Hot answers tagged

9

There is a similar question (but not the same question) here and here. The short version is that regular upkeep -- chain replacement, cassette replacement, lubrication, brakes (modulo say rebleeding a hydraulic set), tires & tubes you should do at home as needed (and I've given some guidelines for the first two), and you should be familiar with basic ...


7

I would avoid doing this. If the Teflon lube has any kind of solvent in it (which it probably does to carry the Teflon), it will break down the grease in the bottom bracket. Eventually, the grease will thin out enough that it will flow out of the bottom bracket, and No More Lube=A Very Bad Thing. If you are using a basic cartridge bottom bracket, they are ...


6

Yes. All those tools require is that the chain moves through them. They do require the chain move through in a particular direction so you will probably find that you end up with the handle on the bike side of the chain rather than on the outside, which will be mildly inconvenient. But it beats not being able to clean your chain at all. Here's what I do, I ...


6

Your bike has a conventional threaded bottom bracket (square taper). Since its a relatively new bike, it shipped with a sealed (*) bottom bracket. So, the only maintenance that can be done is tightening the bottom bracket cups (which hold the bottom bracket in place) and replacing the bottom bracket itself (which is a sealed unit containing the bearings, ...


6

Modern Cyclo-cross bikes typically used bottom brackets with sealed cartridge bearings. No real maintenance required, except to replace when worn out. When cleaning your bike, be careful as high water pressure can force debris past the seals and into cartridge bearings. Once a year replacement is pretty typical for bottom brackets with outboard bearings. ...


5

No, of course not. Having your bike wet and unlibricated for one day won't damage it in any way. Washing it and letting it unlubricated for long period of time will cause you some issues. But one day is not a problem...


4

Yes you should clean the chain occasionally. Where does the dirt go if you don't clean it off ? True that dry lubricants are not as sticky as wet ones, but there's still dirt there and it needs to come off, not get further into your chain's gubbins.


4

As mentioned in the other answers, there could be several reasons that your rear tire is always muddier than the front after a wet commute. The front tire splashes mud on the rear of the bike. There is more weight on the rear tire, causing it to sink deeper into mud. Your power is being transferred to the rear tire, creating more friction than on the front....


4

As @Carel mentioned, try using rubbing alcohol to clean the discs. It's often called Isopropyl Alcohol or isopropanol. You may have inadvertently contaminated your pads which often means replacements. Did you use any sprays which may have blown on to the disc? Frame protector and water displacers like gt-85 or wd-40 will play havoc with your braking power. ...


4

The salt from excessive sweating will corrode your headset bolts, bottle cage bolts, can corrode aluminum alloy in handlebars and can affect the paint on your frame. Riding outside on the road is less of an issue because sweat evaporates more easily and the force of the air rushing by keeps the sweat from settling easily. However, on a trainer, everything ...


4

Depends a little on what conditions you ride in, but the basic steps are all the same. Take the bike outside. If you have a leather saddle, remove it. If you have a bike computer then remove that too, as well as any bags or tools. Rinse the bike with a shower setting on your hose. Do not use any sort of jet. use biodegradable dishwash and warm water ...


4

I had one of these. With the exception of the narrow brush (which can be bought seperately), whos curved, toothed end is wonderful for cleaning gunk out of cassettes, I found the tool a waste of money. I wound up throwing mine away. If you're seeing a lot of grime, your problem is almost certainly not the conditions in your area, although this can ...


3

Absolutely it will work. Remember for about half the cycle, your chain is upside down anyway. Some people prefer to use these machines to clean the chain on the bottom (low tension) part and others prefer to be above the chainstay on the high tension part. Personally I think low tension makes more sense, because it allows the cleaning fluid to get in and ...


3

'Sweat is slightly salty, but its not going to harm metal in a bike or human's lifespan.' Not true - I recently replaced badly corroded bars after only 10 months use. I only ride on the road too. I contacted the supplier who told me it was not covered by warranty due to 'poor maintenance'. They advised me that I should wash the bike every time I rode it ...


3

Dishwashing liquid and a small amount of baking soda, warm water, on an old sock or rag. Wipe with damp rag. Clean and bright. Most of the dirt on my handlebar tape is from cleaning debris from tires while cycling.


3

I too have made this blunder. The freehub buddy does work, but isn't in my toolbox. The simplest thing I do is to first have the body mounted on the wheel. Be sure that one of the two slits in the body is at the six o'clock position. I then add just enough automatic transmission fluid (atf) to the body so that it covers up to the axle hole. I spin the ...


2

Nope. Bar tape is cheap enough to replace every couple years, and makes the bike look nice. Throw your gloves into the wash periodically with your other riding clothes. Sweat is slighly salty, but its not going to harm metal in a bike or human's lifespan. The oils and grease from mechanical parts is more likely to affect paint than sweat. That said, ...


2

Spraying a bike with water doesn't actually remove all grease that exists on the chain and similar otherwise unprotected surfaces. So letting it dry off for a day is fine. Even letting it stand for weeks is fine, if it is stored in a dry place with no condensation. However the situation is different if you actually do remove all lubrication from an ...


1

A credit card usually does the trick. It's flexible enough to bend slightly but firm enough to serve as a scraper/pusher. It's soft enough that it won't scratch most finishes.


1

How exactly to clean it depends on the type of dirt, so try to figure that out first. If it's just regular dust, possibly mixed with moisture and some grease/oil to make it sticky, regular household cleaners should work well. Try to get something mildly (!) abrasive, such as a metal cleaner (used for cleaning stainless steel metal sinks) with a mild ...


1

As any others have said, nope, nothing will reeeaaallllyyy happen. The only thing you need to worry about is if the water sits for too long on parts such as your chain. Just make sure you buy proper lubricants, and NOT WD40's spray can!!!! ;) Also, if you plan to do that often, it's best to just get a cheap rag and wipe the bike down to dry off most of the ...


1

I tend to do a quick "Wipe down with an oily rag" after anything more than a quick ride to the shops. It does help but I will get the chain off and give it a full valet job every couple of months, more often in the winter.


1

There are two parts in a bicycle you need to keep clean, rest is just aesthetics. Some bicycles have other moving parts, suchs as suspension forks, that need to be kept clean. Drivetrain (chain, cassette, chainrings) Brake surfaces (either disc or rim) and brake pads For drivetrain the steps are: Use degreaser (preferably one made for bicycle cleaning ...


1

I would not touch the bearings without the correct tools. You may get them apart, and will probably get them back together, but won't be able to adjust them very easily and won't be able to get the lock nut tight. For a novice, with the right tools, the job can be a but fiddly as getting the adjustment right will take a few goes. Without the right tools,a ...


1

To get rid of rust, use steel wool with some sort of acidic solvent. I have actually used vinegar on some rusty components before. My biggest piece of advice for bike maintenance is do a little after every ride. Whether that is wiping the chain free of dust or just taking a cloth to the frame; when you do this, all the small things don't add up and become ...


1

Spokes - a "steelo" or other brand of pot scrub. Use warm soapy water, because the dirt is generally dirt not oils. Its hard to get up in by the hub where the spokes cross - you might find a toothbrush useful. If its a rear wheel, remove the freewheel/cassette first, and for either wheel try to not flood the bearings. Use clean water to rinse. You ...


1

Just adding some experiences that I've had biking through several winters with my hard tail. SALT: It really comes down to keeping the salt at bay. It's doable, but it takes work. The main thing to do in the winter is once a week; wipe down the chain (dry), apply your lube, wipe again, lube again, and wipe off the excess. Also, you'll want to use a few ...


1

I've used Cif or Jif as it used to be called. Its a cream bathroom and kitchen surface cleaner. Works wonders.



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