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29

There are basically four solutions that do not involve extensive work on your bike: Roll up the pant-leg on the gear-side high enough to stay away from the gears. Wear tight fitting cycling pants that don't flap. Use braces as you have, or clips such as these to keep your flappy pants close enough to your legs. Stuff the pant-leg on the gear side in your ...


17

Leg straps or clips (especially on the chain side) are the way to go. Not only does this keep the pant leg clean, but it prevents the cuff from chafing or hanging up on something. You can improvise with a large rubber band, but the Velcro straps are readily available and very easy to get on/off. When not in use they can be wrapped around your seat post or ...


10

Most ordinary baby wipes will get grease out of clothing if you get to the stain quickly enough - or, at least, get enough of it out that the rest will later wash out. You can also carry spray-n-wash pads or keep them in your desk at work. However, baby wipes are also good for cleaning your hands - handy after changing a flat, or fiddling with a bike chain. ...


9

There is a lot of sense to @Neil Fein's 'get used to it' attitude as, with some garments, you are just not going to get the oil out. 'Prevention is better than cure' definitely applies, but we are past that, aren't we... In the office environment you have tea making facilities, including a sink with some washing up liquid and maybe some disposable ...


8

I have found that the top of and old sock over a neatly folded trouser leg works well.Cut the top of the sock long enough to cover your pants with leg fully extended to the top of the sprocket.The plus side is you don't ruin good socks stretching them over your pants.


7

What I have always done, quite successfully, is just tuck my trousers into my socks. This avoids all grease from the chain, and if the worst happened and I did get some grease on my sock this would be hidden under my trousers at work. (And yes, I tuck both trouser legs into my socks to avoid looking too silly, even though the chain is only on one side :-)


7

The fundamental problem with synthetic garments is that some of the fibres (particularly early nylon and current polyester) have spaces within the fibres that are perfect-sized cocoons for growing the bacteria that give rise to body odour. 'Boil wash' the garment to kill the bacteria and you damage the fabric. Cold-wash to look after the fabric and you don't ...


4

Not only are grease stains often permanent, but getting caught in the chain can lead to an accident. Here are some options: Shorter pants. Shorts or knickers will stay out of the way. In the winter, you can wear tights underneath. I love my wool tights so much that I wear them under my jeans during the day and at night as pajamas. They're expensive, ...


3

This product should work, Leg Shield. Covers your pant leg from your ankle to right below your knee. http://www.bikelegstrap.com/


3

In addition to velcro and clips, you can use "slap bracelets." Badge holder lanyards from conventions work well, too (but only the ones with alligator clips). Wrap it once around, put the clip end through the closed end and pull it tight. The clip will hold it tight. (pics later)


3

You can use a belt drive to avoid the problem completly. It needs no grease at all! I do not own one yet, but heard only the best of it and want to test it soon. No, I am not working for or in the company. Actually, it sounds it's not a real option for you, as you would have to open the frame to mount the belt. But I think this belt drive is so promising ...


2

When I was a teenager, the "tight roll" was in style. Nowadays I use it nearly every day to keep my pants out of the chain. It works better than anything else I've ever tried, is totally free, and you don't have to carry anything around with you. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tight_rolled_pants And here's a video about how to do it: ...


2

Simple: Just take two rubber bands and stretch them around the bottom of your pants. Done! :)


2

It sounds like maybe one approach you have taken is to bicycle in shorts and carry your pants as cargo. Even without a changing area it shouldn't be a big deal to slip on a pair of pants between the bike rack and the office. If your concern is winter cold, maybe you can get a pair of cycling tights pants, perhaps with thermal insulation, over which you can ...


2

What I think is the simplest (and one I do myself) is to just roll up your trouser legs. You can see an example of what I mean in this picture http://www.terrybicycles.com/core/media/media.nl?id=5180&c=1243446&h=5020f1edd4fce298758b. The advantages of this method are that your trouser legs won't get greased, it allows your legs to be cooler because ...


2

Get a 8 - 12" piece of velcro, loop side, then adhere a 3" self sticking hook side on the end of the inside. Tuck and wrap. $1.50 cost. I have had mine for 5 years, using it almost daily with no issues.


1

As a long-haired individual, I have a hair tie with me at all times. When I ride with a looser pair of pants, I just put the tie around the bottom of my pant leg. Done. It also helps that I have a city/commuter/urban/hybrid bike that has a plastic piece outside the front gear set: http://archive.raleighusa.com/archive/2011-hybrid/detour-45-11/ Otherwise, ...


1

I've generally used Swarfega (the standard green variety). As well as being great for getting hands clean it works on my jeans before they go into the wash. You just rub it in before you put them into the wash.


1

Ordinary degreaser you can get at Walmart or grocery stores will remove bike chain grease from clothes and car seats.


1

I use the Assos Active Wear cleanser which is a commercial product that does the same as some of the home remedies previously listed. It works for me, and it has the benefit of maintaining the warranty on the Assos Clothing, which is worthwhile, given the extreme cost of the clothing to begin with. Their clothes are guaranteed not to shrink, stretch or ...


1

To eliminate odor, go to a hunting supply place (eg, Cabela's in the US) and buy some of the stuff intended to wash hunters' clothes and get all the human scent out. (You put an ounce or two of the powder in the machine with a small load of clothes and your standard detergent.) This does an outstanding job at eliminating latent body odor.



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