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14

In my experience, no. The problem is that however polite you try to be you're taking the lane so you're in their way. My commute takes me over a narrow one-lane-each-way bridge that's a bit of a choke point, so it's busy. It's also a raised bridge, so sight lines are very poor. Since I ride it twice a day I've had the chance to experiment with some ...


10

For a city commuter bike, don't bother with disk brakes - go for simple rim brakes. You'll want the reliability over all else. You don't need disks for most types of road cycling, as the limiting factor for grip is likely to be your tyre anyway. As regards shifters, go with whatever is comfortable for you. I like the combination of brakes and gear levers in ...


6

1- Disc brakes perform better in wet weather. If you choose rim brakes, aluminum rims offer a better braking surface than carbon rims. Hidraulic brakes adjust for pad wear and both pads move inwards to press against the disc surface. Mechanical brakes push one pad (usually the outer one) onto the disc, and the disc has to flex to touch the other pad. 2.- ...


5

Short answer: Height does matter (in fact, there are multiple "heights" which you can find out about in the long answer's links), but there are a ton of other factors (e.g. top tube length which is probably more important). The bike's geometry is what determines how well it works for you. Long answer: What you need is a bike fit (which can be done at most ...


5

The last one. As already mentioned, you're describing a bunny hop. Allowing the rear to hit the curb - even if there is relatively little weight over it - will increase the risk of pinch punctures, potential rim damage, and it will slow you down considerably more than a clean bunny hop. Hops are weird. Once you can do them you will never understand why you ...


5

Some tips I've gathered from being on both sides of the fence. Since you're specifically asking riding safely and minimizing motorist antagonism, there are some which will work but might not appeal to your sense of justice/fairness: Even higher visibility. One way of antagonising drivers is to appear at the last moment, since they won't have time to plan ...


3

Generally you should try the bike, and see if how it feels, including using the components feels good to you, if not look for something else. If you will be riding no matter what the weather is, I would recommend looking for bike that has internal hub brakes, a full chain-case (which with gearing would normally require hub gears too), and full mud guards ...


2

I have had my phone attached to the handlebars in a little sleeve made of gaffer tape and some clear plastic I got out of the recycle bin and it's been good for a few years (I've replaced the sleeve thingy a few times as it disintegrated). For protection it's got a strip of high density foam at the back of it so that it doesn't clunk on the gooseneck when I ...


2

I've worn the respro in Beijing for about a year where the air pollution apparently causes lung cancer. Of course, that is a long term effect that is hard to measure immediately, but I can say that the air smells much cleaner and I "feel" better after riding through traffic with the mask on as opposed to without it. Your face gets a bit sweaty, but it can be ...


2

Trials on the N95 concluded that it didn't really do a good job filtering chemical pollution. http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN74390617 and the results: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23013369


1

Yea, baby, fit and geometry make all the difference on a bike. Without being too scientific here, the height of the saddle must be such that your leg is ALMOST but not quite fully extended when your pedal is at bottom of the stroke; there should be a very minor flex in the knee when your pedal is at bottom stroke and your ankle should be in a mid-flex ...


1

If you mean Vancouver, BC, I live to the south of you between Tacoma and Seattle and commute 7 miles one-way up and down hills year-round. I use a steel touring bike with a front triple and wide gearing on the rear, though I really only use the granny for hills on longer touring rides. No bar-ends for me in commuting. I need to change gears too often and ...


1

You might find more general commuter bike buying, and bicycle commuting advise in these questions: What do you wish someone had told you before your first commute? Bicycle for 2 x 30mins commute My general advise for your specific points would be: Rain IMHO means you want fenders, unless you enjoy turning up at work with mud (or worse) all over your ...


1

I now have gone with this Bike: http://www.simpel-ch.de/velos/ww/nuvinci_360/herrenvelo2012.html I have this bike for a year now and I am pretty happy with it. It does not allow very sportive riding, but it is nearly maintenance-less, since the chain is fully enclosed by the protector (which rattles sometimes). The rear rack allows mounting a Basket. I ...


1

Look into car's side-mirrors Very simple advice, but that it takes time to master. Gazing into parked cars mirrors will give you a warning sign of a possible open door or car that will incorporate into the traffic flow: no person reflected, great! You should be able of doing this quickly and from the reflection decide what to do: it is common that drivers ...



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