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While there are jeans specifically for cycling (see Tom77's answer), they are still a compromise (and can be expensive). I found the best option for longer rides (> 2 km or so) is to change trousers. That way you can wear bike trousers when biking, and nice trousers when you want to look nice. This also avoids problems when you get dirty or wet during the ...


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I'm surprised noone's mentioned slipperiness. I wear an elastic knee brace because my knees are the first thing to complain on a long ride. I wear the brace over my tights for comfort. The repeated action of peddling slowly works them down, so after a couple of hours the brace is around the top of the calf muscle and my knee is complaining. So your ...


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My instant reaction to this is the Deerstalker. Paired with an appropriate cravat this should be able to carry you through the majority of social functions. Tweed being an obvious material for the outdoors. Depending on how formal you need to go, you might consider a collapsible top hat, which can be changed into on arrival. Finally, if feeling quirky, a ...


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Trying not to mention what has already been said but: Gloves that wick well will also help to keep you cooler (and cut offs are not a significant disadvantage in this sense, due to surface area to volume ratios and blood flow.) The main reasons for choosing cut off gloves as opposed to less protective full finger gloves (given that both can keep you more ...


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I live in Quebec and have a reasonably hilly 8km commute - approx 25 min w/traffic. Winter temps are -5 to -30 for the most part. I wear a snowboarding helmet, goggles if it's really windy or below -15, a tshirt, light marino sweater and a light shell. Regular pants w/waterproof shell pants if it's super sloppy or below -20. Boot covers, five-finger gloves ...


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I find myself in a similar situation when I commute to college on weekends. During sleep you'll get sweaty and our beds are not the most hygienic places in any case so before starting off on your journey, have a shower. If you don't have a shower and you sweat, you'll be combining sweat with dirt etc and this is when body odour will form. In terms of what ...


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Anything colder than -55F (-48C) is difficult to mechanically maintain. Most lubrication products on the market for cold weather are rated to -60F (-51C). Which means that at -50F (-45C) they become almost unrideable and at -55F (-48C) pretty much unrideable. I am aware of products rated for colder than that, but they have issues that when stored at room ...



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