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21

You're talking about a "bunny hop" and it can be done at speed on a loaded bike but it's high risk. You'd almost certainly be better off jumping off the bike and rolling. US Bike Trials call it a "side hop", but in anglonesia I've mostly heard it called a bunny hop. Here's a photo of the 2006 Cycle Messenger World Champion doing more or less that at about ...


19

In my experience, no. The problem is that however polite you try to be you're taking the lane so you're in their way. My commute takes me over a narrow one-lane-each-way bridge that's a bit of a choke point, so it's busy. It's also a raised bridge, so sight lines are very poor. Since I ride it twice a day I've had the chance to experiment with some ...


10

Short answer: yes, there is a way to do it. I fully support Mσᶎ's answer and have more to say than will fit in comments. Firstly, regarding the original premise. You happen to look over your shoulder (or in your mirror) and see a vehicle approaching from behind, either fully in the bike lane, or close enough that they can't safely pass. If I'm riding ...


8

The "trick" you're looking for is a side hop. It's really a variation on a bunny hop. Basically, you perform a standard bunny hop but when the handlebars and front wheel reach their zenith, you pull the front end over the obstacle while pushing them forward. The forward motion pulls the rear wheel up, as with a standard bunny hop. However, you additionally ...


8

Some tips I've gathered from being on both sides of the fence. Since you're specifically asking riding safely and minimizing motorist antagonism, there are some which will work but might not appeal to your sense of justice/fairness: Even higher visibility. One way of antagonising drivers is to appear at the last moment, since they won't have time to plan ...


6

You can't really burn "tummy fat." Your body has an order that it will store fat in and it will lose fat in the reverse order. You can lose bodyfat, but it goes away in the reverse order that you put it on. You can make it appear that you've proportionally lost more weight in your tummy by building up the muscles there.


5

When you say "to burn tummy fat", presumable you're talking about weight loss and general toning? What worked for me was a short, 10-minute / 2-point-something km commute, twice a day, five days a week, over two or three years. Because the ride was so short I was able to give pretty much 100% for the whole ride, with natural stops at red lights. I went ...


4

A good folding bike should ride just as well and last just long as a traditional bike. BikeFriday has a reputation for bikes that feel "normal." As far as maintenance goes there is very little difference. From my experience the only thing that needs more frequent maintenance are the cable housings. This is because cables usually have to make more complex ...


3

In general, yes it is rude. But there can be times when it's acceptable. I'm sure we all understand that you are trying to maximize your own safety. It is a tricky balance to achieve. Especially since how you ride depends on the local driver and cyclist cultures, and local laws. In many places we cyclists struggle for respect and acceptance by the motoring ...


2

I have thought about this a lot. What usually works for me is raising the left hand palm in and fingers up and covering my ear and lowering the head slightly. a gesture of submission, the covering of the ear "please don't yell at me for my mistake". Then raising palm upward and forward in a surrender mode. I am sorry.


2

"I can safely ride between cars....", You an judge spacing "a car come up from behind and clip me while overtaking." Car drivers cannot judge spacing. Is this dichotomy the root of the issue? Your (mine as well) perception is that because you are in control, you are safer than when not in control. Turn this around, and the car driver feels lane splitting ...


2

FWIW, Fixed gear off roading is possible if more difficult than needed. This site has lots of useful info. http://63xc.com/ I ran my Surly Cross Check as a fixed gear scorcher for season or two and it's way to make easy trails hard. It's definitely not for everybody and the downhills can be brutal. I'd encourage you to go for disk brakes on the front if ...


2

A folding bike just does ride as well and is not as efficient. Small frame and small wheels. You are going to pay more for a folding bike. Brand does matter - some of the high end ride nicely and some low end ride badly.


2

There is not really difference in maintenance. You have the same brakes, gears (rear), shocks, wheels, bearings. The only addition is the bolts where you fold the bike. About the commute - folding bikes have smaller wheels, which ends up in: Decreased speed (for people like me who loves high speed it's significant). At some point you can see yourself ...


2

After trying to live with a folding bike, here are my observations. Most, (all) foldy bikes have a feel different from a regular road or MTB. so the feeling is never going to be the same. There might be some flex from the handlebars, they could be slow or feel as though they are going to fall over.... So I think to a large extent it would be best to put ...


1

I would suggest first deciding what kind of bike you'd like. Road vs. Mountain vs. Hybrid. Road - more aggressive positioning (lean more forward) for aerodynamic benefits. Thinner tires. Mountain - more upright, sturdy/heavy. Wider tires for offroad Hybrid/Cross - something in between. Usually road type bike with clearance for slightly wider tires. In ...


1

I'll second Eric's answer, but with a little more detail. There is no way to exercise that will produce "spot removal" of fat. The only way to do that is via liposuction. Each person's body will deposit fat differently. For instance, my body starts with deposits on my lower back, then on my belly, and then my upper arms and face. Other people start on their ...


1

Folding bikes are great. Many higher-end folding bikes have derailleurs or geared hubs, which means that they can be just as fast as a regular bicycle. The only things that you lose are: Stability because of the smaller wheels. This can be a positive as a city bicycle as they are more nimble (i.e., less stable) at slower speeds. Harder ride. Because the ...


1

First how is the bike set up? 25mm tires versus 32m (or bigger) is different. Clip versus clip-less is confusing. Are you snapped in like a SPD? There are a few hops Straight hop Pretty much need to be snapped in then lower you body and jump and pull up on pedals and bars. This is great for hopping up curbs but you need to be pointed at the curb. And ...


1

This isn't really a full answer, and I'm deliberately steering clear of groupsets, but there are a couple of things that are maybe worth considering: For 80% tarmac/asphalt and 20% trail, maybe you could consider two sets of wheels, if you can afford to do so? (Actually, all you really need is two sets of tyres, but it is far quicker to swap a wheel than a ...


1

I have two CX. One is single speed (not fixed) and one multi. As for fixie? That is a no on the trail as you lose ground cleareance. With roots, rocks, and drop offs you need to stay on top of the bike. I have single speed mountain bike that I would hate as as fixie. That is a light racing style frame with carbon fork. Decide if you want to go for ...


1

As @mattnz mentions, it is most likely illegal to split the lane in the manner you describe. While traffic laws differ from place to place, almost any locale with defined lanes will have a law saying that riding/driving between lanes (for longer than it takes to change lanes) is illegal. I strongly advise you to check and follow your local laws. Almost any ...


1

Whenever I hold up a car for more than a couple of seconds, I make a point of giving them a big thumbs up or wave of thanks, just to let them know I'm not being selfish or oblivious to them. I'll also look out for a safer place for them to overtake and swing back into secondary position as soon as I safely can. Granted this only helps once the irritated ...


1

These first two are really more basic skills, but: Give cars enough space that an opening door won't take you down. I had one pull me to the ground once, fortunately, it only got the edge of my hand grip, and at low speed, but it turned my handlebars and took me straight down. I was thankful not to be injured. I've heard tales of much worse. Be ready to ...


1

Look into car's side-mirrors Very simple advice, but that it takes time to master. Gazing into parked cars mirrors will give you a warning sign of a possible open door or car that will incorporate into the traffic flow: no person reflected, great! You should be able of doing this quickly and from the reflection decide what to do: it is common that drivers ...



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