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24

The Pedaling Technique of Elite Endurance Cyclists: Changes With Increasing Workload at Constant Cadence was published in the International Journal of Sport Biometrics 7:29-53, 1991. However, it seems to come to the conclusion that they don't really make any difference as far as pedaling efficiency goes. "...while torque during the upstroke did reduce the ...


23

Pedal Selection Pick a system that will work well for your current and future use. It's annoying to have different shoes for different bikes. My experience is limited to Shimano SPDs and Crank Brothers systems -- both of these work very well for road and mountain biking. The shoe cleat is similar for both systems and is fairly small, which means you can ...


21

It has to do with the difference between pedals with toe clips and clipless pedals. Pedals with Toe Clips Clipless Pedals (and shoes) The clipless shoes are for the clipless pedals. The wikipedia page says the following: Clipless refers to the lack of an external toe clip, but not to be confused with platform pedals without toe clips.


21

Terminology is important here. Pedal Clips (refer here) are straps that tighten around the shoe. Clipless, such as SPD have a cleat - refer here Toe clips are not common these days - but still used by some (touring and fixed hub bikes) more niche applications. I assume you are talking about SPD style clipless pedals, but the following discussion does not ...


17

I ride both SS/FG and approach climbing hills much of the same way I would if I were on a geared bike with one very big exception...MOMENTUM. When on a heavily geared SS/FG I gain as much speed as possible going into the hill and push hard to maintain it throughout the climb. Basic climbing tips: Slide back on saddle and drive heels through the bottom of ...


14

First let's clarify the difference between "clipless" and "clip" pedals. They are confusing terms as both have clips. Clip pedals (which I prefer to call cages) look like this: Cages have the advantage that they can be used with normal shoes. To get your foot into them you push it in from the rear and (optionally) reach down and tighten the strap. In my ...


13

@GuyZee covers most of the technique side, but I'd like to add that if you're experiencing difficulty climbing hills, you should also use a lower gear. Faster cadences are a great way to build up your endurance and help with the hill climbs to boot. Spinning is winning!


13

The case for/against clipless, or even straps, is sort of summed up in this piece from the Rivendell Bicycles website. They mention studies, albeit without citing the exact source, that actually pulling up on the pedal is extremely unlikely, except maybe on short uphill or sprint bursts, and so being attached to the pedal is far from being a must. And they ...


12

A technique which may help you get a more efficient pedaling stroke is an exercise called isolated leg. With your bicycle on a trainer or on a slight uphill, unclip your left leg and pedal using only your right leg for 30-60 strokes. Then switch and do the same for your other leg. This exercise will give a very natural feel to how your legs should be ...


11

There are pedals that have a cleat clip on one side and a traditional platform pedal on the other side. You could attach the clip to the platform side and use the cleat side when you're riding with cycling shoes. You might have problems when you're clipped in because the toe clip might hang too low and catch the road when you're leaning into corners.


11

The rule of thumb of "the highest possible without wobbling the hips down to reach for pedals" seems like a better rule than "having the barefoot heel just touch the pedal with the leg completely straight when the pedal is completely down". If your saddle is at the right height, it should be difficult to place a foot on the ground while seated. Now that ...


10

I've been using Shimano A530 pedals for that purpose. Mountain SPD-compatible clip on one side, with a nice wide flat platform on the other. I've also used the old Shimano M324 pedals, but prefer the slightly lighter weight and lower profile of the A530s. Note that other foot retention systems, such as PowerGrips and the like, will work with all shoes ...


9

Q1: No, "float" is the amount your feet can rotate (around a vertical axis) while clipped in. A system/cleat with little or no float keeps your foot in a very rigid position. You can't freely twist your toe/heel while pedaling. If you have a textbook pedal stroke, low float will keep your feet in the right place so you can focus on other things. With ...


9

Your best option is to practice a lot on how to unclip your foot, so you get accustomed to it. I suppose you have already done this. So you must now adjust the spring tension on your pedals. Refer to the instruction manual on how to adjust it. Aside from that, I have found that dirt, grime and other pollution in the cleats makes it extra hard to get the ...


9

Sidi make a wide fitting version of their shoes. I have a pair of Sidi's and they have been the best fitting, most comfortable shoes I've ever found. From their website: Mega sizes are cut with more material throughout, and a larger-volume heelcup. Mega sizes roughly correspond to a EE/EEE width on the Brannock sizing scale. Possibly still not wide ...


9

Clipless pedals let you pull up a bit and road shoes are rigid-ish, so you can get some more power from each turn (of course, you're using your muscles in a bit of a different way). This also gives a bit of a different pressure distribution than platform pedals (look at the layout of say, a Look pedal versus a platform pedal). In an off road situation, they ...


9

I taught my daughter to use clipless pedals by putting her bike on a wind trainer while she watched television. I got her pedals that are flat on one side with SPD's on the other side. A random intervals I'd call "left foot down", or "right foot down", trying to time my call for the most inconvenient moment. And as I mentioned in comments, I never did tell ...


8

There are differences of opinion regarding what you are asking here. Some people are insistent that a road bike has to have proper road pedals, others think that for non-competitive riding over short distances the mountain bike style pedal is just fine, so long as you don't go all day in them and expect to win the Tour de France in them. Let's look at the ...


8

Yes, all SPD pedals are compatible with both of these cleats. The multi-directional release SH-56 will allow you to pull out of the pedal vertically if it is required. They are designed for spin bikes. (Exercise use.) The difference is a preference only, because it depends what you intend to use them for. I will not use the SH-56 on the road because I have ...


8

This is part comment, part answer, but too long to fit in a comment, so here we go. Personally, I use SPD, and when I ride with a group, everyone else has SPD-SL or LOOK. I'm usually clipped in and across the intersection before they're clipped in. Either I'm just really good at clipping in, or SPD are designed to be easier to get clipped in to. Even the ...


7

Two guidelines: If you're unclipping unexpectedly (happens most often when pulling up) then increase the tension. That means turning the adjustment bolt clockwise to increase the spring tension. If you're having trouble clipping in/out then loosen the tension until you can easily clip in/out when you need to. Turn the adjustment bolt counter-clockwise to ...


7

Track standing at intersections is more about showing off than about being quick off the stop line. By the time you can track stand consistently (btw, you can learn to do this on a freewheel bike, too), you will have mastered clipless pedals and you'll be able to clip and unclip very quickly. Other than that, riding fixed vs. SS is a matter of taste. Do you ...


7

Re: Float Typically, manufacturers will supply this information in their description of the pedals, and retailers will mention it as well. I've used clipless pedals since 1990 or so, far longer than I ever used toe-clips. I've used systems like LOOK (which Shimano has co-opted) which have a larger cleat, but I recently switched systems. I switched to ...


7

Stay clipped in at all times, especially during tricky spots because that is when you need the most control and the most power. When you say that 'you're able to bail when you know you're going to crash', you are describing a situation that has the luxury of time to decide. You would have time to unclip too. Whatever happens it is OK to wipe out while ...


7

Seems that is the Look Memory Eyelet, where you can attach some kind of tab to help get replacement cleats in the same position. This Keo page seems to have a video on the subject, but I can't view it immediately ...


7

The "rule of thumb" (which as you stated is slightly different from the one I know) is only that. The geometry of the shoe and pedal can easily make a half inch to an inch of difference from one pedal/shoe combo to the next. (I learned you place the heels of your SHOES on the pedal and pedal backwards to check seat height -- the legs should go fully ...


7

You ask about danger, when/where to use, and when/where not to use, so...: There's the danger that you forget to unclip when you stop, and fall to your side. This is a real danger, but not a serious one except if your fitness is a bit low (risk of wrist, shoulder, hip or ankle lesion). You should then practice a lot first, both clip and unclip while riding ...


7

I just leave a pair of shoes at the office and change shoes when I get there so I don't have to take them back and forth. It's amazing how much space shoes take up in a backpack/pannier. I think that even the "walkable" shoes aren't that comfortable to be in all day. And any cycling shoes that you did want to walk around in all day would lose a lot of the ...


6

My first piece of advice to you would be - "be prepared to fall, because you will". I remember the first time I used clipless pedals. I finished a ride, got back to the house, went to put the feet on the floor. JAMMED! Panicked, slowly fell to the side. But don't worry, you'll soon get used to it. I definitely wouldn't go back to toe straps now.


6

The "neutral" position places the ball of your foot over the pedal spindle, which I assume is where you're at. Conventional wisdom has it that sprinters and high-cadence riders will want the cleat positioned a little forward of that, LSD riders a little aft of that. But as with most positioning questions, the right answer is "whatever works for you."



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