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28

I use a sort of wave, raising my hand but with no movement in it (so not a 'Hey buddy' or 'I need help' side to side movement).... it works on my bicycle, on my motorcycle, and while driving a vehicle. It's got somewhat of a dual purpose: acknowledgement that I did something wrong, and/or 'thanks for letting me in' gratitude gesture. The motorcycle I find a ...


20

18km a day is not far, as long as you have an OK fitness level to start with and no health issues, it is certainly achievable, but... You will not get any rest days. I was once told, you do not get fit exercising, you get fit recovering. If you ride 5 days a week, there's no recovery time. This could lead to problems since each day's effort is stressing ...


11

Yeah, I would suggest that you not start out doing this daily, but do it every 2nd or 3rd day for a couple of weeks, taking care to take an extra rest day when needed. You will find that some days you are eager to get started riding and others your stomach churns at the thought, and you can kind of use that to adjust your frequency. After about 2 weeks, ...


11

If you have n bikes, n+1 bikes is the right amount of bikes to have. ;) Realistically, I think 2 or 3 is adequate - a cyclocross or non-racing road bike can do the first two tasks (road ride + commute) provided it has rack and fender mounts, and one mountain bike is likely good enough for the trails in one's area (if you go somewhere else where another ...


10

Aside from n+1, the other honest answer is: as many as your spouse will tolerate. I have six (two road bikes, one mtb, two folders, one English cruiser). I have met the spousal tolerance factor. After this, I can only replace, not add. So if I really want that Brompton, one of the folders has to go. Now, your question doesn't also get to another important ...


8

I have seen and used a sheepish wave and a shoulder shrug or head bow, never had someone try to beat me up after that.


8

For a short commute in street clothes I opted for flat bars with bar end extentions. This allows some different hand positions and for me a more comfortable upright position. If you are riding for the first time is several years, bike fit is more critical than bar type. A bike that is the wrong size will never be comfortable no matter what type bar it has.


8

90 miles is roughly 140km, so if you're riding that every day it's about 700km a week. Which puts you in elite rider territory for upright bikes without power assist. It's doable, it's just going to be hard and you'll need to work on nutrition and health as well as fitness. Note that there's also a balance here - if you use world class equipment to get a ...


7

I love a good drop bar, but if you're only going 4 miles, an upright position might be more comfortable for you, especially if you're starting to commute for the first time. Start with your basic commuter bike if you want, something that looks like this, with some flat handle bars. http://s7d4.scene7.com/is/image/TrekBicycleProducts/52049 Head to a bike ...


7

I won't give my own question the check. I have a few bikes and I see a bike I want and I am going through the can I justify to myself. How many is too much? If you don't have room to store them safely and sheltered then too many. If you are not going to maintain them then it is too many. You can't afford it. When do you need more than one bike? ...


6

Will mounting a camera on the handlebar instead of the helmet make the picture more shaky? Yes. The helmet mount provides the most stable video because any terrain roughness has already been absorbed by your body. In addition to shakeness the handlebars mount will provide a not so pleasant video because it will constantly be panning left and right due ...


6

One minor point: In the US you hardly ever find 5/10/15 speed bikes, except perhaps at WalMart. Generally there will be from seven to 10 cogs on the rear. Re the "right" gearing, it depends on the terrain, but if it's at all hilly where you live and you'll be pulling a trailer, and you're not a gorilla, you need some low gearing to get the trailer up ...


6

Yes, I say it's perfectly possible. In fact I've done something similar twice in my life. 1 - At 28 I decided to start cycling to work. I rode for leisure occasionally but this was a big change. The commute was about 14 km each way and generally uphill on the way to work in the morning and downhill on the way home. The difference in altitude between start ...


5

In Hawaii, it's common for drivers (and cyclists, I suppose) to use the shaka to communicate an apology on the road: To folks who know about it, the sign carries the same range of positive meanings as Aloha and should be taken as a friendly gesture. While it doesn't specifically communicate apology, the sign is used as a relaxed greeting, which could ...


5

There are two main things to consider: What will be the largest (heaviest, faster) gear, and what will be your smallest (lightest, slower) gear, one for cruise speed and other for steep hills. It matters to know WHAT these gears will be, as they determine your maximum cruise speed and the maximum steepness you'll climb. Since you plan to ride with your ...


5

Unfortunately, there is no single answer to this question. In my experience, every route is unique, and will have variables that increase or decrease the transit time for a particular commute. Traffic, seasonal weather, time of day for the commute, rider's fitness, and your bicycle's condition will all play a role in determining the time for a given route. ...


5

First of all, to reinforce what Daniel pointed out, do NOT approach such an obstacle at an angle unless you want to eat pavement. Hit step ups, step downs, and especially railroad tracks as perpendicularly as possible. If it's a right turn you're taking, assuming you're in a country that drives on the right side of the street, signal, take the lane, and take ...


5

I wave if I can but sometimes that's not possible because I'm controlling the bike. I always give them a look of apology and say "sorry" even though they can't hear me. I slightly exaggerate the look and the lip movements so that I can be sure that they see it. And most people can read lips well enough to pick up "sorry" even across an intersection. I ...


5

This is a monster question, I'll attempt to address some of it below. I'm sorry if I miss some of your points, but you'll appreciate it is quite difficult to pick them all out. Hopefully you'll find the things I do address vaguely helpful. First of all it is not at all an insane idea, in fact it sounds like a superb idea if one of your goals is fitness. ...


5

Background Starting in the late 90's I have done a lot of long distance commuting over the years. Typically my volume has been about 300-400 km / week, not quite the 700 km/week you are proposing, but a decent amount. This is done on an upright bike with no power assist, in all weather conditions (sun, rain and light snow). In that time I have also done a ...


5

This is quite tricky, given a trombone is not a nicely shaped instrument. You can try some larger racks, or mount some plywood or something to a smaller rack to try to get a more stable surface to carry the trombone (or be able to build something that allowed carrying the trombone like a pannier), but I doubt it will be very good, especially with all the ...


4

Cameras on bikes are a trade-off. I run my camera from the handlebars, but it can be very shaky particularly depending on the road surface: on a newly paved road it can be almost perfect, but on cobbles it's almost useless. Certainly you can helmet mount, but then you can look quite silly. (The cuboid Go Pros on top of a helmet just look ridiculous.) There ...


4

Short answer - there's no widely recognized hand gesture for I'm sorry. You could try the American Sign Language for sorry: I'm not sure how likely it is that this will be understood by the other person though.


3

Which pants do you have right now? And did you enjoy that downpour yesterday? There wasn't a dry cyclist in the city, breathable pants or not. Some days we're just going to get wet. Showers pass is made right here in portland, and I use them on all the nasty days, for me they work great ...


3

This is a really good question, and one that I found myself asking only a few weeks ago. The aforementioned posts are great if you feel like restricting yourself to "Goretex" as the main construction fabric of the jacket you're looking for. You can find a lot of technical information about Goretex online, but one of the most basic facts about the fabric is ...


3

There are other brands and fabrics, I've used a few eVent is very similar to GoreTex. Wind stopper, waterproof, breathable, my rain pants are made with eVent. I love my clothes and gloves made with WindStopper, a little cheaper, but not waterproof. When I first started commuting by bicycle, I got a Nylon jacket, made with coated nylon and taped seams. It ...


3

More shaky: yes. I run a fairly cheap "kaiser baas" camera mounted on my handlebars. It took a bit of work to get a stable video - after some experiments I put a layer of rubber around the handlebars (very large rubber bands) then tightened the mounting as much as possible. The result is acceptable for me. Certainly big potholes and very rough sections ...


3

You can definitely do it, the points about rest are good ones though. If you are commuting every day, I think it takes a conscious effort to take it easy on most days, and "reward" yourself by letting your body just have at it on others. The second part of that question is how you'll be presentable when you get there? Especially at first, you may sweat a ...



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