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7

I would avoid doing this. If the Teflon lube has any kind of solvent in it (which it probably does to carry the Teflon), it will break down the grease in the bottom bracket. Eventually, the grease will thin out enough that it will flow out of the bottom bracket, and No More Lube=A Very Bad Thing. If you are using a basic cartridge bottom bracket, they are ...


6

Yes. All those tools require is that the chain moves through them. They do require the chain move through in a particular direction so you will probably find that you end up with the handle on the bike side of the chain rather than on the outside, which will be mildly inconvenient. But it beats not being able to clean your chain at all. The question body ...


6

Modern Cyclo-cross bikes typically used bottom brackets with sealed cartridge bearings. No real maintenance required, except to replace when worn out. When cleaning your bike, be careful as high water pressure can force debris past the seals and into cartridge bearings. Once a year replacement is pretty typical for bottom brackets with outboard bearings. ...


6

Your bike has a conventional threaded bottom bracket (square taper). Since its a relatively new bike, it shipped with a sealed (*) bottom bracket. So, the only maintenance that can be done is tightening the bottom bracket cups (which hold the bottom bracket in place) and replacing the bottom bracket itself (which is a sealed unit containing the bearings, ...


4

For most things, you can just wipe the bike down with a wet towel or sponge and it will be about as green as you can get and adequate (well, as green as you get would be to leave it dirty). Some dish soap and a hose (on shower setting, not jet or super soaker or whatever) if its really dirty. Don't use a pressure washer or something since you might get dirt ...


4

I had one of these. With the exception of the narrow brush (which can be bought seperately), whos curved, toothed end is wonderful for cleaning gunk out of cassettes, I found the tool a waste of money. I wound up throwing mine away. If you're seeing a lot of grime, your problem is almost certainly not the conditions in your area, although this can ...


3

Absolutely it will work. Remember for about half the cycle, your chain is upside down anyway. Some people prefer to use these machines to clean the chain on the bottom (low tension) part and others prefer to be above the chainstay on the high tension part. Personally I think low tension makes more sense, because it allows the cleaning fluid to get in and ...


3

The salt from excessive sweating will corrode your headset bolts, bottle cage bolts, can corrode aluminum alloy in handlebars and can affect the paint on your frame. Riding outside on the road is less of an issue because sweat evaporates more easily and the force of the air rushing by keeps the sweat from settling easily. However, on a trainer, everything ...


3

Everybody uses water to clean bikes. It should not get rusty from that, especially if you dry it afterwards. If the bike is rusty like you describe then more likely from being exposed to water for much longer times than washing would (used in rain, standing outside all very often). Some parts are more likely to get rusty, chains and cranks for example since ...


2

Clean the bike with warm water and soap. Car soap works great but dish soap is also a good option. Don't be afraid to clean those really greasy and black areas thoroughly. As for the rust on the crank and wheels, this suggests those parts are chromed (one-piece crank, perhaps?) therefore the rust you see is most likely surface rust; a layer of minerals ...


1

To get rid of rust, use steel wool with some sort of acidic solvent. I have actually used vinegar on some rusty components before. My biggest piece of advice for bike maintenance is do a little after every ride. Whether that is wiping the chain free of dust or just taking a cloth to the frame; when you do this, all the small things don't add up and become ...


1

Spokes - a "steelo" or other brand of pot scrub. Use warm soapy water, because the dirt is generally dirt not oils. Its hard to get up in by the hub where the spokes cross - you might find a toothbrush useful. If its a rear wheel, remove the freewheel/cassette first, and for either wheel try to not flood the bearings. Use clean water to rinse. You ...


1

Nope. Bar tape is cheap enough to replace every couple years, and makes the bike look nice. Throw your gloves into the wash periodically with your other riding clothes. Sweat is slighly salty, but its not going to harm metal in a bike or human's lifespan. The oils and grease from mechanical parts is more likely to affect paint than sweat. That said, ...


1

You probably do not know this but baking soda can act as a good deodorizer for the shoes and sometimes even for the feet. - After using your shoes, sprinkle a little bit of baking soda on each one. - Leave on the baking soda on the shoes overnight. - Take off the baking soda from the shoes in the morning especially if it is already going to be used. ...


1

In addition to dish soap and citrus based degreasers there are also alcohol based one like the Finish Line's Speed Bike Degreaser. It does not require water and evaporates after application, thus minimizing your environmental impact. That said I usually the Finish Line product first to remove greasy messes and finish off with soap and water followed by just ...


1

I would not touch the bearings without the correct tools. You may get them apart, and will probably get them back together, but won't be able to adjust them very easily and won't be able to get the lock nut tight. For a novice, with the right tools, the job can be a but fiddly as getting the adjustment right will take a few goes. Without the right tools,a ...



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