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22

Details depend on the ride, but usually organized rides provide things that you'd have to provide yourself. This one appears to provide a lot. This is covered by the catchall term "support", as in a supported ride. The support that everyone enjoys is the food and drink along the way ("The Best Rest Stops") - scroll down on the page you linked, and you'll ...


9

What to do: Eat well, but don't overdo it. A hearty meal the night before and a solid breakfast the morning of the ride are a must. Stay well-hydrated. Get plenty of sleep. If you've been burning the midnight oil lately, cut back on your riding and catch more z's. Feel free to ride, but go for less distance and intensity than you normally would. Lube ...


9

I'm going to answer this as a true couch to century with a general plan. You can write books on this stuff. There have been books written on this stuff. You have three major goals for a successful century: Get the raw fitness needed to keep the pedals going for 6+ hours. Figure out how much you need to eat while going for the entire thing. Do the above ...


9

I haven't done one of those big organized rides yet, but signed up for a local one in May (and a multi-day fundraising ride in September) and have volunteered helping out with some of that kind of ride before. Most basically, those events usually make it easier and let you concentrate on riding. "Heavy bicycle traffic" is also probably a good chance to ...


7

Nothing - you're not missing anything; going out and riding 100 miles on your own is fine, but going out on an organised ride is a different experience. Maybe it's about the camaraderie, following someone else's route, not having to think about the route - just follow the signs or the provided GPX, the provided rest stops, mechanical support, accurate ...


7

Take a "short cut". I commonly take a "short cut" on my 10-mile commute, riding up to a neighboring community and then down a bike trail, adding another 17 miles. Added: The advantage to this is that you're already dressed and on your bike, so the time required will be ONLY the additional time you actually spend on your bike. Get going 90 minutes earlier ...


6

Rather than targeting a C (which I assume means you want to participate in a race and be "competitive"), maybe you should consider touring instead. Slower paced, non-competitive, emphasizes simply enjoying the ride. Can be day trips or weeks long, road or trail, self-contained or supported, alone or in a group.


6

I wouldn't bother adding in the commute miles. You should be focusing on getting your ride distances up, rather than nickle-and-diming a mile here or there. I went through one of these training routines for a charity ride 7 years ago; just follow their schedule and you'll get there. These things are tried and true. Hundreds of riders use them every year.


5

Make sure you get plenty of sleep, eat about normally, and ride less -- mostly just enough to stretch your legs, with maybe one semi-hard ride to tire you out somewhat. If you do that, do it early in the week though, so the last few days before the century you can take it easy and be fully recovered by the day of the big ride. Ideally you'd have done ...


3

I carry: Two water bottles (on accelerade, one Nuun) Tail wedge, with multi-tool, patch kit, tire levers, spare tube, CO2 inflator, emergency food (sport beans), wallet, keys. Bento box with cell phone, drugs (salt tablets, ibuprofen, sinus) Pump mounted on one water bottle cage. jersey pockets with powdered accelerate, Nuun tablets, real food. I'll ...


3

This Cycleops document appears to show the speed-power curve for the Magneto trainer. A few comments: first, the actual power demanded will depend on the pressure between the tire and roller, so you will want to make sure that is consistent between trainer sessions. Second, note that the power increases roughly linearly with speed, so if you double your ...


3

I've ridden many sportives at this distance in the UK and here is my experience. Food/Drink Looking at the route map there are 3 food stops and 11 water stops so you don't need to carry loads with you. I'd say a 750ml bottle will do. If you find you drink a lot on your training rides then take a second bottle. Food will be available at the stops but you ...


3

It really depends on what you're normally used to and what your aim for the century is. If a century is a big deal for you (that isn't meant to be patronising) I would think that your training schedule will have been slowly building up the miles over the previous few months, throwing in occasional shorter and sharper rides for a bit of variety (never ...


3

I once went for a recognition ride on a race track for a competition just a day before the actual event. The track was exactly the same, it was already marked and it did not cross any fence or busy street (it was a pure mountain biking race). Of course, I went to the competition the next day. The biggest difference was purely psychological, but big enough ...


2

Organized rides are great. You get a lot of support in terms of rest stops, mechanical help, and medical assistance. A subset of this is charity rides. These are particularly nice because there are often people along the route cheering for you at various points along the way. On the other hand, riding solo is more challenging and you get the choose your ...


2

if you're re-injuring, you have some technique problems. number one knee strain is gear mashing, known as pushing too high a gear: http://adventure.howstuffworks.com/outdoor-activities/triathlons/training/mashing-vs-spinning.htm see also sheldonbrown.com/fixed-knees.html work on pedaling form, know as cadence and spinning, so as not to strain your knees: ...


2

I would agree that a short ride on Saturday is useful to keep things ticking over, resting on the Friday, so long as the substitute commute isn't too stressful, might be more useful. Your body needs some down time and a 'clean' 24+ hours is quite important for genuine recovery. The thing to do on the Saturday is to use the short ride as a dress rehearsal, ...


2

Ignore the commute miles and follow the training schedule. Maybe take it just a bit easier on your commute for the days with a training ride than you normally would. Whatever you do, don't give up the commutes. They help maintain your fitness throughout the week. I have never been in as good of shape as when I was training and commuting simultaneously.


1

In addition to items listed in previous answers, I think it would be very beneficial to bring a couple of small (9 ml) packets of Chamois cream and re-apply as needed at the rest stops. This will reduce a lot of chaffing.


1

I never carry anything special on Centuries. I carry water and Clif bars but I carry that stuff anyway. The one thing I do differently is eat and drink more. It sounds like you have plenty of stops at good intervals. Make sure to eat a lot at each one of those whether you're hungry or not. I wouldn't take any clothes. You'll be fine. We wear clothes all ...


1

I did my first 100 miles in October, I didn't train enough and it was extremely painful and unpleasant. Get the miles in or suffer like hell. You have been warned.


1

I'd recommend getting the book "Crunch Time Cyclist" by Chris Carmichael. There is a review here for more details. www.roadcycling.co.nz/Coach/cycling-book-the-time-crunched-cyclist.html He has a specific 10 week program for novices raising their training to Century rides, but he covers so much more as well, background, nutrition etc. I'm sure you could ...


1

Yes, there are "couch to century" training plans. Depending on your problem, a century can be easier on your knee than a marathon since the maximal force during cycling is lower than during running. Here is a link to a typical "10-week" training plan. If you search around a bit you can find training plans from 8 weeks up to perhaps 14 weeks.


1

In my opinion, the amount of taper you need is directly proportional to how much time you expect to ride at high intensity. The more high intensity you need, so the taper. For example, usually taper is more important for event such as short prologue, fast track rides than longer ones. If you expect to stay at a relative low/moderate intensity for the whole ...



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