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0

So to first answer the direct questions you asked: The chain falling off the front chainring will harm the chainring and/or the chain only if you are pedaling hard at the time it falls off. Getting the chain back on the ways you are describing shouldn't harm any part of the bicycle as long as you aren't pedaling hard as you shift, which I'm sure you're ...


3

You didn't mention what gauge you used, but there are many kinds. Take a look at that link; it is worth reading, as is this thread. The current smoothness of the shifting isn't usually the deciding factor regarding when to change, but rather the cost of the other components that wear faster when the chain is worn: the cassette, and the front chainwheels. ...


8

The short correct answer is: replace it now. If you want to gamble with your cassette, you could try and "squeeze another few hundred miles out". Even though it still shifts fine, the spacing for the cassette is becoming increasingly mismatched. The cassette will likely wear to this new spacing and eventually you'll have to replace it to get it to work ...


0

I HIGHLY doubt this, but it could be possible that you are running a compact chainring set-up on cranks originally set up for triple chain-rings. I derped around with this before, and noticed that the chain would slip from the big-ring into a void between the two chain-rings and make you spin endlessly, creating a horrifically loud and embarrassing grinding ...


0

It turns out that the issue was caused by a worn shifter cable casing -- the plastic tubing. LBS replaced it at around a fifth of the price of replacing the cassette and/or chain gears, and everything works like a charm now.


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For a single speed bike I used a chain with 112 links and cut it. You could just count the links of the old chain.


1

Usually there is just one length available with a bit over 100 links. Of course you have to shorten it so that it’s not slack on the smallest gear combination and not too tight (i.e. breaking the rear derailleur) on the biggest gear combination.


1

Unfortunately it depends a lot on the specific manufacturer. I usually get around 1500 km (or more) out of SRAM and Shimano chains. I always buy the least expensive option and usually 9 speeds. (All of my bikes are 3x9 speed mountain bikes) And I ride mountain trails in muddy or otherwise very humid conditions. I clean after each ride if needed, but when ...


3

This is the best test of chain wear I know of: it's in german, but the graph should speak for itself. His comment: "Chains were used under subjectively similar conditions - with exception of SRAM PC69 which, in nice conditions, lives for 1500-1800km" Personally I think I rode unknown KMC, Shimano (probably HG-53), and afer having stumbled upon said ...


2

I get 5000 to 10000 kilometers from mid-priced 20€ Campagnolo C9 chains. I would say this is money well spent. Of course, as other answers state, riding conditions and maintenance do effect the chain life. In my experience SRAM and KMC chains are nowhere near as durable with similar maintenance.


7

No. The only advantage of expensive chains within a specific brand is the minor reduction in weight. The ones with extra plating do look nicer and provide some corrosion resistance, but it takes almost no effort to keep your chain rust free. There are differences between various manufacturers, but in general those relate to shifting and how the quicklinks ...


2

Your cassette and possibly chainwheels are worn out. When a chain wears, the cogs wear down together with it and will not mesh correctly with a new chain. Worn cogs do not look like the teeth would be actually wearing down. Instead, the teeth get narrower and eventually develop an asymmetric "shark fin" shape. If you do not know exactly what to look for, a ...


1

Pedaling while changing gears in important to avoid damage to derailleur and chain. Gear shifting proper technique by Sheldon Brown. Shift the gears so that chain is on the middle chain ring(at the pedals) and approximately on the middle gear on the cassette. Verify that the derailer with the chain is vertical, if not adjust accordingly. Also, it is ...


1

I have been having a similar problem of ghost shifting on my full suspension mountain bike. This first started after breaking my chain on a ride. When I replaced the chain, I also decided to replace my rear derailleur cables and their sleeves. After noticing the symptoms I ended up replacing the rear cassette based on advice from a bike shop. Following ...



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