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1

The only study I know of concluded that cross chaining in relatively modern 9spd gear systems at the angles typical of bicycles had no measurable effect on the efficiency of the gearing system. Even back in the bad old days of 52/42 with five cogs in the back, I never worried about cross chaining. Use the gears you like and replace the chain when it starts ...


0

Ascertain that the chain is not visibly touching the front derailleur. Check that your rear cassette is fitted correctly; lock-ring is tight and the correct spacers used between sprockets. Are you using a matching chain, chain rings and rear derailleur? i.e. are they all 'n' speed; i.e. do not mix and match a 9 speed chain with a 11 speed cassette or ...


0

Depending on the geometry of your frame, the noise could very well be caused by cross chaining, especially if you have very short chain stays. If you've ruled out rubbing, and this is in fact the problem, you don't have many options unfortunately. You can pick a cassette/crank combination that ensures you spend most of your time riding in the middle of ...


1

An old thread but recently my friend broke his chain because he was cross chaining (big big) up a hill. You could imagine the stress of the chain and cogs under a heavy load.


0

So you might be about two links short, or you could move the wheel forward. The purpose of the adjusters is to make it easy to position the wheel. The tension on the quick release skewer is what actually keeps the wheel in place. From what you describe it sounds like the skewer wasn't generating enough tension. Try this: Locate the wheel where you want it ...


0

If you've got a Shimano chain it's unlikely that you've got a master link as most Shimano chains come with a one-time use connecting pin. You can pop this back out with a chain tool. It's not practical to easily remove it without the tool. You can replace with a kmc missing link (make sure you match it for the right chain) for easy disassembly in the future. ...


0

Very easy! Get a good cutter and slice the derailleur cage. (Without a picture can't say it for sure, but I bet your derailleur isn't repairable if it bent so much that it prevent your crank movement).


3

The pictures I've found of the FD-TY18 look like the pin across the rear of the cage is riveted in place. So, you probably can't remove it without a bit of work – through if the derailleur is damaged beyond repair it probably won't be too hard to either pry it apart (try holding with a screwdriver and twisting one side with pliers) or to cut it (and do ...


2

I'm a little puzzled by the threads that look like they should draw the hub's axle back to tension the chain. They don't appear like they can move, but it also doesn't look like there is a nut on them to pull the axel back. Do you know if they thread into the frame, or are they free to slide? That said, it appears that the load on the mechanism would tend ...


1

Try something specifically designed for seized parts. PBlaster or Kroil come to mind. Whatever you do, definitely exhaust the non-mechanical remedies before you get out the breaker bar!


-1

I had the exact same problem and it was due to broken teeth on one of the chain rings. Inspect your chain rings and look for worn or frankly broken cogs. Replace the chain ring.


-1

If its really bad you can use auto body degreaser. Dont use it all the time though. Also simple green works great.



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