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Check out the IRD Defiant wide range double crankset http://store.somafab.com/irdwicorodoc.html) It has a 94bcd which allows it to run 46x30 rings. Combine that with a 12-27 cassette or freewheel and you'll have plenty of range. Going to a triple presents a few problems: They don't shift as well as a double. You have a short cage rear derailleur so max ...


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Here you have a compatibility chart for Race Face cranksets. Chain rings are not as standardized as cassettes and hubs for example, but you usually have a fair choice of inter-compatible components across different brands.


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I had this problem with a pair of Race Face Cadence cranks (road version). I think Race Face does this to force you into buying their chain rings. I am sure there is some "engineering" argument why their rings are more compatible with their cranks, but frankly their rings are only so-so (my opinion). So far every brand I have tried has this conflict as ...


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There are two measurements, given as pitch x width. The pitch is the distance between rollers and width is the width that the sprockets have to fit through. The pitch is generally 1/2" on modern chains, but some old bicycles (esp. old track bicycles) use 1" pitch chains (skip link or block chains). The width changes depending on number of speeds (so you'll ...


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It sounds like you already know the range of high and low gears that work for you on your normal rides – an 11-24 cassette with a 38 tooth chainring, which covers a range of 93.1 to 42.7 "gear inches." The closest standard 8-speed cassettes are an 11-23 or a 12-23 (Sheldon Brown has a list of available cassettes). Both are pretty close to the range you're ...


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If you aren't using many of the gears, then you should definitely go for something with a smaller range. The triple crank will give you plenty of range even without a wide range cassette. They sell 12-25 and 12-23 cassettes which may be closer to what you are looking for. I have an 8 speed cassette with a 52-42-30 crankset and I opted for the 12-23 cassette. ...


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If I were in your situation, I would definitely get a compact (50/34) crank. Gaining lower gears for climbing makes some uphills possible and other uphills easier. All you have to give up is maybe some top speed on downhills. You're still able to ride those downhills, only you'll be going 55kph instead of 60kph. Or increase your cadence. In general I come ...


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Using a standard crank with a 700/23 wheel development: 53x11 is 10.1 meters, at 90 rpm is 54.55 kph 53x12 is 9.3 meters, at 90 rpm is 50.05 kph In comparison, a compact crank with the same wheel: 50x11 is 9.5 meters, at 90 rpm is 51.50kph 50x12 is 8.7 meters, at 90 rpm is 47.15 kph until you become a pro cyclist and can hold 40+kph average speeds, you ...



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