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0

Bike radar did a pretty good article on this, which you can find here. My personal opinion is Carbon Drives/Shaft drive are quite fancy but pretty useless. They are more expensive, require specific frames which are usually quite expensive, and their try to solve a problem that simply does not exist. With a carbon/shaft you can only run a single gear hub ...


0

I ran into this exact problem. In my case, it was buying 9-speed chain for an 8-speed drivetrain— I didn't realize backward compatibility was an issue.


0

Check and see if your cranks can move side-to-side. You might need to loosen the left crankark, push it on all the way and re-tighten.


0

Good answers above. Most likely a worn sprocket, but could also be that your B-tension on the rear deraileur is insufficient, causing the chain to not wrap as far around the cassette cogs as it should, which would make the problem worse. Increasing B-tension will cause the deraileur's guide pulley to come closer to the cassette, thereby engaging more chain ...


0

Pedaling while stand up is not something you should or should not do. It is harder for your body because it increases heart rate, but gives you instant power and is even necessary for some obstacles of technical climbs on MTB. Sometimes you need to go over that rock, sometimes you don't have the time to shift and just want to accelerate right away. Every ...


0

Back in the seventies and eighties it wasn't uncommon to remove the inner chainring from bikes used on flat time trials to save weight. Often the chain length was set intentionally on the long side to reduce friction, which had the undesirable side effect of making it easier to rop the chain. At the same time it was generally considered to be a good idea ...


-1

If you have an elliptical bottom bracket you won't need a tensioner. Ditto for dropouts that allow horizontal movement. If you are very lucky even a vertical dropout frame won't need a tensioner but as chains stretch over time this probably won't hold true for long. When the chain is too short you will have parts of the crank rotation that are very stiff. ...


1

You don't need a chain tensioner (by this, you presumably mean something like the Surly Tuggnut and not a pulley which will snap on a fixie). This article from Lennard Zinn (or equivalently, the one he cites from Sheldon Brown) covers how to tension your chain.


0

I have a built myself a single chainring bike and I'm just having this problem. Bike ran fine for the first month now the chain jumps off the chainring when on the smaller sprockets. I had a dodgy link in the chain which was giving too much flex so I replaced that and it seems to run better so chain your chain but the problem is still there. In response to ...


4

That chain connector is not only for single speed, but I believe it is for 1/8" chains as well, so you may have a track chain, which is not meant for multi-speed drivetrains. If it's not an 1/8" chain, and is instead a 3/32" chain, and your drive train is 8 speed or less, you can just replace the master link and you should be good to go. The master links ...


3

Yes you have the wrong part. Count the number of cogs in the cassette / freewheel. Get a chain for that number of speeds. Probably a 9 speed.


-2

If you change your chain you must change the cassette or you're looking for problems. The chain basically molds the cassette and when you put a new one on, it's fresh but the cogs are shaped by your old worn out chain. So the new chain will not work well with the old, worn cassette.


3

As long as it's a 9-speed power-link, you can. I have chains in all bikes connected this way and find it most convenient method. The one made by SRAM is also the easiest to open.


3

The most common way is to use a "Chain Wear Indicator Gauge" tool. (google for product pages). If you don't have access to (or don't want to buy) one, you can use a ruler: http://sheldonbrown.com/brandt/chain-care.html


4

Every new 9 spd chain I have bought came out of the box with 0.5% wear according to the Park CC2 chain checker. I replace my chains when they start to show any wear (i.e. 0.75 %), because chains are cheap and the rest of the drive train is not. You have to be aware that just because a measuring tool has different measurements, it does not mean the tool has ...


7

Its up to personal preference at the end of the day, but a general recommendation is to replace at (or before) the 0.5% point for 11 speed and 0.75% for 10 speed or lower. You can also see if theres something in the chain manual or chain wear gauge's manual. The multiple indicators are there because some people will want to change at 0.5%, others at 0.75% ...



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