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19

Yes, pressurized water can damage your bicycle, specifically by washing the grease out of bearing areas. Note, this is pressurized water. Using a garden hose without a sprayer is unlikely to do damage. Using a garden hose with a shower type sprayer is unlikely to cause damage. Low pressure, so that it doesn't break the seals, is the point. (I avoid the ...


16

A degreaser, whether aerosol or not, is an excellent way to remove grease from the chain. http://www.finishlineusa.com/products/citrus-cleaner.htm http://www.finishlineusa.com/products/speed-clean.htm The degreaser will reduce the amount of elbow grease required but be careful and use a set of nitrile gloves to protect your hands. My simple chain ...


14

Protective plates? You mean Fenders/Mudguards? I can think of 3 things that could help, other than simply bringing a change: Bigger fenders (wider, and/or go down the tire more). Basically, some fenders are better than others. A front fender that's wider than the tire with a stay (rod) going back for support that hugs the tire fairly closely and ...


11

I'd think that oil would repel water (make washing harder) and attract dirt. Maybe since we're in such a wet climate (Andrew and I live near each other) it's decent advice to keep the rain/wet trails/dirt of your bike but I still think that your bike would gather dirt even in the West Coast rain. Especially in areas that are hard to get at like around the ...


11

I know it sounds too simple, but these bags are made to be cleaned (assuming yours is unlined. If it's lined, you'll never get it out). First, try dish soap and water. Citrus scents seem to cut the smell best, but that may be a personal preference. If that is not enough, then the next best option is to use a diluted solution of something like Pine Sol or ...


10

Overview As needed or as inspired, rinse off bike with water, clean with soapy water and degreaser, wipe down, rinse off. In practice, I do this every month or two or... of commuting. And yes, there are advantages to cleaning your bike; a clean bike will last longer, perform better, and serve as proof of the love of a proud owner. Materials rags sponges ...


10

Water bottles?? Clean and hygienic?? If you can scrape off the crust of road mud on the spout they're clean enough. (Actually, I just rinse mine out in very hot tap water, though for a brand new one I'll use a few drops of dish soap to help get rid of the manufacturing oils and the plastic taste. Sometimes for new bottles I'll fill them with hot water ...


10

Most ordinary baby wipes will get grease out of clothing if you get to the stain quickly enough - or, at least, get enough of it out that the rest will later wash out. You can also carry spray-n-wash pads or keep them in your desk at work. However, baby wipes are also good for cleaning your hands - handy after changing a flat, or fiddling with a bike chain. ...


10

Rain, hail, and snow don't hurt a chain. Salt makes it rust, and dirt wears it out. Salt: You won't get all the salt out without removing the chain from the bike. The chain is doomed. You can, however, easily delay this till spring with regular application of wet chain lube. A bit of rust won't hurt if you ride regularly. Dirt: Given that the chain only ...


9

Cycling Tips has some useful pointers. To summarize: Degrease the drivetrain. Wash the degreaser off the drivetrain with the brush and sponge. Wash the rest of the bike with soapy water and the sponge. Rinse the bike off with the clean water and sponge (or a low pressure hose). You can dry the bike by wiping it down with a cloth or let it air dry. It’s a ...


9

There is a lot of sense to @Neil Fein's 'get used to it' attitude as, with some garments, you are just not going to get the oil out. 'Prevention is better than cure' definitely applies, but we are past that, aren't we... In the office environment you have tea making facilities, including a sink with some washing up liquid and maybe some disposable ...


9

I've heard you should keep high pressure water away from your bike, because it can easily work it's way into the bearings, even sealed ones, especially around the bottom bracket and wheels. Pressurized water will push the oil out of the spaces between the chain links, and it's probably not a good idea to use pressurized water at all. You should be able to ...


8

My method, which works very well and is fairly quick (although it required initial shopping and drinking some Gatorade): Edit: this requires having one of those reusable 'gold links' to detach/reattach the chain at will. Remove the chain and put a string on it to fish it out of the gatorade bottles Simple Green: I have an old gatorade bottle full of ...


8

I use a degreaser and chain cleaner to get the grime out - usually once a week. It's really surprising how much gunk coats the chain and cassette. I also take the rear wheel off and use a clean rag to get in between the gears to make sure it's all shiny and clear of stuff that will wear out the drivetrain prematurely (I have to replace the drivetrain every ...


8

For a one-off ride in the salt like that, you should be fine for now if you lube the chain and wipe it down. Give the bike a good washing whenever the weather warms up enough to turn on the outside spigot. In my experience of riding through road salt (and grit, which is probably just as bad) on a regular basis, the bike tends to need a new chain every ...


8

That particular Shimano freehub can be disassembled, but it is quite a job to get it back together afterward. There are around 80 2mm bearings in two different locations in the freehub, and a skilled and practiced mechanic has roughly a 60% chance of opening without losing parts, and successfully getting it back together. The good news is, there is a tool ...


7

It depends on the style of master link and how much chain tension is in your setup. An SRAM power link needs about 1-2mm of chain slack to unhook the link. If you can find this amount of slack, it should work with most types of master link. If your chain doesn't have 2mm of play, but isn't too tight, a master link that snaps off the side (like the first ...


7

You can use a spray bottle with diluted degreaser to spray down the chain and wipe it with an old towel to get most of the dirt off; or if it's really sandy or muddy you can use regular soap and water and a sponge. Then clean and lube the chain the way you normally would. After using several different plastic mechanical chain cleaners my favorite method is ...


7

There's a saying that a clean bike is a happy bike. You really can't clean a bike too much. Make sure to clean the bike more often in the winter when riding on road salt, which is bad for the drivetrain. For all bikes, I'd definitely clean the drivetrain if it gets muddy. Mud can interfere with shifting and braking. Do not put oil or grease on the rims. ...


7

The fundamental problem with synthetic garments is that some of the fibres (particularly early nylon and current polyester) have spaces within the fibres that are perfect-sized cocoons for growing the bacteria that give rise to body odour. 'Boil wash' the garment to kill the bacteria and you damage the fabric. Cold-wash to look after the fabric and you don't ...


7

In the winter when the garden hose is disconnected I use a watering can filled with warm water to wash the dirt/salt off the bike before taking it in. I use mild detergent soap to speed up the removal of oil and grease then pour the warm water from the can to remove the soap.


7

From time to time, I soak it in water with a bit of glicerin soap ("neutral", recommended on manuals) disolved, in a bucket. I leave it a whole day submerged (have to put something heavy over the helmet, otherwise it floats out). My rationale is this: when you submerge, the natural diffusion process inside liquids makes the soap penetrate the sweat, and ...


7

Park Tool recommends their own product: I used to hate gloves for anything (car, bike, whatever) until I got used to wearing them while in Iraq and Afghanistan. Originally I used the Mechanix Wear gloves and I still like them for working on my car:


6

Depends on what you want from your bike. If you're bike is a high performance, lightweight machine and you expect many years of trouble free performance in tough conditions, then wash it as frequently as you can. If it's a knock-about treadly that you use for the short commute to and from work and for getting your shopping, then wash it as infrequently as ...


6

Road salt is pretty bad for your bike, and I would recommend cleaning it as often and as thoroughly as you can. It's my understanding that snow and ice can cause rust on steel frames, so you'll want to get those off as well. On an aluminum frame, I'd be concerned with the paint -- and with screws & bolts (usually made of steel). I've never had a bike ...


6

I personally think that its a little subjective how often one would strip down a setup. I believe it really depends on riding styles, type & range of equipment and also sometimes events. Riding Styles I personally do freeride and XC. My FR (mostly street) setup receives more attention due to the abuse I put it through (i am heeavy!) - though, I dont ...


6

Use the garden hose without sprayer, just using your thumb to spray. Avoid spraying hard/long at bearing areas. And when you do spray at a bearing, do it obliquely, not straight into the bearing. Or just let the bike be dirty. That doesn't hurt it either. (Compressed air can damage a bike too, if used improperly, by driving dirt into the bearings.)


6

Sad to say, not worth the effort! However, if you are a bulk user of cable outer then you can invest in a big reel of the stuff (obviously genuine Shimano) and some Shimano cable cutters (TL-CT-10). Note the price is wrong: http://www.madison.co.uk/productinfo.aspx?catref=6Y1+9801 However, order by Madison part code from your LBS and get the brake cable ...


6

In my experience, the only part which is problematic to clean is the chain (and possibly drivetrain). In your situation, I would do the following: Take the chain apart from the bike, and clean it shaking inside a plastic container with a small amount of your preferred degreaser or solvent, replacing the solvent a few times untill it comes out clean. This ...


6

Your hub has a normal freewheel, like described by Matt Adams (ratchet with pawls). There are some models which have spring-loaded cilinders mounted around "tilted" teeth: when you spin it to one side, the cilinders slip. When you spin it to the other side, the cilinders are caught between opposite surfaces, and torque is transmitted by friction (there is ...



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