New answers tagged

0

In addition, 1/8" chain doesn't flex sideways like 3/32" chain does, so while its unsuitable for derailleurs, its great for tandem timing chains, and for single-speeds. The lack of flex also contributes to its durability.


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I'm pretty sure that the rear derailleur is not tensioning the chain properly. The pedal power is making the chain to bounce on the drivetrain, and causing the chain to fall. The crack sound - I suspect that the bouncing chain is going back to the chainring and catching the teeth. I'm surprised that the bike shop is not catching the problem.


5

This answer has been significantly changed since being accepted because the accepted answer cannot be deleted. Based on the new photo, your timing chain needs checking. Its quite uncommon to see both chains on the right side of the bike, but not impossible. Do both timing chainrings have the same number of teeth, or do pedals go out of phase over distance ...


12

You almost made it... Obviously bottom long line should run straight to crankset. You will feel some spring tension when you route the chain.


0

The chain that comes in from the bottom right of the photo should pass around the idler gear it currently runs to clockwise (which it is doing), between the two idler gears, around the other idler gear counterclockwise, then to the bottom of the cassette, around the cassette clockwise, and off to the top of the front chain ring.


4

Evidence, not sure. I can say I've used the Park Tool chain cleaner, which is pretty much a bath, along with Simple Green solvent for years with no problems whatsoever. It does completely remove the chain lube/grease, which is the point. When I clean the chain I want all the old lube off, along with the grit and dirt in the lube. As long as you remove ...


4

A 1x specific chain is designed with 2 different width specifications. On a standard chain, only the spacing between the inside plates matters. The 1x specific chains are made to fit a narrow/wide chainring, which means that the spacing between both inside plates and outer plates must be within tolerance. It only matters if you are running a 1x ...


3

General Note: Chains should match the speed they are manufactured for, in order to work correctly (ie, 11sp drivetrains require 11sp chains, etc). This is due to the different spacings on the cassette from one size to another: 11sp cassettes have narrower sprocket spacing than 10sp cassettes, so 11sp drivetrains require narrower chains as a result. Specific ...


3

It's possible that during cleaning a grain of sand, for example, has become stuck in the chain causing a stiff link which does not travel cleanly over the cogs. Cleaning chains and cogs often involves a significant amount of moving dirt around before extracting it. A simple test for this is to move the chain through both hands bending every link. You'll ...


2

There are a few possibilities here: 1) Cleaning the cassette took away the gunk keeping a slightly worn cassette from showing. If you use the middle gears most, they may be more worn than the rest. Unlikely, but not impossible. 2) You bent the derailleur hanger or derailleur cage when removing or cleaning. More likely than #1, and easy to test. 3) Check ...


5

For a generator you will probably want two sets of gears. Cyclists normally pedal at about 90-110rpm, and getting a small generator to work efficiently normally means spinning at 1000's of rpm. I used a "drill pump" to make a pedal powered pump once and that was designed to spin at 1800rpm. But it used 500W or more at that speed, so I spun it at about ...


1

I have been recently looking into the question of measuring chain wear, and in particular, using a 12" steel rule, or ruler. The 12" ruler I have has markings at one tenth of an inch, so I found it easier to measure a 10 inch section of the chain, then the critical 1% wear equates to one tenth of an inch, (which is 1% of ten inches). When measuring the ...


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Your cassette is worn and needs replacing too. I bet the old chain was well past replacement time, and it wore into the cassette. Now you've changed the chain, it no-longer makes good contact with all the teeth at once. Stop riding immediately - fit a replacement cassette ASAP else you'll be up for another new chain. Do use the search functions of this ...


3

It is likely that your cassette is worn. A new chain on a worn cassette will skip, because of the mismatch of the shape of the teeth on the cassette with the chain's spacing (which is shorter than what the cassette expects due to wear). You can visually inspect your cassette for wear by either looking for gaps in how the chain meshes with the cassette, ...



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