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Most of the answers agree that there is no one definitive leg that should be used, and that the rider should be able to clip and unclip starting with any leg. Suggesting an informal test for the bike: Ask the new trainee to simply make several starts and stops with regular (non cleated) shoes, and notice wich foot is preferred in the pedal and which on the ...


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I've been riding clipless for a bit over 2 years. Right leg dominant, I unclip right, push off with my right, but I am currently contemplating a switch to the left. Once or twice, while riding with a pannier bag on the right side of my rack, I've knocked the bag off the rack. Been reasoning that if I were to unclip left, and leave my right foot clipped in ...


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Could always teach her to track stand. It's a very useful skill, especially if you learn to do it with either foot forward. That sort of bike control will save her at some point when unclipping isn't practical or a quick enough solution for an awkward situation. Best time to learn such skills is when they are young. Have flat bed pedals to start with, just ...


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I'm in the UK, so obviously drive on the left-hand side. In general, I'll unclip with my left foot (I'm right-dominant), because then, when I pull over to the side of the road, I can put my left (outside) foot on the curb/grass/similar. That said, however, I do sometimes unclip with my right, for example if on a camber. Further to my reasoning is this: my ...


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I put my left foot down when I'm stopped (at traffic lights etc.) - this is mainly because I can put my foot on the kerb which is higher than the usual road surface. I also live where they drive on the left-hand-side of the road (UK) - people in countries where they drive on the right may find the right foot to be better. As people have said though, it's a ...


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One thing that I've noticed is that I tend to put my stronger (right) leg down. This leaves the weaker left leg to give the initial stroke. I'm (eventually) going to try to train myself to put my left leg down so that the stronger leg is making the stroke.


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I taught my daughter to use clipless pedals by putting her bike on a wind trainer while she watched television. I got her pedals that are flat on one side with SPD's on the other side. A random intervals I'd call "left foot down", or "right foot down", trying to time my call for the most inconvenient moment. And as I mentioned in comments, I never did tell ...


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There isn't really a difference that matters. Whatever she finds most comfortable (typically, clipping out with the less dominant leg) is what she should use. I find myself clipping out my right leg even though it is dominant in some cases so I can put one foot on the curb in some cases when riding with clipless pedals. The key thing is to practice ...


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Most pedal/crank combinations use one size of spindle and thread. There are a few random oddballs, but it's not incredibly likely that you have one of those. You do have to be careful though as one of those oddballs is very close to the standard size, and you can ruin your cranks if you try to force it. As Blam suggests, your best bet is to take it to a bike ...


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I would just pull one pedal off each bike and go to a bike shop. Go with the right pedal as the threads are normal. I seriously doubt either has odd threads that you cannot find clip pedals. You would just get compatible (or same) pedals for each bike. Pick a pair of shoes that walks OK. A mountain shoe is going to walk better so you should get ...



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