Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

This is part comment, part answer, but too long to fit in a comment, so here we go. Personally, I use SPD, and when I ride with a group, everyone else has SPD-SL or LOOK. I'm usually clipped in and across the intersection before they're clipped in. Either I'm just really good at clipping in, or SPD are designed to be easier to get clipped in to. Even the ...


7

Look Keo 2 and Look Keo are Look's current/previous range and they are compatible with each other. Look Delta are Look's earlier range. I'm afraid they are not compatible with Keo's or Keo 2's SPD-SL are Shimano's version of road pedals. These aren't compatible with Look products, (neither therefore are Look products compatible with them). Checking out ...


7

Seems that is the Look Memory Eyelet, where you can attach some kind of tab to help get replacement cleats in the same position. This Keo page seems to have a video on the subject, but I can't view it immediately ...


6

A cobbler (i.e. a shoe repairman) can glue a new layer of sole (e.g a non-slip rubber sole that's suitable for winter) onto a pair of shoes' existing soles: so perhaps ask a cobbler.


6

I'm wondering, if anyone have ever faced with same issue when starts to use cleats. What changes can you suggest trying to alleviate the problems I have described? After I first started using cleats, I started to developed knee pain. I asked about that here: you may like some of the answers. I discovered that in my case, the cause was the placement of ...


5

Firstly the "uncomfortable feeling in my knees" needs to be addressed and are a concern. You don't say how much and how long your rides are, but its warning that should not be ignored, more so if your rides are short (under about 2 hours). What cadence are you riding at. With knee discomfort and being used to pedals in the middle of the feet, my guess is ...


5

You can get special covers for your cleats that make it easier to walk and extend their useful life. http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B000UDBLQO


5

Of course the more the cleat interacts with other surfaces, the more it wears. My experience with SPD-SL cleats is the "primary unclipping foot" wears down a bit quicker, although I usually replace both at the same time (partly for convenience, plus I find the yellow "walking grips" wearing out more evenly, so are worth replacing as a pair) Similarly, the ...


5

They sell cleat covers you can use to protect the cleats, and the floors you walk on. Most of them are for SPD-SL but (i think) the ones I linked to are for SPD.


4

To directly answer your question, yes, the Crank Bros Premium Cleat is the one you want. Per their webiste - compatibility: eggbeater, candy, smarty, acid, mallet ( http://www.crankbrothers.com/accessories_premium_cleat.php ) Some good FAQ on these from Crank Bros: http://www.crankbrothers.com/support/faq_candy.php


4

I've had a similar question in mind for a while. I have yet to try this, but my thought is to install new cleats, then fill the bolt holes with shoe-goo or something similar to prevent the issue. It's pretty soft, so you may have to re-apply often, but it would be easier than removing destroyed bolts! I am going to try this next time I install new cleats!


3

I feel fastest with clipless pedals. But you are not alone. http://www.pinkbike.com/news/Which-Muscles-are-Really-Used-During-the-Pedal-Stroke-2012.html I prefer to ride with older style strap in pedals because I like to walk normally when I get somewhere. Also your shoes may not be adjusted to your pedals properly.


3

Cleats are the bottom attachment to shoes. Most road shoes use a 3 hole attachment, which is a standard size. Most pedal manufacturers have their own cleat style, but all 3-hole cleats use the same spacing as far as I know. Your pedals may come with suitable cleats if you're buying them new, if not make sure you buy 'look keo' compatible cleats. There is ...


3

In my experience, my knee pain was always fixed by sliding forward the seat (this kind of alignment). In general, I would check your setup with someone experienced and reliable because there might be a lot of variables involved in this kind of aches. I think most of the problems you're having are due to being used to pedaling with the arch of the foot. Your ...


3

Try a pipe nipple extractor or similar stripped screw extractor (Example: http://www.plumbingsupply.com/extractors.html). It is designed to grip the inside sides of a pipe using the same turning direction that will unscrew it. It shouldn't need much depth to work and it will try to drill itself in. You may still have to drill some of the junk out, but go ...


3

I see from your other question that they're Look Keos. As they're plastic, they're going to ware quicker than a metal cleat, and yes, you could swap them around. However, I think a better strategy might well be to replace them one at a time as they wear out. Plastic stuff doesn't really like being repeatably removed and reattached in most situations and ...


2

I have similar problems as you describe, but mine come from dirt, mud, and other things that get caught in while doing MTB. Aside from that, the Shimano SPD pedals develop some sort of a lip as they wear out, in the side "ramps" that rise the cleat when you twist the foot sideways. It happens in similar fashion as if you repeatedly hit the end of a metal ...


2

To my knowledge, there's no time frame that's given as a guideline. I would think that the reason for that is that there are too many rider-specific factors that contribute to their wear, or lack thereof. I've always heard that they should be changed when they're either hard to engage, won't stay engaged, or hard to disengage. Under that criteria, it sounds ...


2

I think the key to your problem is the asymmetrical nature of SPD-SL pedals. So I don't think the Look pedals will help you. Look at symmetrical pedals, such SpeedPlay, Crank Brothers Egg Beaters, SPDs and the Time Atac range. This style of pedal is much easier to clip into because you can just mash your foot at the pedal. Have a look at this answer for ...


2

As Kibbee said, making your own out of a milk jug or soda/beer can is probably the easiest way to go. The spacer doesn't need to have the exact same footprint as the cleat to work, so you don't need to be too concerned with the sizing/shape.


2

There likely isn't much difference in performance. Some people do find that SPD cleats lead to "hot spots" (painful spots) on the balls of the feet; that's why I went to SPD-SLs. You might find a difference in platform height; IIRC the height of the SPD cleats + pedals is shorter than the SPD-SL. You'd want to adjust your seat height to deal with that.


2

TL;DR : Having a quality pedal means that it will always be in the same position when you need to clip in and will make you life much easier when starting. Part of the problem might be the "cheapness" of the pedals, let me explain : I ride look and have been using Look Keo Carbon pedals, they are middle range (more expensive than the Easy and less than ...


1

For how often did you ride during this month? You describe quite novice errors. I've done the switch recently and I understand what you mean, but each time I was scared to do something with cleats or fell, I beared in mind the thought that I simply need to get used to them. Now I prefer cleats to flats, even I don't feel that 100% confident with them. ...


1

I tried with bathroom sealant (supposed to be white, but dried clear/grey). After a couple of months cycling in all weathers it's still in there. Seems like a cheap and easy solution. Shown below in the right hex-bolt only. I'll now be adding this to the other bolts too. (Some credit should go to Darren Cope who suggested something very similar).


1

I've used the edge of a blunt'ish steak knife in the past and it has worked a treat. The tip fits perfectly down inside the bolt, pick out dirt and grit then return to cutlery draw for future use!


1

It's going to be highly variable. If it is always the same foot that you use to unclip, then it may be as simple as being dragged/scraped on the ground at stops. Also, as has been pointed out, the more you use a specific cleat the more that it will wear. Another thing that could be contributing is leg length and improper fit. If your leg does not track ...


1

Maybe it is neither! Could it not be the moment you hit the ground with your foot which, even when doing it gently, is more of an actual hit than just standing peacefully. I would think that clipping in does some wear and it also removes the micro-bits of cleat the standing and hitting has filed down. What kind of cleats do you use? and more important, ...


1

Ebay - if you can figure out the thread size, it's often the best/cheapest way for small quantities of stainless bolts.


1

I usually ask my LBS when I need spare parts like that. You might have to pay them a buck or two, but a lot of places keep a small stash of parts like that. If that doesn't work, they might be able to order the part directly from Shimano (or ask your friends).


1

I wear Chrome shoes as well, but only have the regular Midways. Chrome, although their shoes are less than satisfactory (for me), have excellent customer service, and I mean EXCELLENT. If you have some sort of defect on your shoe, take it into one of their shops, and they'll replace it for you. (Within the 1 year warranty) Mine was splitting on the sides ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible