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11

I think these may be what you're looking for. FYI, a lot of this information is available with a little searching. Depending on what exactly you are looking for, you might want to look up a document for a specific cassette as the numbers might be slightly different. Spacer widths (From Shimano tech docs) 8 Spd: 3.00mm 9 Spd: 2.56mm 10 Spd: 2.35mm (1.0mm ...


10

Assuming you have Shimano-compatiple Hyperglide cogs: No, you can't. The cassette body is not symmetric, the cassette fits in only one position. You could resort to adapt the cogs with a file, though. But shifting will be problematic at least, the cogs have certain indents to make shifting smoother.


8

The problem is that any rear cluster designed for indexed shifting has directional cogs. There are ramps embossed on the sides of the cogs to catch the chain pins and lever the chain up to the next larger cog when the chain is shifted. If you somehow reverse the cogs these ramps will be on the wrong side of the cogs and will be running the wrong direction.


8

Here are some points taken from the literature: Mechanical efficiency is usually 88-98% for majority of deraileur systems (when clean,lubricated and new) Drivetrain efficiency decreases with smaller rear cogs, Highest efficiency can be reached at high torques and low cadence, Chainline effects are negligible, imposible to note with measurement apparatus, ...


7

Chains for modern bicycles all have a 1/2" pitch - the distance from roller to roller or from pin to pin. However, multi-speed bicycles have rollers that are 3/32" wide (or narrower), while many single speed drivetrains (fixies, track bikes, BMX) have rollers that are 1/8" wide. Similarly, there are chainrings and cogs which accommodate wider or narrower ...


6

The key property is hardness. For uniform materials (like cogs), hardness directly affects wear resistance. The harder the metal the longer it will last. Some digging around wikipedia suggests that typical Brinell hardness values are: pure aluminium 15HB, 6061-T6 aluminium (heat treated) 95 HB mild steel 120HB, 4130 CroMo steel 183-217 HB (90-96 ...


6

The outer ring looks like a lock ring. This should help you get it off:


6

Tricky one. You will go through several chains before going through a cassette. A worn chain can be measured quite easily with a gauge. Measuring wear on a cassette is more difficult. It is usually the middle set of sprockets which wear first - due to their more frequent use. If examined carefully - you may notice the teeth on them thinning.


6

That's a freehub body. Look on the hub for the model of hub you have, and then you can use that to find the appropriate freehub body model by looking at the documentation of the hub.


5

It is a derailleur pulley, and fairly worn out one at that. The easiest way to find a fitting replacement is to buy a set from an aftermarket manufacturer that comes with adapter shims for different derailleurs. You can simply try different shims until you find the one that fits. They do come in different teeth counts. From the picture it looks like this ...


4

Getting a 7-speed (or indeed any) Campy cassette wouldn't do you much good anyway since the rest of your drivetrain will be Shimano. As you've discovered the two don't mix. (Or rather, they are not supposed to mix and you can expect problems if you do try to mix them. Never say never, I guess!) I reckon your cheapest option could be to visit your LBS and to ...


4

Running 1x9 is a great idea. I have done it with relatively good success. There were always times on big rides i wish i had a granny.I also intially had issues on chain drop. Because the 9 speed rear, bumpy and rocky terrain can knock the chain off when the derailleur would slap. To prevent chain drop on the front, you can run a bash guard, and an N-gear ...


4

"Chain binding" occurs when the chain is really tight around the sprockets. No set of sprockets is perfectly round and centered (especially if worn a bit), and if the chain is tight at one spot in the rotation it likely will become too tight with another half-turn or so. The pressure of the chain on the sprockets makes the crank more difficult to turn, or, ...


4

You need a rear hub that can have a cog on both sides. Some fixed gear hubs have threads on both sides, or a fixed thread on one side and freewheel thread on the other. The author apparently has one of these. The multi-gear option is to use a disc hub and cog that has been drilled to fit 6-bolt disc brake mount. This trick is usually used to make fixed ...


3

If your chain was measured and is worn, then by all means replace it. You are going to cause more wear to your bike using a worn chain than having slightly worn sprockets. A worn chain causes uneven wear on the teeth of your chainrings and cassette cogs, eventually this can cause issues with shifting and 'chain suck'. The new chain you selected looks good....


3

Ah the internet. Answered my own Q: It takes about a minute. Yay! Watch at 2:13: Replace Fixed Cog (broken link) Instead, try How To Change A Track Bike Or Fixie Sprocket (splined). FIXIE COG INSTALL #3 (threaded) For DIY: need a chainwhip and a lockring wrench / lockring spanner ...or a multi-tool with chainwhip & lockring wrench! Done.


3

As the others have said, it's the "jockey wheel" from a rear derailer. If you look at the derailer there will be another, nearly-identical wheel. If you can find a replacement which fits in terms of the bolt holding it in place then you're probably fine -- it's ideal if it's the same diameter, but that's not absolutely necessary, and it's certainly not ...


3

Check your cassette is on properly. The smallest rear sprocket spinning around sounds like it is not on the freehub and spinning freely between the frame and the freehub. There is a lockring on the outermost of the cassette which fastens the cassette to the freehub on the wheel. The cassette has notches machined out of it to match the freehub body and allow ...


2

According to Sheldon Brown's website: New Chainrings, Old Chains Going the other direction, using wider chains with chainrings intended for narrower chains is not generally a major problem if there's only a one- or two- generation difference. The only problem you might run into is that the chain will be more liable to rub on the inside of the bigger ...


2

In the MTB world, it's only XC (and closely related) disciplines that run a triple ring. Just take off the rings you don't want anymore and buy a chain device. If you only really do XC, then there is no need a buy a burly DH chain device with a bash guard, you just need one that has two rollers to squeeze the chain - as it joins and leaves the front ring.


2

I would certainly give a lot of attention to the chainring and lockring. One question that I think you need to answer is whether the lockring was loose before the incident or did the chain jamming the cog cause the lockring to come adrift. Then you need to consider whether the lockring loosened naturally, i.e. did it turn along the thread, or was it forced ...


2

Just about any new bike you ever purchase will need a good tune up after the first 100 miles, not unlike a lot of cars or motorcycles. It's perfectly normal for most of the parts, especially parts under tension like brakes and cables, to settle and loosen a bit the first few times you ride the bike. It's likely that the cable for the rear shifter has ...


2

There are tools for measuring cassette wear. http://www.rohloff.de/en/products/hg_check/ And of course there is visual inspection and also how it rides / indexes, particularly under heavy load (when it will usually slip if worn).


2

I would not call it convention but rather a reasoned design choice: most people are right-handed and one shifts the rear gears more frequently, therefore right shifts rear. This is the same worldwide for all integrated shifters, which integrate the brake and shift mechanics. Brakes however are often reversed in countries, like the UK, where traffic runs on ...


2

When you replace the cluster (rear cogs) you almost always need to replace the chain too because they wear together. If you put an old chain on a new cluster, you often experience that kind of because the length* of the links in the chain is slightly longer than the spaces between the teeth on a new cluster. *Note the links don't actually get longer, it's ...


2

As usual Sheldon Brown has the answer, in his glossary of all places: Fixed-gear hubs use a left (reverse) threaded lock ring to keep the sprocket from unscrewing when the cyclist resists the motion of the pedals. Fixed-Gear (Track) Hub Lockring Threading (Left-hand thread): English/ISO 1.29" x 24 TPI Campagnolo/Phil Wood 1....


2

This could conceivably be a cross-chain issue. Hypothesis: when the chain is on the second cog, it extends toward the chain ring at such an angle that there is interference from the teeth of the larger, third cog. This kind of thing can't be diagnosed remotely without detailed pictures at suitable angles showing the chain line, derailleur and cassette ...


1

You can replace the smallest cogs on cassette. For example see Sheldon Brown's Building custom cassette page. For example, Shimano doesn't make any true "corncob" (one-tooth-jump) cassettes for time-trialists or flatland riders. In 7 speed, the closest is the J (13/14/15/16/17/19/21). If you remove the 21-tooth sprocket from a J, you can make it ...


1

I went through a similar exercise this summer. Maybe my experience can be helpful. I have 15 year old Mountain bike with XTR components all around. My 6 year old chain starting to bind in a couple of links so I decided to change it out. I did not buy a Shimano chain but used a KMC 8 speed chain from LBS. I made the mistake of throwing out the old chain. ...



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