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There's nothing wrong with crosschaining with the modern drivetrains, despite what you might read in the comments. In fact, many modern drivetrains are specifically designed to help you to crosschain (like "trim" feature on some front shifters). The ability to use all cassette cogs without having to switch chainrings is too valuable to be given up because of ...


1

I went through a similar exercise this summer. Maybe my experience can be helpful. I have 15 year old Mountain bike with XTR components all around. My 6 year old chain starting to bind in a couple of links so I decided to change it out. I did not buy a Shimano chain but used a KMC 8 speed chain from LBS. I made the mistake of throwing out the old chain. ...


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That chain you have will be fine. Chains generally last 1000 or so miles, sometimes more. You should save the new chain to replace this chain currently on your bike when it gets worn out. Not replacing a worn out chain can cost you $$ because you will likely need to replace the cassette and possibly the chainrings


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Maybe FD is broken. Check if it does shakes. Maybe whole crank is bent - not separate teeth. Check whether the crank is closer to frame at one point.


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If it works great, leave it alone. Measure the chain every few hundred miles and install the new one as soon as the one you have on now is worn beyond spec. And, when you have a few minutes to spare, read this: http://sheldonbrown.com/chains.htm


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One other possibility is a problem on the chain itself. - Pedal backwards and watch closely to see if any any links are twisted. - Make sure that every link pivots the way that it should. These could have happened when you had problems in the rear.


3

To fix it, you don't have to break the chain. Simply unscrew one or both of the derailer pulleys slightly until you have enough space to get the chain through.


2

In my experience it is usually the derailleur hanger that gets bent. After all derailleur hangers are built to be the weakest point so that in case something hits the derailleur neither the frame nor the derailleur is damaged. The hanger is just a 15$ part. There is a derailleur hanger alignment gauge, which bike shops use to check whether the hanger is ...


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I'd say that yes, that indicates a bent derailleur. A bent hangar would cause faulty shifting, but wouldn't cause wear like that. That wear implies that the chain line off, and the chain is rubbing the derailleur cage. There's a chance you can just replace the cage/pulleys and fix the problem, but I'm not sure. If you remount the derailleur is there ...


3

Single speed last longer and cost less. More metal and less (no) flex. SS comes in 1/8 and 3/32. I would contend a SS 3/32 of the same basic construction is stronger than a 3/32 7 speed because it does not need to be built to flex and it is not flexed. I am not finding any pictures of 3/32 SS chains and the chain on my SS bike is 1/8. So I guess it is ...


5

Why would you need chains and cassettes that cost in excess of 300 dollars? Several reasons: You're a professionally sponsored racer, money is no object and you want to cut every gram of weight possible. You have way too much money (generally, people who buy top end equipment fall into this group). It looks cool among a certain crowd. In picking your ...


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I have had this happen due to a worn rear derailleur spring. the rear derailleur isn't able to take up the slack fast enough. also check your chain line, bent rear derailleur hanger, front derailleur cage alignment. see if you can fit a chain catcher on your bike.


5

Cogs and chains "wear together" (regardless of whether they are front rings or rear sprockets). The old chain does not slip on the ring, because the old chain's rollers are worn down. They have an overall smaller diameter than the rollers of a new chain, and also a different shape: new rollers are cylinders, but worn ones look like small pulleys, they have ...


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Yes a new chain can skip in either an old chain ring or old cassette. The length between chain lengths needs to match. So the old chain matched up to the old ring. The new chain does not match up with the old chain ring. I suspect the middle chain ring looks worn. If so for sure time to replace it. What do I need to know to buy new chainrings for ...


6

I expect that after 10,000 km your chainring also needs to be replaced (frankly, I find it astonishing that you made it that far without replacing anything else. That's amazing.). Am I correct in guessing that you spend most of your time in your middle chainring? If so, it will be significantly more worn than your large or small rings, which would explain ...


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The work they did doesn't require the chain to be removed (as others have mentioned). It could be a defect but once again, the prices of chain are way to cheap to worry about it. Given the volume of chain SRAM puts out, one in a million chance. The rest of the chain is fine however so remove the broken link and keep on riding. When adding links, chain ...


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Chances are they misaligned the gears a little. I've snapped a few new chains and the most common circumstance is after I've messed with my gear indexing (I'd say "sorting out" but breaking a chain indicates it didn't work). There IS a chance that it's just a bad chain but it's also possible you did something wrong too. I'd call the bike shop and tell them ...


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In an emergency, you could always push out the pin of the next link (not fully, obiously) and reattach it where you removed the first pin. You'd lose a link (and possibly a gear) but you'd be able to ride home.


2

I always carry the cutoff from a new chain (or a few links of it) in my kit. Take the chain apart at the next link down from where you lost the pin (being more careful this time) and then take two half-links from the cutoff and install them. And, while you have that cutoff piece handy, do a trial to see how many turns of the crank it it is to take the pin ...


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What type of chain - Shimano have chain connector pins for exactly this task for many of their chains. Note the pin must exactly match the chain. If you have a length of the same chain (I always keep the left overs when I put ion a new chain) break the chain again and remake the chain with the leftovers. I have (in desperation - bike shops 100km away, no ...


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Had just this problem to the extent where when the chain was over the large cogs, front and rear, the derailleur was excessively stretched. The changes operated OK, but noticed that the changes weren't smooth when on the larger front cog. Changes on the rear derailleur operated with a bit of clicking and hesitation not dissimilar to an indexing problem. I ...


8

If you think about it, the purpose of oiling is to lubricate where you have metal moving against metal. So in the diagram below: you need to oil the pin/roller area. There's no point oiling the face plates (which I think is what you're saying?). When you oil, know how many links are in the chain (or mark your start link), and go around the whole chain ...


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To quote Sheldon Brown: "If the chain is too short, it will be at risk for jamming and possibly ruining the rear derailer if you accidentally shift into the large-large combination. Never run with a chain that is too short, except in an emergency." (I will say that depending on if your chain is short enough, it can happen in combos other than large-large.) ...



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