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0

That crank is unusual and therefore it is hard to give you advice. It shouldn't be the bearings because they don't usually make a big noise, but rather make the crank harder to move around (you can perfectly feel bad bearings if you try moving it with your hand and feel resistance/side-to-side movement). Can you install the crank without the clutch ...


2

According to the Big Blue Book of Bicycle Repair, Shimano steel chainring bolts 70-95 inlbs. Aluminum 44-88 inlbs. A Park Tool CNW-2 chainring tool or similar is used to hold the slotted nut and an allen wrench turns the bolt. Depending on the size of the chainrings you may be able to use a slotted screwdriver to hold the nuts.


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I ran into this exact problem. In my case, it was buying 9-speed chain for an 8-speed drivetrain— I didn't realize backward compatibility was an issue.


3

Use the Clutch! This is what I always tell people when I'm teaching them how to shift gears properly. Chain-rings and Cogs are machined with *pickup points" that assist transferring the chain from one ring to the other, they only work while you're turning the cranks. So I tell people to let all the power off of their pedals, but keep the cranks turning and ...


1

It sounds like the front derailleur needs adjustment. If you recently bought the bike from a shop then take it back for adjustment. If that's the problem then it will take only a few minutes. If it's worse, such a bent chain ring it will likely cost $$. If you want to do it yourself, check out the front derailleur questions. To change gears using ...


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As Sander already noted not turning the gears will not allow shifting at all. Thus turning the pedals without really stressing them is key. When shifting to a higher gear with such a system it might be necessary to firmly press the shifting lever when shifting the front gear up, or even shift twice if misconfigurated. That stopping the pedaling helps for ...


4

Completely stopping pedaling will not let you shift gears at all. You do have to reduce the tension in the top of the chain to shift front, so pedal, but with small force. The derailleur cannot push the chain sideways if it is under too much tension and thus pulled tight against the chainrings. It is normal to reduce pedaling force when shifting.


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Check and see if your cranks can move side-to-side. You might need to loosen the left crankark, push it on all the way and re-tighten.


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Back in the seventies and eighties it wasn't uncommon to remove the inner chainring from bikes used on flat time trials to save weight. Often the chain length was set intentionally on the long side to reduce friction, which had the undesirable side effect of making it easier to rop the chain. At the same time it was generally considered to be a good idea ...


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I have a built myself a single chainring bike and I'm just having this problem. Bike ran fine for the first month now the chain jumps off the chainring when on the smaller sprockets. I had a dodgy link in the chain which was giving too much flex so I replaced that and it seems to run better so chain your chain but the problem is still there. In response to ...



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