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16

I am a industrial chemist and manufacture commercial grade degreasers and other cleaners for a as my occupation... this is what i recommend for a home-made degreaser... Firstly there are three main parts to a degreaser... they are as follows: Alkaline booster (to increase the pH to allow the dirt and grease and grime to be effectively removed for faster ...


6

Ultimately its going to be down to how zealous you want to be. When you think of cleaning a chain, you need to think of two things. First, there is the cleaning - getting off the dirt and lube that has caked itself onto the chain. Then, there is lubing the chain to make it run nicely, (As part of a lube you'd maybe give the chain a rub with a dry cloth to ...


6

If odor is your main concern, I can highly recommend the so-called boot bananas. You put them in your shoes whenever you are not using them, and it slowly kills all odors. I have a pair of boot-bananas for a year now, and I am very enthousiastic about it, all odors are gone since I use them. It did not use them for my cycling shoes though (they don't smell ...


5

If you believe you have diagnosed the problem then a clean and a service should be all that is required. You don't have to remove the FD. WD-40 will not displace mud effectively. I would: use a hose with a decent amount of pressure to remove the gunk, wait for it to dry. (be careful not to spray around the bottom bracket) apply WD-40 to any moving parts ...


5

As a bicycle mechanic in the Netherlands, I always advice not to use a waterhose. Rain doesn't get into your bearings and chain, while water from a waterhose sometimes does get in nasty places. I sometimes see chains or even a bearing which is rusted because the oil/grease is 'hosed away'. You can safely use water out of a bucket, with a sponge. But do not ...


4

I've found the simplest way is to get it rinsed off outside if you can, buckets of warm/hot water work well, then bring it inside and wash in the tub. If you've got a garage or laundry room, this becomes even easier by basically sponge-bathing your bike with a rag. Another alternative, but sometimes less worth it, is to take the bike to a self-wash car wash ...


4

For a complete clean and overhaul, which works wonders for shifting performance, the Park Tool dérailleur overhaul instructions cannot be beaten. See http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help/rear-derailleur-overhaul


4

Lean the bike slightly against something with the derailer facing out. Slide a section of newspaper up behind the derailer and large cog and let it drape down over the tire and onto the ground. (This protects the tire and absorbs most of the solvent.) Get an old toothbrush and a spray can of (no shouting now!) WD40 or some other similar solvent. ...


4

Simple, yet powerful solution - pour max 1 teaspoon of sodium bicarbonate (baking soda, found in any store) into the shoes before or after wearing them. It will kill the bacteria and any other "stuff" that produces bad smell. It has no negative effects on skin whatsoever, except when applying it to freshly shaven skin - as it may cause inflammation of the ...


4

I try to not wash cycle shoes. I have found a boot/shoe dryer to be effective with odor. The old style without a fan seems to work better for shoes. Leave the dryer in for a day and cook that bacteria. No I don't have medical information the dryer gets hot enough to kill bacteria but it seems to work. It gets rid of the odor and the next time they ...


4

Soaking them in a bucket of very diluted bleach water (~1 cap in a 5 gallon bucket) overnight should help with the odor. As far as drying, either grab a fan, or there are a lot of commercial solutions available. They're mostly marketed for winter/ski boots, but they'll obviously work for any type of wet shoe.


4

You've basically got three sets of bearings on your bike: hubs, bottom bracket, and headset. It's pretty easy to check if the grease has been blown out of any of them by listening to them spin or by checking for play in the part. If anything sound gravelly when you spin it the bearing definitely needs some love. The wiggle check is a little more ...


3

The main question is why are they needing cleaning, as this drives the need for chemicals. If its normal road and trail mud and grime, as suggested in the comments, hot water and a nylon scrubbing pad (even a "goldilocks" type metal one if used gently). If you remove the wheels to be safe, then use a bit dish washing detergent and rinse well with hot water ...


3

As others have mentioned and you've discovered, the safest way to clean it is to simply follow the manufacturer's instructions. That said... My girlfriend and I both have Camelbaks. Their website says: "DO NOT wash your pack in a washing machine." I've done this with both our bags a whole lot of times and have never had a problem. I've also put a bunch of ...


3

Here's what I found from Dakine (brand I have), guess I should've trusted Google first! DAKINE Pack Washing Instructions We recommend washing your DAKINE backpack by hand in cold water with a mild detergent and soft bristled brush. If hand washing is not going to do the trick, the second option is to use a "front loader" washing machine. This is ...


2

A good recipe for a cheap, simple homemade degreaser is water + borax + washing (laundry) powder, mixed in the ratio 12:4:1. Keep it in a jar as spray bottles can get clogged (but might be worth a try for ease of application). It works on my bike. Some soaking and/or scrubbing with an old toothbrush is required for stubborn muck and grease, for example: ...


2

I would clean the derailleur but also replace the shifter cables and housing. In my experience, it is much more likely for the cables to be a little bit stuck than the actual derailleur itself.


2

Try Dawn Dish soap its a little bit of scrubbing but it seems to work the best, its chem resistant so everything I have tried only makes it more sticky but dish soap hot water and work gets rid of it the best. Good Luck


2

By "gears" I assume you're talking about the rear sprockets, or perhaps the smallest front sprocket, since they're about the only "gears" that are made of steel. And they shouldn't get rusty if properly oiled. A little rust won't hurt the sprockets. Just oil the chain with good chain oil and it will transfer to the sprockets fairly readily -- the rust ...


1

Start by replacing the insoles. Typically this is what smells the most in old bike shoes. After that you can also clean the shoe itself following any one of the many suggested methods outlined in this thread. But be sure to remove you nice new insoles first before cleaning the shoe itself. Also try to thoroughly dry the shoe as fast as possible, leaving ...


1

Dettol Liquid contains Chloroxylenol. It kills bacteria and provides protection against germs which can cause infection and illness. Dettol kills 99.9% of bacteria, such as E.coli and Influenza virus (H1N1). Always read the label. Serious, the smell is caused by bacteria and your mission is to kill them! Put hot water, plenty of Dettol and your ...


1

If there was not too much mud that day, spraying the brakes and drivetrain with the water bottle, then, once indoors, re-greasing the chain, should be enough (otherwise it rusts). Now if things are more messy, a rag and the shower portable head, set to maximum pressure, should do it. I use cold water, to save electricity.


1

I clean my bike in the winter almost the same way as in the summer. I usually just use water (add a little soap if it is really dirty) and a brush or cloth to agitate the dirt. In the winter this is going to suck no matter what you do, unless you bring your bike indoors. The key thing that I find when washing my bike (in the summer or winter), is the ...


1

I would recommend an all-purpose cleaner like GooGone or Oops, but try it on a small spot first as it may remove the finish on whatever you're cleaning. Other than that, you can use a more abrasive cleaning utensil (pad, brush, towel, etc.) to scrape the congealed teflon off.


1

Wash it with mild soap and water. Use an old toothbrush to clean and low pressure water to rinse. Put in the sun to dry. There are very few things on bikes that will actually rust any more. As long as you avoid high pressure sprays[1] and make sure its' dry before you store it, there's almost nothing on the bike that will be affected by soap and water. ...


1

I had exactly the same problem last year due to running into snowy roads for a week or two. The front derailleur clutch jammed. DO the following: Put your gears to 1:1 position. This is the safest position to start with the optimum cable tension. Also, you will have less chances of messing things up. loosen the joint that is holding the derailleur cable ...


1

Here is an unpopular answer. Use clothes from second-hand. They wear out more quickly. Also, don't protect your clothes - sit on the grass, don't care about chain oil on the trousers. Purchase a clothes marker and draw on your t-shirts, if you don't like it, throw it away. This generates rags at sufficient speeds to support a couple of mountain bikes. ...


1

Salt is bad, but please mind that washing salt off with a waterhose is also bad. Rain doesn't get into your bearings and chain, while water from a waterhose sometimes does get in nasty places. Remove salt with some cleaner and some old cloth. Grease your chain again with thin oil. And grease all metal parts (bolts and stuff) with some thick grease such as ...



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