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2

I ran into this problem after getting my bike back from a basic tune-up. It was especially bad for the 3 largest cogs. After over an hour of investigating and tinkering I discovered this gem from the Shimano Derailleur Installation Manual Some tension pulleys have an arrow on them to indicate the direction of rotation. In such cases, install the pulley ...


0

I would go for the 116 link chain just so that you have a little extra spare in case something goes wrong.


1

I would think that both these are from different manufacturers, or maybe slightly different product lines (DuraAce vs. Ultegra). I can't think of why a manufacturer would bother shipping 2 identical chains with one only having 2 links more than the other. Choose one based on some other criteria such as which brand you trust more, or which is actually ...


3

If your old chain was sized appropriately for your drivetrain, and you're not changing anything, then you're going to shorten the new chain to the length of the old chain (via counting links, or lying the chains on the ground and pinching them together). Then, you throw the remaining links into your tool box in case of needing them as spares for a repair in ...


1

Rear derailleur adjustment can be a really pain in the neck. What is more likely happening is that you have to adjust the B screw: B-Screw Adjustment After setting the L-screw, check the "B-screw" for an adequate setting. The B-screw controls the derailleur body angle, hence the name, B-screw. You can find detailed information about all the setting ...


0

The screw adjustment you point the camera to @20s needs to be turned in. This will rotate the derailleur away from the chain stay. The screw pushes against a protrusion on the derailleur body.


2

I've been using the same missing link on a KMC x10sl for 3 years. I may have opened it around 40-50 times. No problem. Note that I use the proper tool to open it (KMC Missing Link Chain Pliers):


6

Yes. Most sorts of reusable link generally have a "snap in" position that the link pops into when you pull on the chain. Between normal chain tension and design, the link should stay in that position. However, with repeated use, you can wear the portion of the link that is tight enough to keep the link in the running/together position. This means the ...


0

They just take a bit of tugging to "click" into place. I had to put a foot on the pedal and then pull the chain with both hands to get it to lock in.


1

You probably have the right drop out width. Unless it has down tube shifters you have cable routing. The chain size must match (e.g. cassette number of gears) and chain ring width. Your existing chain rings are probably too wide. But I think you would be better off finding a newer used bike with the stuff you want. If you stay with the same number of gears ...


2

It all depends on how long your chain is currently. Also it depends on if your rear derailleur is a short or mid cage. I would say that a jump up from 24 to 32 is a bit to big for any chain. Of course without seeing how much slack is in your chain right now the right answer will vary. You certainly can put the new cassette on and you will know right away if ...


1

Most likely the free hub is sticking. The grease can get old and sticky. Service the hub. Lots of videos on youtube. Or take the hub to a shop. And you can wear out a hub - some parts are serviceable. Sticky hub is not likely to break a chain but it is a problem that needs to be corrected.


0

For overall chain length (to decide on the number of links required when fitting a new chain) use published methods (eg wrap it over the two biggest cogs - not going through the rear derailleur, add two links to get the correct length - the count includes the joining link; this is the Shimano method for a double chainset but works fine for me with a triple). ...


0

First of all, it's not right to measure new chain by old chain, as old chain stretched, and is longer than needed. Here (sheldon brown) you can find about chain length. Does your chain skipping on some cogs, or at all the cogs? If it skips at some cogs, you should probably replace cassette. If it skips at all cogs, your chain probably bad or too long.



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