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12

He is 3..... he will do what he wants to, when and how he wants. I had a lot of trouble getting my boy off trainers (We did not go don the balance bike path). After many attempts involving removing them and putting them back on, I gave up and decided when he is ready (or old enough his peers laugh at him), he will want them removed. One day he just came up ...


6

With young children is very rare for them to have the hand strength to cause a problem with brake strength. Their hands are small and weak, giving small reach hence low level action in the brake handle. Children bikes are built using cheap components (Even the components on the best children bike rate just above BSO adult bike components) The bikes for my ...


4

Discussions of parenting is always dangerous, but what is the hurry? Children don't understand work motifs (i.e., do A, so you can accomplish B) and seem to learn best in play motifs (or that is at least what my partner keeps hammering into my thick scull). I am in the opposite position, I wish my 3-year-old would rider her strider bike more as we used to ...


3

When my 4 year old transitioned from her run bike to her first pedal bike, the one thing she struggled with was negotiating her pedals. She would try to 'run' on her pedal bike, and got frustrated real quick trying to figure out how to negotiate her pedals and cycle her feet. I think a trailer bike would be a good transition from a run bike to their first ...


3

You have to make a distinction between the front and rear brakes. Strong rear brakes aren't dangerous, but strong front brakes (when in inexperienced hands) can cause a crash. For a bike that small, I'd go with a weaker front brake. The kid won't be going fast enough to warrant big stopping power. The rear brake isn't as important. I would leave it ...


3

When my daughter was around three, we started out with the trailer bike and then graduated to a tandem with the pedals adapted. She had been on training wheels on her own little bike since she was two and was doing just fine; being on the trailer bike gave her an opportunity to go places, to feel like a big kid and to develop an appreciation for what ...


3

Even if you decide to buy the seat now, presumably there'd be an issue as she grows? And by the sounds of things, it won't be long before she passes the upper limit. So I'd look at other options, which as I see it, are: a trailer one of those things where they're sitting on their own saddle, over their own wheel, but are actually being towed by you (I ...


2

Taught my four year old daughter to ride a two wheeler using training wheels. Wanted to try a balance bike, but a free bike fell in my lap that was perfect for her so I couldn't justify the expense of a balance bike. The key with training wheels that so many people don't do is that you need to raise them up slightly as the child gets used to riding on them ...


2

Based only on my personal experience with my first son I would suggest to use a Balance Bike starting from age of 2/3 depending on how tall the kid is (you're daughter in this case). I blogged about my experience here: http://thebestformysonen.blogspot.it/2014/09/the-best-balance-bike.html


1

There do exist child seats that support higher weights, for example this one: http://www.yepp.nl/uk/Collection/Yepp-Junior. I rembember this style of seats to be very common in The Netherlands for kids up to ages of 8 or so (although they often also cycle on their own). This does require a bike with a rear rack that actually supports that weight too, and I ...



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