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50

You're absolutely right--children's bicycles with training wheels are good for exercise and entertainment, but they do little to nothing for balance. In my experience, the best way to teach anyone--children included--to ride a bicycle is to take the pedals off, lower the seat, and let them scoot & coast around until they develop the proper balance. ...


22

I've had both. A really nice trailer and a child bike seat -- where the child sits between the rider and the handlebar (like the WeeRide Kangaroo Child Bike Seat). My daughter was ok with the trailer, but absolutely preferred the seat. I found with the seat in front of me, the weight didn't affect me almost at all, and if the bike was going to fall, I'd ...


20

For safety reasons I prefer to be behind them. That way I can position myself on the road slightly further out then they are. This forces any overtaking vehicles to negotiate past me first and makes them provide a little more breathing space for my child in front. It certainly seems to prevent them trying to squeeze past.


17

I would never use anything but a trailer for safety reasons alone. The amount of force which can be applied to a small child's head from a fall from a bike seat can cause a severe injury. Even as an adult riding carefully on a bike path I've had an accident (dog running in front of me). With a trailer it is nearly impossible to flip or cause other blunt ...


16

An alternative to long tail bicycles is long wheelbase bicycles:


15

My dad taught me, my two sisters, my neices and nephews the same basic way. On grass. Get them on a two wheeler, no training wheels, but with helmet on, and start em up on the grass. Find a field that is smooth (maybe a slight downhill to start on) and push them and let them go. Grass is harder to ride on, but soft enough to fall on without damage that ...


14

Recommendations for transporting twins on a bike? A trailer. I'm a father myself - my son is nearly 9 months old, and I cycle a lot. In the area that I live, I wouldn't feel safe having him on the road with me at all. If I were offroad, or on more quiet roads, I would definitely prefer to have him in a trailer; they're more stable for you and your child ...


13

We live in the country, and ride on gravel roads pretty much exclusively. We used a trailer for years and have kept it even though the kids outgrew it long ago. It remains useful years later when the kid(s) are riding solo. Our trailer is over 20 years old and we used it just last week, riding out to pick up our CSA veggies, which probably weighed more than ...


12

I'll not speak for the trailer, so much as against the rear child bike seat. My sister, was at 2 years old, riding in a high quality, bike shop sold and properly mounted bike seat. She was strapped in, and all was well. My dad was the captain of the vessel, and they were having a grand time. My dad hit a broken bottle on the road. Never saw it, he said. ...


12

In my opinion, this should NOT be done. Bicycles are very versatile, and one can not only use a single all-purpose bike for many purposes, but also to have/design specialty bikes, as it is the case of a Strida. And, by the way, is the case with a lot of child-carrying specific bikes and/or equipment. But, as it seems to me, a Strida is a SPECIALTY BIKE NOT ...


11

He is 3..... he will do what he wants to, when and how he wants. I had a lot of trouble getting my boy off trainers (We did not go don the balance bike path). After many attempts involving removing them and putting them back on, I gave up and decided when he is ready (or old enough his peers laugh at him), he will want them removed. One day he just came up ...


10

Well, I was raised "old school". My dad put me on my first huffy - got behind me and pushed me down the driveway. Well, after 10 to 15 times busting my tail, I got the hang of staying up and was riding on my own in about 2 hours. Afterwards, as I rode through the yard (I grew up on a four acre yard) I crashed, got up and kept going. Just make your ...


10

You could always get a seat for one in front of you (handlebar mounted child seat) and the second behind you (conventional rack-mount child seat). Probably have to have them trade off to minimize fights, since the front seat is probably a lot more fun (and easier to watch the kid). I see a couple around town where the wife carries their kid in a handlebar ...


9

Followed some links from your links and found the actual text of the law, which summarizes the law as: Prohibits person from carrying child under six years of age on bicycle or in bicycle trailer. Elsewhere in Oregon law, a bicycle is defined as: [a human-powered vehicle] designed to travel with not more than three wheels in contact with the ...


9

I've used both and prefer the trailer. Weatherproof, able to be swapped from one bike to another easily, able to be used on my good racer and mountain bike that would never fit a seat rack and a much lower center of gravity, you almost don't notice it's there while the child seat makes the bike less stable. Plus you can also fit a picnic bag our shopping in ...


9

I use both (we have an 18 month year old and a 3 year old). The trailer for going riding on tracks, small roads and old disused railways at the weekends, the seat for taking the older one to nursery on 'bigger' roads. The trailer is fun for both of them, plus they can sleep in it, and we can cover a bit of distance - the seat is probably more comfortable ...


9

My children are 5, 9 and 11 and as the eldest ones are reasonably proficient, my 5 year old has not been cycling very long so she is a bit erratic, so I tend to go with: Eldest in front - I know I can trust him to stop at junctions correctly. 9 year old next - she is good at cycling, but doesn't always pay attention, so having her brother stop at junctions ...


8

This is pretty unconventional and not necessarily available to you, but here's some food for thought. Friends of mine had had a custom 'rack' built for their Kona Ute by a local rack & frame-builder to transport their two daughters (although they are much older). It came out exceptionally well (plus the girls love it): (Photo courtesy Lois Keenan, ...


8

Learning to ride a bike on a traditional pedal bike can be a scary experience for both parent and child. We've all been there. The initial excitement of chosing the brightly colored princess bike or the bike adorned with the latest comic book superhero quickly fades when reality sets in. That reality is that a standard pedal bike is the wrong tool for ...


8

The Bicycle Helmet Safety Institute, the US Consumer Product Safety Commission and the American Academy of Pediatrics agree that: ...children under 1 year of age should not be on bicycles. Children are just learning to sit unsupported at about 9 months of age. Until this age, infants have not developed sufficient bone mass and muscle tone to enable them ...


7

If you use a trailer its pretty much the same as using a pushchair (stroller) and indeed some double up (I wouldn't get one that doesn't) - you'll get a 5 point harness, a seat that reclines and you can get head cushions and the like too. Of course a trailer may not be practical in your circumstance (though I'd be surprised) but if it is it also helps deal ...


7

Most of of trailer-bikes are pretty similar: One speed. An inexperienced child will struggle to keep up when you pick up speed. She will also not be able to help much on the steep climbs. No brakes. Your hands do a lot of work, and your stopping distance is longer. BMX-style handlebar that can rock back and forth, as child size/shape changes Attaches to ...


7

Are you thinking to get a small BMX and take the drive train off instead of getting a run bike, so you can put the drive train back on when he's ready? Otherwise I don't quite understand the purpose of the question, sorry. If that is you're idea I'd suggest that's probably not a good idea. It's going to be difficult to find a BMX small enough for a two year ...


7

To answer your specific questions first: wrt weight: you are paying less for the children's bikes than for your own I hope? (they'll only fit on it for a few years after all) so kids' bikes use cheaper materials, cheaper usually means heavier in cycling gear. Don't expect to match your racer, but twice as much is a bit much even for a cheap model. Shop ...


6

The best thing about training wheels is that it get them on the bike and fast. They get a feel for what it takes to peddle, wear a helmet, etc... The other thing I found is that my kids had little or no problem making the transition to a riding without training wheels. Yeah it took some time the first day but they were used to the mechanics of riding if ...


6

In the Netherlands the accepted age for first bicycle rides is about 9 months. The main point to watch out for is that many bicycle seats are a bit big for children that age so you have to take special care they can't bounce or climb out. Recently bicycle adapters for maxicosi chairs have appeared such as the one below. Thus you can also transport babies on ...


6

I know that it does not answer your question directly, but there is an alternative to the trailer bike that you could consider as well. It is bicycle tow bar. The one that is available on the market is Trail-Gator. They can be bought for under £45 from amazon Photo from www.trail-gator.com It works reasonably well, it is not that stable as a good ...


6

Speaking as a parent and a former 3 year old, I'd advise against the rear bike seat. When I was 3, my mom bought one of those and popped me on it. We were out riding for a long time and I wanted to stop, so... I jammed my foot into the rear wheel. That was a REALLY bad idea. Lesson learned: don't stick foot in bike wheels. Now that I'm a parent myself, I ...


6

Having used them both, I say they are useful in different contexts. The bike seat I have is someting like this: combined with a dress guard like this: I have no fear for small feet getting stuck. The seat is much faster when you just want to pop over to get some milk and such, but its limiting when bringing more then one child with you or have more ...


6

Consider at least one alternative to your (seemingly binary) choice - trike with frontal bay: Cargo bike makers carry high hopes or their more attractive cousin Kangaroobike by Winther I'm sure there are similar ones available in your locality so you don't have to consider complex logistics to get them from Denmark or even immigration to .dk in the ...



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