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7

This can be done two ways: Easy way: Purchase a new 700c wheel with coaster brake hub from your Local Bike Shop or the internet. It may be hard to find this as it is not a particularly popular option, but it's not uncommon to find one at a well-appointed bike shop. Hard way: Purchase a new coaster brake hub, and rebuild your existing rear wheel (or have it ...


5

Stopping is relatively easy - the rearmost foot is pressing back/down on the pedal to operate the brake, the other goes on the ground. If you're used to two feet on the ground when stopped you'll need to practice stopping with one foot first. You probably need to swap anyway, so the foot on the pedals is ready to push down when you move off. It's vaguely ...


4

Add a front hand brake is the easiest way. But otherwise, you have to get used to it. You should have 2 independent braking systems anyway in case one fails (and your face doesn't count as one). But you are prone to skidding and ineffective stopping with a coaster brake in general (which is why they're pretty much only on kids bikes now a days, or in some ...


4

What you most likely have is an old-fashioned coaster brake, along with a hand brake. In reality the coaster brake is probably more "natural" for someone learning -- the hand brake is mostly an affectation designed to make the bike appeal more to boys (of all ages). But it is possible to disassemble the rear hub and disable the brake in most cases. There ...


3

Not sure if this is an exact match, but it should get you pretty close: Park Tools: Coaster Brake Hub Overhaul


2

The term "cone nut", on a bike, generally refers to the nuts that comprise the outer half of a bearing race (the inner half being formed into the wheel hub or whatever). The "cone" side, which faces inward, has a concave profile so that the balls will roll smoothly in it. It's hard to tell what you have from your description. I do vaguely recall some ...


2

The ends of the ring often taper, sometimes only one end does. That makes it slightly easier to get a screwdriver under the ring. But doing that often just pushes the ring around. Better to use a pair of pliers to spread the end, then a screwdriver to lift it. It will usually pop off, but the plier hand can usually block it from flying across the room. I've ...


2

Like the other poster said, cleaning it more shouldn't be a huge issue. A nice pro tip is to put some car-wax style treatment on the frame and the non-lubricated parts. I use NuFinish (wouldn't use it on a car, but it works great on bikes...I think "real" waxes might cause dust to stick) which protects all of the parts with an extra layer of wax and causes ...


2

It would take a lot of cleaning to wear away the folding mechanisms on a Dahon. Unless you're cleaning your bike with steel wool and an angle grinder, you have very little to worry about. However, as you likely know, not cleaning your bike can result in excessive wear. The good news is that, since this is a single-speed bike, you have less to clean. While ...


2

You should only need to replace the sprocket, nothing else. If you put on a smaller sprocket to get higher gearing/slower pedalling you need a smaller sprocket, not a larger one. You may need to remove a chain link. Those parts should be standard, the same as on an adult bike, and any bike shop should be able to make the switch. Coaster brakes are common in ...


1

There are many sites on the web for calculating spoke lengths. Some of them have pre-filled settings for hubs and wheels, http://leonard.io/edd/ others ask for exact dimensions. The old adage of measure twice and cut once applies here so I would say go for at least 3 sites and check that they tally up! Not forgetting Sheldon Brown's page, ...


1

Since you live in the Hague: There is a good chance these guys have experience with espressowheels. For a more general answer: just go to a bike shop with the hub and rim and they'll be able to help you.


1

Don't forget to make certain the reaction arm is properly and securely fixed to the frame. During mad skidzzzz there will be serious force put on it, so don't take the matter likely. If it comes loose while stopping, not only might it make stopping a challenge, it can destroy the hub bearings.


1

I found a great set of coaster wheels online at espresso wheels dot com. They sell ready made deep V coaster wheels in four colours: white, matt black, polished silver and turquoise for £139. They also do custom wheel builds, sell the rims and hubs separately and ship anywhere in the world.



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