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13

The short answer to your first question is "the power savings from using ceramic bearings compared to good steel bearings is almost zero." The short answer to your second question is "yes, it is possible to measure the difference but it's not easy." The longer answer, and the support for the shorter answers is below. First, however, it depends a little on ...


5

I don't have the source at hand, but from what I've read, converting your wheel bearings to ceramic will net you something like a 1 W savings at racing speeds, thanks to reduced mechanical losses. A ceramic bottom bracket would result in less improvement. Considering the rider is putting out 200+ W at racing speed, the savings are clearly minor. Additional ...


4

I have ridden ceramic BB bearings. This is my one and only experience. They seemed to take a couple rides to break-in which definitely seemed odd. One of my training partners noticed the same thing, but in his case, it was after 90 minutes that the bearings seemed to spin freely. I rode them for just shy of a year, which is approximately the same usage I ...


4

Yes, you can. You just need to get the right size of loose ceramic ball bearings as that's what shimano wheels use. They are available from various vendors, like here for instance. You didn't ask this, but I'll answer it for you anyway: would I recommend replacing the bearings on a pair of WH-R550's with ceramic bearings? No, and neither would many others. ...


2

I don't think it's so much that they wick away water as that there's more friction to be had when wet. I haven't personally had ceramic rims before, but everything I've heard and read leads me to believe that folks who ride often in bad weather prefer them once they've tried them, due to easier braking.


1

I have not done this myself but from what I've gathered it should be fine. The green pads are likely harder so they last longer and/or less likely to "gum up" the rim. Running the wrong pads with ceramic rims- which are especially hard- isn't like running the wrong pads on carbon rims- which are especially soft.


1

There are a lot of small boutique-factories machining extra-weight-weenie parts that serve three purposes: Provide some weight advantage to very high-end racers who reached the limit of their training levels. That could mean positions in a very high-level race; Satisfy some folks (whose population is increasing) who don't mind throwing money out the window ...


1

The material that the bearings are made of is only one piece of the whole mechanical package. I've worked on bikes in the shop that had ceramic BB's and all sorts of steel. From a material point of view, ceramic has the possibility to be better, but as others have noted, you pay a large premium...and often they may not be the best anyway. Think of it this ...


1

Since the current answers are very road specific, I'll give my take on it for the disciplines I know. Downhilling can benefit from them because they deform less under load, so in theory last longer. But in practice BBs and hub bearings in this discipline tend to fail from corrosion brought on by failed seals, and although ceramic bearings won't rust - the ...



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