Tag Info

New answers tagged

-3

As long as it can till it falls to pieces, no mechanical part will ever fail as an identical one at the same time ever. Prolong it? Don't use it!


1

Easiest way to put the pin back? Pull the link apart just enough to set the pin from the inside. Make sure one side is straight and tap it in with a hammer. Flip it over and tap the other side in. Can do it in about 30 seconds and no hootin' and hollerin'


0

Carel misses the point that there is no front derailleur so it's definitely not a limit screw issue on the front derailleur! It's also highly unlikely the chainring is worn from just 3,000km. It's also unlikely to be the chain given that you changed it not that long ago. Finally, limit screws very rarely come out of adjustment on their own. I think people ...


1

As an old chain wears, the rollers get smaller and the chain settles deeper into the teeth of the gears. This results in more wear on the gears and, over time, the teeth will get pointier. Because the chain rollers are thicker on a new chain, it will sit higher on the teeth of the gears and when the teeth are worn enough the chain will slip. Changing the ...


0

Is it skipping across all gears or just a few? If it's across all gears - and especially in the smallest (hardest to push) cogs - chances are the derailleur needs adjustment which is handled by the barrel adjuster (the knob on the back of the derailleur where the cable housing enters the derailleur). Do this in small increments - 1/4 turn counter ...


0

How do the cogs’ teeth look? Are some cogs’ really pointy? Is it the first new chain? Usually a cassette should last for several chains if you replace the chains in time and wear down the cogs evenly (i.e. don’t drive on the same cog all the time, especially the smaller ones which wear faster).


-1

As Carel says - there are limit screws to prevent the chain from going out of range. It is important to set those limits correctly or the chain will fall off. Did the LBS not check the limit settings? Even with a new chain and new correctly set derailleur, the chain can and will jump off the sprocket if the limit screws are not set properly. In the ...


0

Even though I am commenting long after the this question is already answered, I think it is worthwhile to point out some safety information. The pins of modern 9 speed and up chains are mushroomed at the ends to prevent prying the chain apart with lateral force when changing gears. Because of this, not only should pins no longer be re-used, but the ...


1

Rather than eyeballing, ballparking, or relying on tables, I have found that a ruler is the simplest and most accurate tool for this job. Put the ruler with the zero mark in the middle of the seat tube, and measure the distance to the teeth on the chainring. Then measure the inside diameter of the frame at the rear dropouts where the rear axle goes. ...


0

Based on my experience, determining the chainline based on specifications of the components (BB and Crankset) and a simple math calculation is the best approach. This is because I was having a hard time to ballpark the chainline. I then found out that the manufacturer of the crankset I use provides a specification document which describes the recommended ...


0

You won't like the price tag on this solution, but to get my single speed bike with a perfect chainline, I used the Surly Single-Speed Kit which has 6 spacers of different widths that let you get things exactly right. The kits run about $40, but you also need a rear hub with the Shimano style cassette mount, such as for a 5-cog cassette on a 10-speed bike.


1

Your chain or, less likely, your chainring (what you call front cog), could be worn. That would be a little early and could indicate less than optimal maintenance (keeping things clean and lubricated), but wear depends highly on circumstances (rain, mud, velocity). It's simple to measure chain wear: they lengthen in use. Just measure the length of 10 ...


2

My reasoning is that since I will only ever use the 29 tooth on the cassette with the 34 tooth chainring, that chain length should not be an issue. I wouldn’t count on that. It just needs one sleepy, careless moment where you shift and shift and shift while being on the big chainring. I’ve tried too-short chains on a bike stand with manual pedaling and ...


1

The point is to get the chain untangled. Once you do that, you can remount the derailleur, feed the chain through it and you are home. Tangles are hard. Even a photo won't help. The good news is that there isn't too much to play with, so just playing should get you there.


3

I would guess, without seeing a photo (if my explain explanation below doesn't work, perhaps you could post one), that what has happened is that the chain has doubled back on itself. It will look like it is tangled, but in fact it is not. Let me try to explain how to sort it out… Pick a spot on the chain to start, I'd suggest where it comes off of the ...


1

The only issue would be if your current chain length assumed you would not use the 27 with the 50, while now you presumably might do so now. In that case you might be one short. I would change the cassette, then put the bike on a stand, and try it. I find it hard to avoid occasional cross-chaining, but you may not. If adding a link solves the problem, ...


2

I agree with @ Nik that it should not be an issue. You can verify it by shifting the chain to the big ring in the front and the large cog in the rear. With your hands fold the chain over itself to simulate it being two links shorter. Observe the rear derailleur. You should see two bends in the chains as it passes around the jockey wheels. If the chain ...


4

There are two measurements, given as pitch x width. The pitch is the distance between rollers and width is the width that the sprockets have to fit through. The pitch is generally 1/2" on modern chains, but some old bicycles (esp. old track bicycles) use 1" pitch chains (skip link or block chains). The width changes depending on number of speeds (so you'll ...


4

From Sheldon Brown The normal technique is to measure a one-foot length, placing an inch mark of the ruler at the side of one link pin, then looking at the corresponding link pin 12 complete links away. On a new, unworn chain, this link pin will also line up exactly with an inch mark. From what I can see in the second photo, the edge of the ruler ...


3

For fixed, single speed and hub gears belt drives are great, if slightly more expensive initially. They don't work with derailleurs. The key difference is that as chains wear they also wear the sprockets and chainrings and therefore all need replacing if you leave it too long or don't lubricate often enough. Belt drives are used in many applications which ...


1

I think your derailleur needs adjustment. Watch this video and if you think you can follow those steps, try it. Otherwise bring your bike to a bike shop and let them do it.


1

All 8- and 9-speed Shimano mountain derailleurs are compatible. Just pick one that you like. The one thing to worry is long cage versus extra long cage, and unless you know you have an extra wide range of gears, long cage is fine. The chain is also fine. If you are changing the chain because is worn out or "stretched", you should probably replace the rear ...


2

With 8 extra links you can make your own chain whip with a nice piece of wood next time you need to swap your cassette. I actually did this recently. Worker reasonably well.



Top 50 recent answers are included