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Why would you need chains and cassettes that cost in excess of 300 dollars? Several reasons: You're a professionally sponsored racer, money is no object and you want to cut every gram of weight possible. You have way too much money (generally, people who buy top end equipment fall into this group). It looks cool among a certain crowd. In picking your ...


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I have had this happen due to a worn rear derailleur spring. the rear derailleur isn't able to take up the slack fast enough. also check your chain line, bent rear derailleur hanger, front derailleur cage alignment. see if you can fit a chain catcher on your bike.


5

Cogs and chains "wear together" (regardless of whether they are front rings or rear sprockets). The old chain does not slip on the ring, because the old chain's rollers are worn down. They have an overall smaller diameter than the rollers of a new chain, and also a different shape: new rollers are cylinders, but worn ones look like small pulleys, they have ...


2

Yes a new chain can skip in either an old chain ring or old cassette. The length between chain lengths needs to match. So the old chain matched up to the old ring. The new chain does not match up with the old chain ring. I suspect the middle chain ring looks worn. If so for sure time to replace it. What do I need to know to buy new chainrings for ...


6

I expect that after 10,000 km your chainring also needs to be replaced (frankly, I find it astonishing that you made it that far without replacing anything else. That's amazing.). Am I correct in guessing that you spend most of your time in your middle chainring? If so, it will be significantly more worn than your large or small rings, which would explain ...


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The work they did doesn't require the chain to be removed (as others have mentioned). It could be a defect but once again, the prices of chain are way to cheap to worry about it. Given the volume of chain SRAM puts out, one in a million chance. The rest of the chain is fine however so remove the broken link and keep on riding. When adding links, chain ...


0

Chances are they misaligned the gears a little. I've snapped a few new chains and the most common circumstance is after I've messed with my gear indexing (I'd say "sorting out" but breaking a chain indicates it didn't work). There IS a chance that it's just a bad chain but it's also possible you did something wrong too. I'd call the bike shop and tell them ...


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In an emergency, you could always push out the pin of the next link (not fully, obiously) and reattach it where you removed the first pin. You'd lose a link (and possibly a gear) but you'd be able to ride home.


2

I always carry the cutoff from a new chain (or a few links of it) in my kit. Take the chain apart at the next link down from where you lost the pin (being more careful this time) and then take two half-links from the cutoff and install them. And, while you have that cutoff piece handy, do a trial to see how many turns of the crank it it is to take the pin ...


6

What type of chain - Shimano have chain connector pins for exactly this task for many of their chains. Note the pin must exactly match the chain. If you have a length of the same chain (I always keep the left overs when I put ion a new chain) break the chain again and remake the chain with the leftovers. I have (in desperation - bike shops 100km away, no ...


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Had just this problem to the extent where when the chain was over the large cogs, front and rear, the derailleur was excessively stretched. The changes operated OK, but noticed that the changes weren't smooth when on the larger front cog. Changes on the rear derailleur operated with a bit of clicking and hesitation not dissimilar to an indexing problem. I ...


8

If you think about it, the purpose of oiling is to lubricate where you have metal moving against metal. So in the diagram below: you need to oil the pin/roller area. There's no point oiling the face plates (which I think is what you're saying?). When you oil, know how many links are in the chain (or mark your start link), and go around the whole chain ...


7

To quote Sheldon Brown: "If the chain is too short, it will be at risk for jamming and possibly ruining the rear derailer if you accidentally shift into the large-large combination. Never run with a chain that is too short, except in an emergency." (I will say that depending on if your chain is short enough, it can happen in combos other than large-large.) ...


1

Personal advice, don't clean it. Let it collect dirt first. Eventually there will come a time that you'll clean it depending on your use. Then you degrease and apply your preferred lube. Saves you time and money.


1

Many bicycle chains use different platings for the inner and outer links. Inner links are typically plated with a nickel/Teflon surface. Outer links will only get a nickel plating. The extra Teflon coating helps the inner surface of the chain glide over the cogs on the cassette. Here is a video of the manufacture process: ...


6

You may want to read up on how to tune a rear derailluer, but if you just want to get going, all that is needed is a minor adjustment using the barrel screw (clearly seen in the video) where the cable comes in. Turn the screw clockwise 1/4 turn at a time, and the chain will move away from the cog (The cassette is the full set of cogs). Trick is not to make ...


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I just put more bearing grease on, then coated it with Bel Ray chain lube to protect it. I have a new JT 420 chain on my Jai Ling NP 50 bike. The bike goes up and down a 45 degree hill every day. The old chain showed severe wear after 2500 miles. I did not want to snap it. The new chain was only 20 bucks! I lube this weekly, inspect daily, and tighten until ...


1

The new ones for 10-speed and 11-speed are frequently single-use. I buy KMC chains and half-links these days to avoid the possibility of that happening.


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According to the Shimano document SI-6R3FA-002, FD-M191 works with the Acera M360 groupset, which is 8 speed, whereas FD-M590 is a 9 speed component.


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According to the data sheets for the FD-M191 and FD-M590, you should be able to run one for another provided the difference between the middle and largest cog is at least 12 teeth. The first thing to check is if you've adjusted the front derailleur properly. Are you using a reasonable gear combination when its rubbing? If so, are you using a 9 speed chain? ...


6

Normally this would be a simple "take it back to the bike shop" situation, as the bike has not been assembled correctly. But unfortunately you probably have a bicycle shaped object (BSO) that you bought in a box (or was assembled by the proverbial "moron in a hurry"). It's likely that even a BSO can be made to work after a fashion. However you may find that ...


0

I have experience with DNP freewheels (7 speed, 11-28) and KMC 6-7 speed chains. I had exactly the same chain slip problem (literally word for word) with chain slipping and managed to fix it with great deal of attention to the derailleur setup. You might think that your rear derailleur setup is good because of the evidence provided by good shifting. That ...



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