should work. Put a new chain on. New chain as a worn chain will wear the cassette as it is stretched and does not match up. If the chain is severely worn it may even jump. Chain is cheaper and should be replaced unless it is almost new. A cassette will typically last 2-3 chains. If you sometimes use 28 then why are you giving that up? Is a closer ...


1

My guess is that the rear hub is defective, or (at least for the first incident) was improperly assembled. If the cone lock nuts on the axle are not set tight enough, it's possible (especially with a slightly bad or poorly lubricated bearing) for the (probably right) cone nut to be pulled tighter and tighter until either the bearing seizes or the axle ...


0

What kind of dropout did you have welded back in your frame when you had it repaired? A higher quality dropout might be in order.


1

You already more or less answered your own question. The reason is that in a freewheel hub the drive side bearing is close to the center of the axle. This gives the forces from your weight and pedaling much more leverage to bend the axle than on a Shimano-style freehub where the drive side bearing is located at the end of the axle. When the axle bends, it ...


-2

If you change your chain you must change the cassette or you're looking for problems. The chain basically molds the cassette and when you put a new one on, it's fresh but the cogs are shaped by your old worn out chain. So the new chain will not work well with the old, worn cassette.


0

Something I haven't seen anyone say here is that your bike isn't made for high speeds. Higher speeds could be unstable on your hybrid, so it might be a good idea to try out some road bikes (or cyclo-cross if you ride on a variety of surfaces).


2

Wow, looks like a lot of people harping on one point & not offering much other helpful advice. While probably right that you are not going at as high a cadence as you think, they are ignoring that the geometry of your body on the bike absolutely has an effect on your ability to maintain a a higher speed & cadence. More below, but to go faster I ...


1

Since the guard is "beat up" it seems to have been doing it's job. So the derailleur is, or was, out of adjustment. Making sure the derailleur is properly adjusted is the first thing to do. The next thing is to ride the bike for some weeks to see if it stays adjusted. If the derailleur stays adjusted then you could remove the spoke guard rather than ...


2

This is called the spoke guard and prevents the chain from getting tangled in the spokes if the rear derailleur is improperly adjusted. Properly adjust your rear derailleur and you will have no need for the spoke guard and can throw it away.


0

Easy but you need a special tool for extracting the gears, and there is not a standard one, brands have different, it is a job for a bike shop, I'm afraid, but should be inexpensive


0

Go to you local bike shop. See if they have something (used will do just fine) with a cycling computer on it that has cadence measurement (any cycling computer). Ask to take it for a test ride, and get to where you feel your legs are spinning at about the same rate they normally are on your bike. Then look at the cadence read-out. About 90 RPM is what you're ...


2

What others are saying is right. If you have a 48/11 and are only going 20 mph (32 km/h) then you aren't spinning fast enough. You also won't be able to find a cassette with smaller than an 11 tooth cog. You'll have to get bigger chain rings. That being said, it might be difficult to spin fast on a hybrid with platform pedals. Personally I find it easier ...


0

Based on very little knowledge and your comments I suspect you are not even in high gear The highest / fastest gear is the smallest in back and the largest in front If in doubt post a picture of what you think the fastest gear is



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