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1

I'm going with the KMC X10 line of chains, in particular, the KMC X10.93 chain, looks like around $25, as my "one chain to drive them all" for my 9 and 10 speed rear derailleur bike collection of Shimano drive train bikes. After it arrives, I'll post an update with the experience-based results on my 9 speed bikes.


0

So this bike at one time had a derailleur, right? But you only want to ride with one of two rear cogs now? And whichever you choose, you'd stick with that one for the whole ride? If so, I'd be inclined to pop an inexpensive derailleur on there to provide the correct chain tension in either cog. Then I'd just use the derailleur limit adjustment screws to ...


3

I found a site a while ago called Velosolo, the guy who runs it seems to be quite knowledgeable about conversions, and he has a couple of kits on there - you might be able to get away with ripping your cassette off and replacing it with a cog and a bunch of spacers. Because of the vertical dropouts you'd still need to tension the chain somehow (the obvious ...


3

If you poke around on the web enough, you'll find a "magical" gear ratio calculator somewhere. You input the length from BB to dropout and it spits out the front/back combos that will work w/o a tensioner. Try this one. http://eehouse.org/fixin/fixmeup.php It would be much simpler to change the front chainring, if you can find a magical combo that ...


2

Sounds like you have multi-speed cassette, no derailleur, and no chain tensioner. On the 18T you have good chain tension. Even in this set up as the chain stretches you will get slack on the 18T. Moving to the 16T is not full chain link. A horizontal drop out is typically a little longer then one chain link. If you get all the way back and have slack ...


1

You can simply add a cheap chain tensioner and be done with it. The chain line will most likely not be ideal anyway if you left the entire cassette on there, so that shouldn't be a concern.


4

As far as I'm aware, Shimano and SRAM cassettes are interchangable, at least in the 8 and 9 speed range. Your derailleur should be fine. As far as the chain goes, depending on how worn it is, you might want to replace it with a new one. Mixing a worn chain with a new cassette is a sure way to wear out the cassette prematurely. Also, this is a good ...


5

When you have a multi-speed setup, the derailleur handles all responsibility of maintaining chain tension. The Cross-check frame has the semi-horizontal dropouts so it can be utilized for single speed applications, and it's only for those applications that you control chain tension by wheel spacing. Where the wheel goes in the dropouts for a multi-speed ...


0

You don't say what derailleur and shifter you have, but if they are an indexed Campagnolo system the spacing they're designed for is different in the middle of the cassette to the ends. I had exactly these symptoms with a 10-speed Campagnolo cassette on a SRAM bike. You will have an array of problems if the mech and shifter's idea of cable pull do not ...


4

It seems you're missing the 'tensioners'‡. They go on each side of the axle with the cap hooked on the end of the dropout. You can then adjust the tension of the chain by fastening or loosening the nut on the end (first loosen the axle nut, of course). Chain tensioners by 1-1111. Not all bikes have these, though. ‡: I couldn't find the ...


7

Move the wheel back in the dropout. Equal on both sides. Go for 1/2 to 1 inch of play in the chain. And that valve stem might be leaning a bit. Probably not enough to matter but ideally it is straight.



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