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6

I did the same thing for my son when he was 2. After a year and a half, he just "looked" ready. I knew he could ride so I had him try pedaling. I have a short hill in the front yard and put him near the bottom. He was determined to NOT ride properly, so after about 25 feet he "fell" off and said "SEE!! I can't do it!" I laughed and said, "You did it almost ...


3

I have no experience with kids in that age, but I think the most important skill she can have is to cover a large enough distance without stepping the ground. How much is "enough" is debatable, but there is sort of a "qualitative" difference between running with the aid of a scooter (long, but predictable, consecutive steps), and giving the scooter some ...


2

However you proceed, get a bike that fits the child. None of this "(s)he'll grow into it." Our then 4 yr old son had a bike and he was somewhat wobbly on it and I took great pains to supervise closely when he rode. One day we borrowed a neighbor's small bike (no training wheels), smaller than I'd ever seen before. It fit our son beautifully. And to our ...


2

You should only need to replace the sprocket, nothing else. If you put on a smaller sprocket to get higher gearing/slower pedalling you need a smaller sprocket, not a larger one. You may need to remove a chain link. Those parts should be standard, the same as on an adult bike, and any bike shop should be able to make the switch. Coaster brakes are common in ...


1

Very inexpensive rebranded bike with very inexpensive tires which you can't source individually. Nothing wrong with that given that it's a child's bike, but that is the situation. Your chances of finding that exact tire are slim, and there's no really compelling reason for you to hunt it down anyway. The product you can get off the shelf is going to be at ...


1

The short answer is no. Cheap suspension forks do only add weight and complexity as you say, and give very little actual suspension. My personal experience with cheap forks for adult bikes are that they can take away some road chatter, but with the increased weight and complexity it is hardly worth it. The only worthwhile reason to have it must be that the ...


1

I found this article particularly enlightening. The short takeaway is that balance is the most important thing (before direction) Keep going until the balance is good and everything else will follow. My wife and I are discussing at the moment the best time to get our kids onto balance bikes.



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