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I'd say n (or n + 1) where n is the number of riding styles you are currently and actively pursing is reasonable. The +1 formula is optional for people who race fairly seriously. So if you like to ride cross-country mtn occasionally, but seriously race road and commute, I'd say your n was 3 with the +1 option of an additional road bike for racing. I ...


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You might be able to get away with a handlebar bag (Ortlieb has a waterproof one that claims to hold 7l) plus a messenger bag or light backpack, or the underseat stuff sack mentioned by Chris in AK. I agree with commenter Blam that leaving the shoes at work will drastically reduce the needed volume. A porteur rack in front might do the job too, and perhaps ...


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I would really recommend re-looking at a backpack. There are a large variety of packs out there and the drybag styles ones seem to get better every year. I have found that a backpack is a more dynamic way to carry weight. You might look for one with better airflow built into the padding section. I find that if I dress just a little more lightly and have ...


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I used to commute 14 kilometers one way, which makes up 28 both ways to work every day. Needed to get used at first but it did not take much time. A bicycle moves 22 km/h in average in a tight traffic with lights, +-3 km/h if you are lucky or not, which makes some 40 minutes for the whole trip - not a big deal, really. I did not ride in rain and when it is ...


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My commute is exactly the same:18km one way. I have an electric motor 350w that helps a lot, on normal days no shower needed in the morning. I tried all possible side roads until I found a nicer route, even if that is 5km more, I prefer the safer and quieter way.


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It's all relative. I ride 8 km each way to work, and I ride all year in the wet and rainy Pacific Northwest of Washington State. There is a guy at work who rides about 22 km each way, and he too rides all year. My route puts me in traffic most of the way, but Washington State is regarded as the most bike friendly state in the U.S. On your question of ...


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Traffic varies a lot between countries - my guess is that it quite a different thing in India than in Denmark. During the last 20 years many Danish cities have been completely re-designed to better accommodate the many bikes - often by reducing the number or width of the car lanes to make room for dedicated bike lanes. And for a city like Copenhagen, it has ...


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Use a Gig Bag to use as a back pack. Thats what they are there for, and it seems there exist some for trombone with enough extra space for stands and sheets (check before you buy). I use a baritone saxophone gig bag on my bike (this one). While it may look a big oddly proportioned on me (115cm in height; the bag, not me), it works perfectly fine for ...


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This is quite tricky, given a trombone is not a nicely shaped instrument. You can try some larger racks, or mount some plywood or something to a smaller rack to try to get a more stable surface to carry the trombone (or be able to build something that allowed carrying the trombone like a pannier), but I doubt it will be very good, especially with all the ...



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