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1

I used to carry a small acoustic guitar (OO sized) by attaching it like a pannier to the rear rack. The neck of the guitar went straight up. I would think that you could do something similar with a trombone. I can't quite picture a trombone case, but it seems like it might actually fit in a pannier which would make it very easy. Are the stands folding music ...


1

In the Netherlands, and other places, precious cargo is often transported in a 'bakfiets'. This test has photos of several (and a good test in Dutch) so I do not favor one over any other. There are also transporter bikes with enclosed front boxes but those are often just that bit bigger that finding a parking spot is not easy. The traditional bakfiets in ...


0

I have a desk job with little required physical exertion, in an air conditioned environment, and I wear undershirts. Wearing the same clothes for several days in a row for only 8 hours a day isn't a problem in this environment with this work load. So I keep a change of clothes in the office. When I arrive at work I cool down (server room at 65F (18C) ...


0

A lot of people where I'm from who want to dress well and ride a bike to work buy an electric bike with pedal assistance, it lets them ride fast while not exerting so much energy to get sweaty, they are legal to ride in bike lanes as well. I guess you might be hesitant to buy another bike, but there are kits for converting an existing bike to an electrical ...


0

As stated in the accepted answer: roll up your business clothes. Suit and shoes do not need to travel each time, just find some place to hang or fold them in your office. Be sure to take the investment in a water-proof sidebag of high quality. They are surprisingly expensive and surprisingly indispensable. Not having to carry anything on your back gives ...


2

For the sweat: I cycled in the humid midwest USA and would be drenched. I brought a pack of jumbo baby wipes (wet ones big ones, I believe...try to get un-scented). When changing in the restroom, I'd use two or three wipes and it would really get most of the salty muck off of me. Get dressed, slap some product in my hair and I was good to go. I don't ...


7

How much you sweat depends a lot on climate (temperature, wind), route (flat, number of stops) and your body. 7 miles is a fair distance when you haven't done it before (but quite feasible), so perhaps it's a good idea to try the route a few times on the weekend when you're not under pressure. Your colleague who's drenched in sweat is probably doing it for ...


3

If you're riding to work (well done btw) you have three concerns in the office: 1) You don't smell 2) You look professional (appropriate for your job) 3) Your clothes arrive in work in the same state as when they left the wardrobe. I used to commute daily for about 8 miles and here's what I did. Roll your clothes, in a few a4 zip lock bags or draw string ...


2

I commuted to work for years. It was about 5 miles, half of which was on a dedicated bike trail. It took me roughly 20 minutes. There was always a bit of a chill in the morning, so I never really got all that sweaty. It also helped that I had a very high fitness level at the time, so my body wasn't working as hard as it looked. I would just change into my ...


15

I've a theory that body odour doesn't come from sweat but from bacteria. http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Body-odour/Pages/Introduction.aspx The sweat itself doesn't smell. The unpleasant odour is produced by bacteria on the skin that break down the sweat into acids. Bacteria take a bit of time to grow/multiply. So maybe it doesn't matter much how much ...


3

Adjust your speed to your needs. I never get to work in sweat as I keep my speed to such a level that I do not get too hot. Wearing the right amount of layers helps as well, as does the ambient temperature. Unlike other users here, I do NOT believe in helmets and I never use one. But if you feel the need for one, it does depend on local laws as well as on ...


33

People who are sweating when cycling but not when walking are either cycling in hot weather (worse when steeply uphill with not enough gears), or treating a bicycle as a piece of sports equipment rather than a mode of transportation. When on foot, you walk rather than run. You don't need special clothes for walking or cycling. You do for running or ...


6

I have been commuting for a long time, throughout the year (30km/day), I have a few short tips, that might help you: Get mudguards/fenders, unless you live in a very dry/sunny place Always have lights with you and a HELMET Sunglasses, even clear ones help keep your eyes safe Put your folded up clothes in separate plastic bags (they will not crease, if done ...


40

I've recently started commuting to work 3 times a week and my commute is about 8 miles each way. I've found if I roll my clothes rather than fold them and pack just before I leave, there are no creases when I get to work. I always put my shoes at the bottom of my bag, then trousers rolled up then shirt. I leave my ties in my desk draw and leave my suit ...


2

If you can afford gears, buy them. Having an uphill section at the end you will want to shift up in order to make it easier. Going the oposite direction you will also like the ability to go to a smaller gear to get a little more speed downhill. Looking at the pictures linked, it seemed the that the single speed have a rather small rear cog compared to the ...



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