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7

It sounds like the rear wheel shifted in the frame. Look closely at the axle where it connects to the frame at the dropouts, you may be able to see that it shifted. If you have the tools, loosen the nuts holding the rear wheel in place and you'll be able to recenter the wheel in the frame. As you recenter the wheel also pull back on it to keep tension on ...


4

What I'm guessing is happening is that your reaction arm (the thing on the left of the diagram) is not fixed in place. When you brake the shoes of the brake are pushed out from the axle into the shell of the wheel hub. The idea being that the axle is fixed in place and the shoes drag against the shell. If the reaction arm was undone, the friction of the ...


4

Short answer - no, not easily. Kids don't have the hand strength to use handbrakes properly, so a coaster brake is going to function better, once he gets the hang of it. He's activating the brake by peddling backwards. So don't do that. Instead encourage him to push off with pedals level instead of optimal angle. That will discourage the rear brake ...


2

The coaster brake is probably designed so that it can be relatively easily opened to change the brake shoes. One option would be to open it and completely remove the brake shoes, thus disabling it. (Image from http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help/coaster-hub-overhaul-pedal-brake-hub ) Whether this is safe is a good question - usually you'd want two ...


1

Klunker as a term is synonymous with early mountain bike (as it is currently known). Klunkers were developed by customising early beach cruisers on 26" wheels (Schwinn predominantly) by spreading the rear dropouts to make them multi-geared and adding moto handle bars and brakes due to their durability and strength (brands such as Magura were initially moto ...



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