Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

17

The idea used to be that a triple was just a double with an extra small, 'granny' ring (i.e. only grandmothers would need to use that one) so there was definitely some snobbery in a triple; that it was designed for those who needed a little more help. So on the club training run, you might be teased for it. (Google for 'triple granny ring' for various forum ...


15

If you are looking at the Biopace/Rotor/O-Symmetric relationship as similar due purely to aesthetics, or their similarity due to their lack of similarity to round chainrings then, yes, they are similar products. But, that said, from the RotoR website "The Q-Rings are elliptical; the Biopace and O.SYMETRIC chainrings are asymmetrical.". And Sheldon Brown ...


12

As the others have stated, there's nothing wrong with any various drive train types (triple, double, 1x, single, etc). Compact drivetrains and triples are becoming more common because they provide an easier set of options for casual riding. A traditional double for a road bike may be more than most people want for casual riding. For example, if you take a ...


11

Yeah. A modern double chainring is ramped and pinned, in order to be more easily shifted from one ring to the next. Simply put, the chainring "wants" to pass off the chain to the next cog. Without a derailleur to keep it in place, the lateral pull of the chain shifting across the rear, combined with some road jostling, can make the chain fall off the front. ...


10

Obviously, the simpler the better, and a triple is a little, er, "crankier" to maintain and use than a double. But on most bikes it will mean that you have both a slightly larger large gear and a significantly smaller small gear, in addition to having closer "jumps" between gears. Exactly how this all will work out depends on the manufacturer's choice of ...


10

Those notches are used when shifting gears, as you move the derailleur, the chain moves and catches on a notch and switches from one chainring to another adjusting the gearing. You do not need a replacement bicycle, this is a nice bike and with proper maintenance (keeping the drive train clean and lubed) should last a long time.


9

Well, in 2010 there's the S1, S2 and S3. S1 is lower-end and has 50/34. In 2011, they dropped the S1 and there's only the S2 and S3. (based on what's up on their website right now) The lowest end of the line is probably considered something like "entry level" or at least "not for racers", so it gets the "slower" chainring setup. They've kept the ...


9

You'll probably need to replace the cassette as well. Generally once the chain has worn ("stretched") a little, it starts to wear down all the gears (front and back) that it touches. If there's enough wear that the front chainrings need to be replaced, it's almost certain that the gears on the cassette that you use most are also worn enough to need ...


8

Presumably with 12K+ km, and never having bought new chain rings, you have a very high cadence. You should get a new chain every time you change your cassette, btw. If you are doing the work yourself, I don't see any reason to change the chain ring immediately. Try the new cassette and chain and see how it works. If it isn't broke, don't fix it. If it ...


8

Drivetrain components tend to wear in this order: Chain Rear cassette/sprockets Front chainrings (and the teeth on your derailleur's jockey wheels may last, but the bearings may not) The chain is usually the culprit for wearing out the other two. As it wears, the distance between links effectively increases, and the mismatch between the links and teeth ...


8

50/34 makes more and more sense for most people. Especially as many cassettes come as 11-25 rather than 12-25. A 50x11 is the same ratio as 53x12. The 50/34 combination therefore offers great flexibility in gear ratio even for top level racers. I know of one rider whom finished regularly in the top 50 at the Etape du Tour and competes at Premier Calendar ...


8

Possible causes: There is "play" in the bottom bracket bearings, this could also explain the clicks. Usually this is quite noticeable, and you can check it by grabbing the crank-arm and trying to move it sideways. Usually this is not the cause for variable chain tension on singles; The chainring is "eccentric", either because of haveing been tightened ...


8

The crankset you have is actually held together with rivets and not bolts. Some manufacturers of some low-end cranksets make the rivets with a hex head on one side. The easiest way to remove it is with a hex key and a drill. Select a drill bit that is slightly larger than the core of the rivet. Being sure to hold it steady with a hex key, drill enough ...


7

In theory they are more efficient. Throughout the pedal stroke your leg doesn't give an equal amount of force - ideally you want to spend most of the time pushing down with the big thigh muscles and a minimum time in the horizontal movements at the top and bottom of the stroke. Elliptical front cogs give you a more up-down leg motion, so more time with ...


7

This is a common setup for many freeride bikes, as it allows uphill peddling and a bash guard. However only certain models of chain guide support this, and the one your son has doesn't officially (though it wouldn't hurt to try if you have crankset to test, might affect derailleur...). The DRS is eThirteen's 'official' dually chain guide.


7

This is actually a matter of the force multiplication that each chainring provides, and the size/mass of each chainring. Force difference Let's propose, only for a moment that you had a chainring as big that the radius of it is almost the same as the crank length. If the rider stood to pedal while using that chainring (and using simple platform pedals). ...


7

Yes, this should be possible. Though there are several things you need to check to ensure it is compatible: Number of bolts, and bolt circle diameter (BCD). Count the number of bolts, and measure the distance between the centre of two bolts. Then check Sheldon Brown's Bolt Circle Diameter Crib Sheet to see what the BCD is. Common sizes are 110 (mountain ...


6

I think Shimano integrated shifters ("brifters") for the front derailleur on a triple normally have 5 indexed positions: 1-3-5 are the main positions that match the chainrings and 2-4 are intermediate spots to avoid chain rub for some chainring+sprocket combinations. If you give the front shift lever a short pull it will click once and the front derailleur ...


6

When Campagnolo introduced their 11 speed high end groupsets they re-engineered the chainset and introduced 'Micro Precision Shifting' and that new bottom bracket design amongst other features. Whilst they were at it they put the new (and thinner) chainrings on the 9/10 speed groupsets, including yours. Not that yours is compatible with 11 speed - you would ...


6

The positive of a triple crank is a greater range of gears. A triple crank will give you a lower low gear which may be useful for climbing steep hills. The negative of a triple crank is weight. You have an extra large gear which will likely weigh around 8 or 10 ounces. Since those ounces are on a part of the bike that rotates, they matter. So if you ...


6

You should always install a new chain (or have one that's pretty new already) when you install a new cassette. But you can go through 5 or so chains on a single cassette.


6

You may need to change your cassette with your chain due to damage, but only if your bike has missed out on some previous maintenance. If you ride one chain beyond the point of wear, it will damage both cassette and chain rings to different degrees. Your chain is a consumable component on your bike. For most people, 1200-1500 kilometers on a chain is a ...


6

7 speed systems use slightly wider chains, and the teeth on the chainring are slightly wider too. You might run into an issue with a ten speed chain not fitting over the teeth, or at least not fitting well.


6

As far as My experience gets on mountain biking, cheap steel is more resistant than cheap aluminum, with expensive parts the story changes a lot because many different alloys are used by different manufacturers or even the same manufacturer changes the formula among models. The advantage of steel anyway is that it can be safely unbent as long as the ...


6

You probably can't fit a bigger front chainring on that bike due to the front derailleur and chain issues. They do make 11 toothed 7 speed cassettes which you can install (but I doubt you'll gain anything from it due to the second point I want to make on cadence), which will give you a bit higher gearing but the spacing between the cogs (i.e. the number of ...


6

All chains are the same link length, but there are different widths. Some single speed components require a 1/8 inch chain, while the chain that come with your bike is probably 3/32. You will have to get a new chain or exchange the chaining for one that fits your chain.


5

I've heard different rules of thumb (rule of thumbs?) about how much use you can get, and remember none of them. What I do know is that not lubeing a chain often enough--actually, cleaning and lubeing--will cause it to wear such that it 'stretches'. Not stretch like taffy, but gain overall length due to the pins and bushings in the links wearing down, ...


5

This is probably down to the gear cables. If the cables are new they may have stretched a little and you'll need to take the slack out by adjusting the tension, you usually do this with a barrel adjuster either at the shifter or inline in the shifter cable. If the cables have been on the bike for some time then the problem is probably sticky cables, ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible