New answers tagged

0

You might want to make sure your chain still bends at the links where you pressed the pin back in. Smashing it together too hard is easy and that will "freeze the chain straight at that point. This of course will cause a skip. I'm not an expert, but the freewheel looks pretty solid to me. Still has the chamfers ground out on the trailing edge without any ...


6

The load is spread across more teeth on the chainrings than on the cassette, so they tend to last quite a bit longer. If they said your chainrings are fine, then they are probably no problem. derailleurs don't really have many parts that can wear out. There isn't much load being placed on the jockey wheels, so they can last quite a long time. The spring ...


1

Any tool that can be used on an 11-speed chain should work to 'break-the-link', i.e. push the pin (rivet) out. I have never updated my Park CT-3 tool in years and have used it on a variety of chain variations, from 8 speed up to 11. You should look for a KMC replacement master link, as most manufacturers do not recommend using other manufacturer's master ...


2

Assumptions: the bike is a geared bike with a rear shifting mechanism that works okay. You're looking to replace the chainring(s) on the front because they're rusted. If you keep the same number of teeth, then everything else will continue. However if the chainring is worn, there's a good chance you'll need a new chain and new rear cassette as well. ...


0

You should get to the bike shop and they get you a chain the size you need. If you don't want to go with you bike, take your older chain. For sure it is under 30$. I paid less than 20 for a SRAM chain not long ago.


0

It happens when you put pressure on the chain, not when switching gears, right? If it's a more recent issue, usually this happens due to wear & tear on Chain/Cogs/Chain ring. (Chain rings wear off and become less able to grip the chain. I had to replace my chain ring a few months ago when that happened. Replacing chain rings doesn't mean replacing the ...


0

I will describe my bike 'problem' so you can see whether it fits with your problem. I know what the reasons are and how to solve them, so it is not an 'I also have this problem' answer. I have the problem of a slipping chain and on my bike it is clearly a tension wheel that moves out of its place, so in fact the chain is not tensioned enough. The slippage ...


0

As Mike answered, mostly the chain slips when the cogs are worn, thou, as he pointed, it's common to start with some gears, not all of them. Only one time I saw a cassette worn out so it was slipping on all the cogs. Second thing to check is the chain. When the chain is worn (or not proper length) it can slip also. But if it happened after only after a ...


4

You likely have a problem with worn drivetrain components. You only really notice the jumping under load is my experience. It's either a worn chain or a worn cassette in most cases. If you replace the cassette, replace the chain too. Surprisingly enough, a worn chain and a worn cassette may work well together till one of the two parts are replaced.


1

Similar thing happened to me before but not in that amount that chain would slip completely. I was also using bike stand and after adjusting gears (while bike was on bike stand), my chain was slipping a little on every cog during ride. I think, there is a slight possibility if you use this kind of bike stand, that when you place your bike on the stand, ...


2

If the problem was worse in some gears, I'd say you have worn-out cogs. But you say that it doesn't depend on the gear... So I'm going to guess that your freewheel mechanism is failing, and the pawls are slipping when they're under heavy load.


1

When all drivetrain parts serviced and in good repair, this problem doesn't happen. Couple of things you can check: Front and Rear derailleur adjusted properly. Check the chain stretch. How worn out is the cassette? I don't presume to tell people what to pay for; but bringing your bike into a good local bike shop for a tune is the fastest way to get this ...


0

Modern chains all have 1/2" pitch (distance between rollers), but there are several different widths. 1/8" is common for single speed and internal gear hubs, while 3/32" (and narrower in the case of are common for derailleur-based bicycles) though many single speed/internal gear hubs use a 3/32" chain (this depends on which cog+chainring combo is used). ...


0

Also check condition and if there is significant play in you bottom bracket. When standing, you put maximum pressure on the bottom bracket and maybe it is tilting, and moving position of chain. If neither chain or BB replacement help, it might be that you are just u big person on gentle frame, and frame flexes under the load you are putting it under.


2

That chain is sitting quite well on the front ring, almost perfectly, as far as can be discerned in the photo. In particularly, it doesn't appear to be elongated at all, which is usually the telltale sign of chain wear. When a chain is elongated, you can easily tell on the front ring, because it has so many teeth that the cumulative error of the elongated ...


1

You have (at least) two problems. As you can see from the wear marks on the tensioner fixing bolt (the lower one), something is forcing the tensioner to release the chain. That suggests to me that you're catching the chain on something, because there's quite a bit of force required to scrub off the anodising and get back to bare metal on the tensioner. I ...


1

Any cranks should do, as long as you can attach two chain rings to the rear spider. My guess is that chainline is unlikely to be an issue if it differs by up to 30mm, as it's a longer run than on, say, a dérailleur system which seems to cope fine with offsets of at least 30mm. What you will need to watch is that the two chains are narrow enough that they ...


3

You can use whatever cranksets you like and have available. But tandems need either an eccentric bottom bracket on the front, OR a chain tensioner in order to set the tension on the link/timimg chain. 1.1. If you are only pootling around on the flat then perhaps the loss of the front chainring is acceptable. But any hills or a good stiff headwind and ...


1

My guess would be a lack of chain tension. Is there too much chain length on that single-speed conversion? You would want to run it - with the minimum amount of chain - and then use the chain tensioner to remove any remaining slack.


2

It's definitely possible to do #1, although you need to match the bolt pattern and bolt circle diameter (BCD). That's a common change for many cyclists. If you're running both chains on the right hand side standard cranksets are all you need (this is typically why people do that) Chainline is important, and typically you would put both idler chainrings on ...


1

Logically, the longer chain cannot cause a problem. This is because your 11-28 cassette already includes an 11-23 cassette inside it. The longer chain is working just fine with the 11-23 which are there now. It will work exactly the same if 11-23 is the entire range! If you have no droop with 11-28, there will not be droop with 11-23 with the same chain ...


4

You've got a 'stretched' chain that needs to be replaced. If the chain has been in this condition for some time, and I suspect it has, I always recommend replacing the cassette at the same time. The reason being that a worn chain wears down the cassette and a new, unworn chain, will fit the old worn cassette poorly and the skipping will continue. I had to ...


1

This sounds like a stiff or separated link in your chain. There are other options, but this would be easy to eliminate, and a likely cause. Get off the bike, and very slowly pedal backwards while looking at the chain as it passes through the rear derailleur. A stiff or broken link should jump as it goes through the derailleur. If the chain starts to ...



Top 50 recent answers are included