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22

I've had both. A really nice trailer and a child bike seat -- where the child sits between the rider and the handlebar (like the WeeRide Kangaroo Child Bike Seat). My daughter was ok with the trailer, but absolutely preferred the seat. I found with the seat in front of me, the weight didn't affect me almost at all, and if the bike was going to fall, I'd ...


17

I would never use anything but a trailer for safety reasons alone. The amount of force which can be applied to a small child's head from a fall from a bike seat can cause a severe injury. Even as an adult riding carefully on a bike path I've had an accident (dog running in front of me). With a trailer it is nearly impossible to flip or cause other blunt ...


13

We live in the country, and ride on gravel roads pretty much exclusively. We used a trailer for years and have kept it even though the kids outgrew it long ago. It remains useful years later when the kid(s) are riding solo. Our trailer is over 20 years old and we used it just last week, riding out to pick up our CSA veggies, which probably weighed more than ...


12

I'll not speak for the trailer, so much as against the rear child bike seat. My sister, was at 2 years old, riding in a high quality, bike shop sold and properly mounted bike seat. She was strapped in, and all was well. My dad was the captain of the vessel, and they were having a grand time. My dad hit a broken bottle on the road. Never saw it, he said. ...


12

In my opinion, this should NOT be done. Bicycles are very versatile, and one can not only use a single all-purpose bike for many purposes, but also to have/design specialty bikes, as it is the case of a Strida. And, by the way, is the case with a lot of child-carrying specific bikes and/or equipment. But, as it seems to me, a Strida is a SPECIALTY BIKE NOT ...


9

I've used both and prefer the trailer. Weatherproof, able to be swapped from one bike to another easily, able to be used on my good racer and mountain bike that would never fit a seat rack and a much lower center of gravity, you almost don't notice it's there while the child seat makes the bike less stable. Plus you can also fit a picnic bag our shopping in ...


9

I use both (we have an 18 month year old and a 3 year old). The trailer for going riding on tracks, small roads and old disused railways at the weekends, the seat for taking the older one to nursery on 'bigger' roads. The trailer is fun for both of them, plus they can sleep in it, and we can cover a bit of distance - the seat is probably more comfortable ...


9

that's me in the picture above! Hi, all. I carried both my babies by bike-- they came home in-arms onboard pedicabs, and started in the Yuba rig pictured quite young (baby #1 at 7 weeks, baby #2 at 3.5 weeks). The American Pediatric Association says babies should not ride on bikes until they are one year old and can support the weight of their head + a ...


8

The Bicycle Helmet Safety Institute, the US Consumer Product Safety Commission and the American Academy of Pediatrics agree that: ...children under 1 year of age should not be on bicycles. Children are just learning to sit unsupported at about 9 months of age. Until this age, infants have not developed sufficient bone mass and muscle tone to enable them ...


7

If you use a trailer its pretty much the same as using a pushchair (stroller) and indeed some double up (I wouldn't get one that doesn't) - you'll get a 5 point harness, a seat that reclines and you can get head cushions and the like too. Of course a trailer may not be practical in your circumstance (though I'd be surprised) but if it is it also helps deal ...


6

Consider at least one alternative to your (seemingly binary) choice - trike with frontal bay: Cargo bike makers carry high hopes or their more attractive cousin Kangaroobike by Winther I'm sure there are similar ones available in your locality so you don't have to consider complex logistics to get them from Denmark or even immigration to .dk in the ...


6

In the Netherlands the accepted age for first bicycle rides is about 9 months. The main point to watch out for is that many bicycle seats are a bit big for children that age so you have to take special care they can't bounce or climb out. Recently bicycle adapters for maxicosi chairs have appeared such as the one below. Thus you can also transport babies on ...


6

Having used them both, I say they are useful in different contexts. The bike seat I have is someting like this: combined with a dress guard like this: I have no fear for small feet getting stuck. The seat is much faster when you just want to pop over to get some milk and such, but its limiting when bringing more then one child with you or have more ...


6

Speaking as a parent and a former 3 year old, I'd advise against the rear bike seat. When I was 3, my mom bought one of those and popped me on it. We were out riding for a long time and I wanted to stop, so... I jammed my foot into the rear wheel. That was a REALLY bad idea. Lesson learned: don't stick foot in bike wheels. Now that I'm a parent myself, I ...


5

The best option is a trailer. The pull weight is fairly low, and the safety factor is far greater than on a child seat. To summarize what is a very long discussion, the child in a seat can't protect themselves, should you crash, and there is no way for you to protect them by guaranteeing you don't crash. A trailer has a lower center of gravity, a more ...


5

Your bike looks like it comes equipped with a full-suspension frame, and the suspension mechanism is located where one would usually attach the rack stays. This will make attaching a rear rack extremely difficult, and almost certainly less secure. I don't recommend attaching a rear rack to this bike, particularly not one that will be holding a child seat. ...


5

Here is a solution that actually worked very well -- and during our testing it appears safe to use, seemingly also in the event of an accident. (If you disagree, please explain why!) What we did was to loop a thick soft rubber band around the helmet's headband, and then secure the other end of the rubber band to the seatback using a bit of string through ...


5

To me it depends more on road and traffic conditions than age. If your roads are potholes linked by mounds of gravel and inhabited by mining trucks doing 100kph, 16 years old is too young. If you've got good roads with low speed limits and lots of bicycles, I'd be happy picking mother and child up from the hospital on a bakfiets. You should also be an ...


4

According to the user manual, the Blackburn rack is required. The seat snaps in to the rack, so the old Schwinn rack won't work.


4

A friend of mine wrote a blog post about this recently, building a pretty solid argument for a bike seat that goes between your seat and the handlebars: http://offbeatmama.com/2010/10/biking-with-toddlers We considered a bike cart, something like the InStyle Quick N EZ Bicycle Trailer, but honestly? I wasn't totally comfortable with the idea of Jasper ...


4

Maybe you'd be interested in a moederfiets (dutch for "mother's bike). This page appears to be selling them: http://www.tmannetje.nl/index.htm?errors/404.htm~mainFrame


4

The 6 year old is capable of pedaling, and would likely enjoying so. We have had success combining a single kid seat (the Yepp Maxi) with a Burley Piccolo on the back of a Yuba Mundo. This required some a bit of custom welding for Piccolo attachment, but it has been well worth it. This configuration gets used quite a lot by my wife and two kids. Here's what ...


3

Besides talking to individuals in your local bike shops, you can look for 'recreational' or 'touring' clubs. A Google Search for Bicycle Touring Clubs turns up clubs like our club in Utah, Bonneville Cycling Club (formerly the Bonneville Bicycle Touring Club). Larger recreational or touring clubs will usually rate their group rides by a couple of measures ...


3

The closest thing I have seen is the WeeRide Kangaroo that places the child in front of you. the support bar attaches to the seatpost and to the head tube, so if you had a second seat post you could leave the bar attached to that end and just connect it at the head tube. I don't know of anything that attaches just to the seat post, as the physics ...


3

Markijbema's comment on the original question touched on one aspect that nobody has mentioned: "A seat is easier to combine with a typical dutch bike, which is less race-y than the crazy bikes people in other countries seem to use for daily use" The construction and design of the bicycle determines how well it handles a load, either over the rear ...


3

We have a neck pillow to fit our youngest. Similar to this one... http://www.amazon.com/Noodlehead-Travel-Buddies-Neck-Pillow/dp/B000EOEAUS She went down a good bit of the the Katy trail using one of these in a Topeak rack seat. Works like a champ.


3

The Mundo is a great Cargo bike. The Bobike Junior seat base will fit on the rack without issues, but you may need to be creative in attaching the footrest portion, as you will not have the Bobike designed rack to work from. At the price you are looking, I'd say this is a great option. Shipping a bike is likely to push it well above that price, so I'd stay ...


3

I found this article - Tykes and Bikes - Injuries Associated With Bicycle-Towed Child Trailers and Bicycle-Mounted Child Seats The paper estimates the numbers of trailer-related injuries and the number of child seat injuries: there were an estimated 322 injuries associated with the use of a bicycle-towed trailer (95% CI, 158-486) and an estimated 2015 ...


2

The seat-back curves backwards towards its top. So if your child were a little higher in the seat (taller/older or, perhaps, sitting on a cushion), then their head would lean back more. Having a little padding behind the upper back and neck shoulders (so that there's more room for the head to fall backwards) might do too: a "travel neck pillow". The back ...



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