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1

How long a single chain or cassette will last depends heavily on the riding conditions. For example, do you weigh 50kg or 150kg? Do you ride a road bike in fair weather, or a touring bike on salted snowy roads? If you're of average weight and riding in decent weather, you may find a single chain can last several thousand miles before it should be ...


3

Found an English Language site that explains it. From http://www.cycle-heaven.co.uk/bikes/brands/gazelle/gazelle-chamonix-c7-women-s-2015/ All Chamonixs feature Gazelle's innovative transmission design with a chain tensioner inside the chain case. This keeps the chain always at the correct tension, needing less maintenance and giving a quieter ...


6

There are several issues that contribute to continuous rolls being less popular that pre packaged chains. Selection Economics: Even if a shop purchased 3 boxes of continuous chain (8, 9 and 10 speed), they still are only carrying one type of chain. Looking at how many component levels are available from any manufacturer, you can see how that would be a ...


10

They do. Connex (Wipperman) sells bulk chain, as shown by this link, and these people also buy it by the spool. This is likely what bike manufacturers do, and I've seen it in a bike shop or two. I'm sure you can also get it at some place like McMaster-Carr or Grainger if you ask for ANSI #40 roller chain with the appropriate width (possibly by special ...


5

It appears your rear derailleur pulley cage spring is not doing its job. In your picture, it should be pivoted back towards the right side of the picture, maintaining chain tension. You'll have to remove and clean out your pulley cage, clean up and lubricate the spring and reassemble it. If that doesn't solve your problem, you'll have to replace the ...


1

Is it the same link every time? There could be a tight/sticky link in the chain from when it was installed. I'm not sure why that would have come up after removing/replacing the wheel, but it's worth checking. Mark or otherwise make note the problem link Take the wheel off or push it in the dropout to put slack in the chain See if that link is difficult ...


1

Given that it is an old bicycle, it is likely that the chain or the cassette (or even chain ring) are worn down to the point that it's causing your symptoms. However, it's also possible that the derailleurs are mal-configured and your gears need to be indexed correctly. It may be worth checking this out too as it's a relatively quick fix. As pointed out by ...


6

Tricky one. You will go through several chains before going through a cassette. A worn chain can be measured quite easily with a gauge. Measuring wear on a cassette is more difficult. It is usually the middle set of sprockets which wear first - due to their more frequent use. If examined carefully - you may notice the teeth on them thinning.


0

Parts need a break in time to stretch, flex, and do what they do before they kind of settle in. When I worked at a bikeshop, we told our customers to come in after a month or 2 so that we could go through and get everything tuned up to where it should be after the break in period. Not only is your situation normal, most bike shops WANT you to bring it back ...


1

Are you pretty good mechanically? You could try this: Repairing stripped pedal thread


9

Yes, you need to replace the crank arm, if tightening the bolt does not make it 100% solid again. No doubt the crank arm had been loose for days, and had you tightened it earlier you might have "saved" it. And there's some danger that you have damaged the crank axle as well, meaning the bottom bracket cartridge will need changing out as well. I have ...


4

You can do that (*) - you just need to make sure you don't push the pin out all the way before reinstalling it (else it becomes quite hard to put the pin back in). However, a quick link is easier to install and remove (**) the chain (also, carrying a few of them around make for easy emergency repairs), since you only have to use the chain tool to shorten the ...


2

To adjust chainline, you can: At the back use spacers between the hub and cog At the front use a longer/shorter bb spindle (as Kibbee says) use spacers on the bb cups (as Mark W says) use chainring washers (and likely different bolts) to adjust the position of the chainring on the crank I'm struggling to think of any more options. The only other ...



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