Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

almost the same by me just i found the problem and it cuold be the same for yours one of the links from the chain is bent out of shape (use a flat screw driver to bend it back in shape)


0

One possible and modern solution is: none. Go 1x10 or 1x11 with a narrow wide chain ring and a RD with a clutch.


2

You could try the "soak chain in paraffin wax" method. That would at least keep the water out of the rollers. Good how to page: http://www.instructables.com/id/Lubricating-a-Bicycle-Chain-using-Paraffin/ It's cheap and is likely as good as anything else. Salt water will pretty much destroy every part of a bicycle, washing with fresh water every day ...


1

There is actually very little value in lubricating the chain, all you really need is to keep it clean and rust free. Kerosene seems about as good as anything for doing that. The primary reason to lubricate a chain is to keep water out of the rollers and just generally keep the chain rust free. Most of the things people put on chains actually shorten the ...


2

It would only be effective if the chain was wet lubed, and clean. As a solvent Kerosene thin and redistributed the lubricant already on the chain. It will therefore have an effect at lubricating the chain as the pressure points will get lube migrating to them, provided small enough amounts were use that the lubricant was not washed off the chain. Using ...


7

Kerosene is technically a paraffin which comes from the greek word wax. Kerosene is used as a fuel and a solvent. A waxy solid extracted from petroleum is called paraffin wax. Pouring a liquid kerosene on a chain is not going to leave much if any waxy lubricant behind. Kerosene is not a good choice as a solvent as it is flammable. ...


6

Kerosene is good as a cleaner for your chain, but never as a lubricant. In fact, kerosene will clean all the lubricant remaining, increasing friction.


6

No, Kerosene won't leave behind enough of a layer to protect the chain. It might be useful as a solvent to clean the chain before applying a proper lubricant.


0

I went to my favorite cycle mechanic and he dropped kerosene on the derailleur and then brushed the dirt off easily.


3

I ended up taking my bike to Dickie at Waverley Cycles. I had a couple of problems: The chain was too long (I hadn't removed enough links) The cable adjuster on the derailleur had stripped threads so had movement He shortened the chain, screwed the adjuster further in and used the adjusters on the cable stops near the front of the bike to tune it and ...


2

The best ones by far: Shimano TL-CN40, TL-CN41 or TL-CN42. Unique amongst chain tools in that they are as accurate as the ruler method, with the ease and quickness of the slot in tools. They are the only "tool" to do this, i.e. they measure pin wear only, roller wear (which does not matter) is eliminated. Not cheap though, but they are the best and ...


5

There's not much you can do against the evil trifecta of salt, water, and sand. You can use a teflon, graphite, or moly based dry lube but inevitably sand particles are going to gouge the metal and salt+water is going to start corrosion. The problem with chain wear due to sand is that the chains themselves can look good (i.e., not rusty on the outside), ...


0

Here's an interesting thought. If you're tall like me 6.4 or higher and you also have a lot of power, you could end up like me, where the only bikes you can ride are single speeds which have bigger chains and cogs with bigger teeth. If I take a geared bike and pedal it as hard as I can, usually in 32/18 or 32/20 the torque from my long legs will be enough ...


1

You can use a wax based lube instead of an oil/teflon based lube. Your chain and cassette will always be clean, however, you will have to apply the wax lube much more often. I do it every second day (40-60km/day). This might seem like a pain, but applying lube is so much easier than cleaning the cassette/chain. Also, there will be no black on your chain ever ...


-2

My solution for bike chains is constant, low-key maintenance. This avoids having a huge mess to deal with. I think of it like tooth-brushing - do a little every day and you will never have a major problem. Avoid it for weeks, and you will need heavy-duty intervention! I have written a post about this approach, complete with videos. It's aimed at average ...


0

It depends on how far below freezing you are riding. In close to freezing temperatures, where slush and muck are an issue, a wet lube offers better protection despite it's increased viscosity and resistance. At colder temperatures where slush is no longer an issue (15F/-10C) you should consider a dry lube. It will offer less resistance while riding and ...



Top 50 recent answers are included