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the Giant site it says that this is sold with a KMC Z51 1/2" * 3/32" chain. So it should have a 3/32" chain. I've since gone to two different shops who have both sold what appears to be the same sized chain (1/2" * 1/8") 1/8" = 4/32". That's more than 3/32". which isn't fitting, as it's too wide. Funny that. 1/8" chain isn't stronger unless ...


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Given the bike operates like a single speed and all the gearing is in the hub, you should be fine removing the chainguard. Be warned though if you cycle in trousers this increases the chance of losing your trouser leg to the bite of chain meeting chainring. You're also more likely to increase the chance of the dreaded chain grease tattoo on legs or trousers. ...


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A bigger gear is useful only if you can actually use it. With the 42t & the smallest cog, pedaling at 90rpm, speed will be, approximately, between 24 & 26.5mph depending on the size of the cog. Can you spin the bigger gear, the 48t? You need to know the specs for the front derailleur. The maximum chain-ring size the FD can handle will need to be at ...


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The TX-50 is a tourney level part (bottom of the barrel). If the bike is spec'd with a Tourney derailleur, it is most likely spec'd with a crankset which does not have replaceable chainrings, and you'd need to put on a new crank. As for chainring size, I'm not sure a TX-50 can take a 48t chainring (likely not - you'd have to look at the data sheet, which I ...


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You will probably not be able to just exchange the big ring, as that will probably require a new front derailleur. There are quite some people around, complaining for too small front chainrings, when in reality the problem is their low cadence (<70). However, a 42t big chainring could indeed be a problem for road riding. I am familiar only with Schwalbe ...


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As long as your front derailleur can be adjusted vertically to accommodate the 52tooth chainring, the drivetrain should run fine. The jumps between gears is not large so shifting would likely not be a problem but this will not be the quietest of drivetrains.


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For most people, they're just a bit pricier. The weight difference is insignificant for almost everyone (excluding possibly serious racers). As for durability, I'd expect its more of a function of maintenance rather than trim level. But I'd actually guess the "lower end" Tiagra part is probably a bit more durable since its probably got a bit more material ...


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Front derailleurs are optimized for certain gaps between the rings and are limited to that - for example, the FD-6700 series from Shimano has a 16t front chainring difference (relating the outer and inner chainring size). There are also size constraints on the chainrings which determine the maximum and minimum size of chainrings you can use due to the ...



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