New answers tagged

0

I apply the wax lube whenever my chain 'sounds' dry. When I hear a bit more noise than usual I know it is time. Although with lubrication, the more frequent the better as increased wear occurs when there is not enough. First, I use a rag (t-shirt, old sock, paper towel) to clean the dirty wax globs off the chain and chainrings. Then I apply the wax lube to ...


1

You might not be installing the pin correctly. It sounds as if you did not reach the seating point or past it. Here is an article on Shimano chain installation (See drawings). http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help/chain-installation-derailleur-bikes


0

I am surprised that I didn't see it already. I use a hot parafin wax bath to both clean and lubricate my chain. It's simple to do, and pretty cheap when all is said and done. Materials: $9 mini crockpot from Walmart $2 canning wax from Publix (or your local supermarket). Set up crockpot and turn on high. Add blocks of wax and let melt. This will take a ...


2

It's worth experimenting with different products and methods. There is no 'one size fits all' solution. It depends on your components and the oil you use, how often you clean your bike and what with, the type of contaminants your chain is exposed to when you ride... etc. My method is: Only if very grimy, I will use a solvent (WD40 or similar) to help break ...


9

I'd get a new chain and use a chain tool next time. The links have rivets in them which are hard to push out without a chain tool (and other tools can weaken the chain leading to failure, especially with a cockamamie way like you're trying). Given that a cheap chain tool is 10-15 dollars it's a worthy investment relative to the cost of a replacement chain. ...


0

Take broken link out (actually, two links, otherwise it won't fit back) and rivet the chain back. It is preferred to use repair pin when assembling the chain back (they're cheap, and MUCH easier to fit in). But if you don't have one, make sure when you taking out the pin not to push it all the way out of the chain, so it stays in the link - later it will be ...


1

If one of the side plates of the chain is falling off, you need a new chain. Chains are relatively cheap, and get one with a master link so you don't even need a special tool. It may be possible to push it back on, but it'll fall off again real quick, probably taking the other side with it. This is false economy. You should also start a maintenance log ...


1

Since the rings, cogs and chain are new, and decent components we can safely eliminate the possibility that there is a problem with the chain grabbing the rings or cogs. Here is what I suspect might be happening: it's your derailleur: due to wear, damage or perhaps weakened springs. Here is how: as you pedal, the chain temporarily catches in the derailleur ...


0

On the assumption that everything was fitted properly, my first guess would be chain is too long, my second would be that derailleur adjustment is required, but this guess doesn't specifically fit your description of "hard" pedalling. But these are only guesses, remember, maybe your LBS can help you some more.


0

KMC Z33 from Google search. Check manufacture specs http://www.jensonusa.com/Redline-Monocog-Bike-2014 $11 https://www.amazon.com/KMC-Chain-Speed-Nickel-Plated/dp/B000AYFRUE Your chain is 1/2" x 3/32


1

I think the ideal chain replacement would be the Sram PC-1. I use this on my single speed mountain bike and stand up and crank on it with no issues what so ever. The installation is very straight forward and the master link is very easy to use. I would definitely not recommend an old multi-speed chain for this application mainly because the PC-1 is so ...


0

My friend recently gashed the back of her calf completely open on the exposed sprockets, so to those who claim it won't hurt your skin...it did. It's now got splattered flesh all strewn about it. She's got 14 outer stitches and 4 inner. The gash went down to her muscle. DEFINITELY buying chain guards asap.


4

My suspicions is that the change relates to wearing through one material type into another, but it would be nice to get confirmation from people who know more. Another hypothesis is that as the pin-to-link mating surfaces wear, they create an increasing gap for the entry of dirt. Once dirt gets between the parts, wear accelerates due to a "wet sanding" ...


2

I've answered http://bicycles.stackexchange.com/a/40942/19705 and it got me thinking about this two-phase wear. Perhaps (and this is only a supposition) at new the chain meshes nicely with the teeth of the cassette and chainring. So your 48 tooth chainring has ~24 teeth in contact with the chain, and the load is shared between multiple teeth. Same at the ...


-2

The major differences are the HX series is machined a little differently, which aids in preventing chain stretch from happening as quickly and increases over all tensile strength. The pins are mushroomed which also adds durability and helps with lateral flex. The increased cost is due to increased machining/production process. Other than those two things ...


-1

Motor oil is as good as any other fantasy chain lubes. What should be kept in mind is the motor oil is fresh and not leftover extract while servicing a vehicle. If the instructions are to re-lube (after cleaning) after every few rides, then there will not be a problem with motor oil even. If one wants to keep the lubrication longer, the thicker the ...


5

With reference to the new/used bits of your question, note that using worn consumables (chain, cassette etc.) on a bike is never a good idea, largely because you're in the dark as regards how much life is left in them. So my best guess is that the chain or maybe both chain and the cassette needs replacing for new parts. Assuming that these parts are ...



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