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25

I use a sort of wave, raising my hand but with no movement in it (so not a 'Hey buddy' or 'I need help' side to side movement).... it works on my bicycle, on my motorcycle, and while driving a vehicle. It's got somewhat of a dual purpose: acknowledgement that I did something wrong, and/or 'thanks for letting me in' gratitude gesture. The motorcycle I find a ...


19

18km a day is not far, as long as you have an OK fitness level to start with and no health issues, it is certainly achievable, but... You will not get any rest days. I was once told, you do not get fit exercising, you get fit recovering. If you ride 5 days a week, there's no recovery time. This could lead to problems since each day's effort is stressing ...


9

Yeah, I would suggest that you not start out doing this daily, but do it every 2nd or 3rd day for a couple of weeks, taking care to take an extra rest day when needed. You will find that some days you are eager to get started riding and others your stomach churns at the thought, and you can kind of use that to adjust your frequency. After about 2 weeks, ...


8

For a short commute in street clothes I opted for flat bars with bar end extentions. This allows some different hand positions and for me a more comfortable upright position. If you are riding for the first time is several years, bike fit is more critical than bar type. A bike that is the wrong size will never be comfortable no matter what type bar it has.


7

I love a good drop bar, but if you're only going 4 miles, an upright position might be more comfortable for you, especially if you're starting to commute for the first time. Start with your basic commuter bike if you want, something that looks like this, with some flat handle bars. http://s7d4.scene7.com/is/image/TrekBicycleProducts/52049 Head to a bike ...


6

One minor point: In the US you hardly ever find 5/10/15 speed bikes, except perhaps at WalMart. Generally there will be from seven to 10 cogs on the rear. Re the "right" gearing, it depends on the terrain, but if it's at all hilly where you live and you'll be pulling a trailer, and you're not a gorilla, you need some low gearing to get the trailer up ...


6

Will mounting a camera on the handlebar instead of the helmet make the picture more shaky? Yes. The helmet mount provides the most stable video because any terrain roughness has already been absorbed by your body. In addition to shakeness the handlebars mount will provide a not so pleasant video because it will constantly be panning left and right due ...


6

Yes, I say it's perfectly possible. In fact I've done something similar twice in my life. 1 - At 28 I decided to start cycling to work. I rode for leisure occasionally but this was a big change. The commute was about 14 km each way and generally uphill on the way to work in the morning and downhill on the way home. The difference in altitude between start ...


5

Unfortunately, there is no single answer to this question. In my experience, every route is unique, and will have variables that increase or decrease the transit time for a particular commute. Traffic, seasonal weather, time of day for the commute, rider's fitness, and your bicycle's condition will all play a role in determining the time for a given route. ...


5

First of all, to reinforce what Daniel pointed out, do NOT approach such an obstacle at an angle unless you want to eat pavement. Hit step ups, step downs, and especially railroad tracks as perpendicularly as possible. If it's a right turn you're taking, assuming you're in a country that drives on the right side of the street, signal, take the lane, and take ...


5

There are two main things to consider: What will be the largest (heaviest, faster) gear, and what will be your smallest (lightest, slower) gear, one for cruise speed and other for steep hills. It matters to know WHAT these gears will be, as they determine your maximum cruise speed and the maximum steepness you'll climb. Since you plan to ride with your ...


5

I wave if I can but sometimes that's not possible because I'm controlling the bike. I always give them a look of apology and say "sorry" even though they can't hear me. I slightly exaggerate the look and the lip movements so that I can be sure that they see it. And most people can read lips well enough to pick up "sorry" even across an intersection. I ...


4

In Hawaii, it's common for drivers (and cyclists, I suppose) to use the shaka to communicate an apology on the road: To folks who know about it, the sign carries the same range of positive meanings as Aloha and should be taken as a friendly gesture. While it doesn't specifically communicate apology, the sign is used as a relaxed greeting, which could ...


4

Cameras on bikes are a trade-off. I run my camera from the handlebars, but it can be very shaky particularly depending on the road surface: on a newly paved road it can be almost perfect, but on cobbles it's almost useless. Certainly you can helmet mount, but then you can look quite silly. (The cuboid Go Pros on top of a helmet just look ridiculous.) There ...


3

More shaky: yes. I run a fairly cheap "kaiser baas" camera mounted on my handlebars. It took a bit of work to get a stable video - after some experiments I put a layer of rubber around the handlebars (very large rubber bands) then tightened the mounting as much as possible. The result is acceptable for me. Certainly big potholes and very rough sections ...


3

Which pants do you have right now? And did you enjoy that downpour yesterday? There wasn't a dry cyclist in the city, breathable pants or not. Some days we're just going to get wet. Showers pass is made right here in portland, and I use them on all the nasty days, for me they work great ...


3

Short answer - there's no widely recognized hand gesture for I'm sorry. You could try the American Sign Language for sorry: I'm not sure how likely it is that this will be understood by the other person though.


3

This is a really good question, and one that I found myself asking only a few weeks ago. The aforementioned posts are great if you feel like restricting yourself to "Goretex" as the main construction fabric of the jacket you're looking for. You can find a lot of technical information about Goretex online, but one of the most basic facts about the fabric is ...


3

There are other brands and fabrics, I've used a few eVent is very similar to GoreTex. Wind stopper, waterproof, breathable, my rain pants are made with eVent. I love my clothes and gloves made with WindStopper, a little cheaper, but not waterproof. When I first started commuting by bicycle, I got a Nylon jacket, made with coated nylon and taped seams. It ...


3

You can definitely do it, the points about rest are good ones though. If you are commuting every day, I think it takes a conscious effort to take it easy on most days, and "reward" yourself by letting your body just have at it on others. The second part of that question is how you'll be presentable when you get there? Especially at first, you may sweat a ...


3

I agree with most answers but I think they all assume you will ride in a sporty fashion, but you don't have to, at least not all days. Does a driver race their car everyday on the way to work or school? Commuting is totally different from bike racing or training, you can combine the two, but the purpose of commuting is "getting there on time", you don't ...


2

You're right on the money in terms of commuting upgrades. Buying used bikes is a great way to go about acquiring a ride, but sometimes bikes need a bit of refitting for commuting. I took a look at the 1981 Miyata Catalog. Models from year to year are generally similar, so this should be accurate for most late 70s early 80s 912s. This bike is described as a ...


2

Get a Rain Cape (basically a poncho) if you want to keep drier on the legs without overheating as much. The design diverts water away from your legs and has more ventilation than a standard jacket since it has the open bottom. If you've got fenders to keep the splashing to a minimum, a rain cape, and cheap water resistant pants (for days with heavy rain), ...


2

According to my experience, the gore-tex promise, i.e. breathable and dry is a myth*. The combination you are looking for might become available if you're using so-called "rainlegs" http://www.kurbelix.com/products/Fahrradbekleidung/Rainlegs-Regenschutz-Sportlich-Grau.html?cat=165795&pa_option=871 in combination with whatever you consider "soft shell ...


2

Something that has not been mentioned here is the two ends. One can easily spend 45 minutes on each end of a 60 minute ride, gathering stuff together before the ride and cleaning up after. If you're going to commute regularly it's important to have this stuff "fine-tuned". You want to have all your gear ready to go (prepared the night before, if possible) ...


2

One could possibly look up the route on Strava. They break things up into segments so it might take some work to figure out your whole route. Also remember that most people on Strava are trying for best times and not commuting. However it still might offer a good starting point.


1

On Trek 4300 you have RST Gila fork which is cheap and simple. You can't really lock it completely, just pre-load the spring to maximum. I'd say you should not worry about it - the internals are very simple and can't really be damaged easily: this is no oil/air fork. It has a steel spring and some rubbers to work as dumper. And most likely the juddering you ...


1

I believe I'd opt for the drop bars. They give you several different positions; on the drops, on the brake hoods and on the top of the bars. The top of the bars position is fairly close to and upright position like you'd see with regular handlebars. I immediately thought of the hills and winds you can run into in San Francisco! There may be times when a more ...


1

If you are "not worried about getting wet when it is super rainy" I would suggest to skip rain pants completely. Ride with good fenders in normal cycling clothes you would use at the same (or slightly lower) temperatures if it was dry. For me that often means tights with woolen, thin knee warmers. Change into civilian clothes at work. I have yet to find one ...



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