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1

I have now had a road bike for 3 days since i transferred from mountain biker to road biker. I've done just over 50 miles and my experiences so far would be both bikes have pros and cons. The mountain bike is a LOT slower. The width of the tyres being thicker means more surface contact with the road and it slows you down and requires way more effort to ride ...


1

If you want speed over longer distances, I recommend to buy a Trekking bike. They have 700C wheels, and therefore are faster. My experience is that for 30 min or longer commutes I like speed. For this bike a derailleur gear is better so you can speed up. If you like comfort, you can buy a Cannondale Badboy or similar. With 2" wide tires that handle well the ...


2

Did you like the CitiBike? If so look for a bike like that. A commute bike will normally have slightly larger tires - 28mm-35mm. If you want fenders then get a bike with fenders or at least will take fenders. If you want a rack then get a bike with rack or at least will take a rack. Many manufacturers now have lines called City/Hybrid/Mulituse/Urban (or ...


1

I have the Timbuk2 Especial Viaje convertible backpack/pannier which I use to commute with my work laptop, a MBP 15" Retina. It uses the same rack-attachment hardware as the current edition of the Timbuk2 Shift. That hardware has broken 4 times in my ~8 months of owning the bag. Timbuk2 has been good about sending replacement hardware, but it's still not fun ...


0

This model from Ortleib should work Ortlerib Office-Bag High Visibility


0

I commute with SS and 25c in front and 23c on the back. I live in Zagreb so there is really a lot of variations of terrain, but I like to be fast so I don't mind. I had more problems with wider tiers than with thinner tiers. So, IMHO thin tiers are just fine and I enjoy them, but I also think that you yourself need to try different setup and see what suits ...


2

Germany: (I should explain that I'm mostly biking to get to/from work, so this is about urban streets. But when I ride for fun on weekends, on the relevant paths there's seldomly so much traffic it requires significant regulation.) If there's a street present, usually pedestrians are on the sidewalk and bikes on the street, so there's no conflict. If ...


1

Western Australia: It is a legal requirement here to have a bell or warning device fitted. I have bells on my bikes and generally only use them when approaching pedestrians or cyclists who are either making it difficult to pass (e.g., walking wide or in the centre of the path) or who I feel may make a sudden move that could prove not so good for either of ...


4

I've noticed over the years that if I call out it startles people walking. Most walkers don't expect someone on a bicycle let along someone calling out something they don't understand. So my strategy now is when I get reasonably close I cough. Yup cough, it is a familiar sound and if it's on a quite street the walker will usually turn around to see who's ...


4

I send a single "ping" with my bell. More pings only if I don't see the other person recognizing me (e.g. look at me, wave a hand, change direction etc).


3

Bristol, UK: "Passing on your left/right" usually works, but every once in a while peds (or even cyclists) will move the wrong way. To be on the safe side, I just bell from a good few yards back. If that doesn't provoke a shoulder check, I just roll up slowly and issue a polite "'Scuse me, mind if I pass?"... I think that's probably the best all-round ...


2

In Dayton, OH, the protocol seems to be sneak up on them and shout as your tire starts to overlap. Majority of riders tend to not use bells (and only shout when it is too late) and a smaller slice have the miracle bell (miracle if the other person hears it). However, I have installed dual action bells on all our bikes (or a bugle on my sons) and it ...


4

From Southern California, when approaching slower traffic from behind on bike lanes and paths: "On your left" meaning that you are passing them on their left-hand side. Only left. People hear the "On" portion of the call and they start moving to their right. I can't ever recall hearing "On your right". Good thing, too. Would be a mess.


1

I post an answer but looking for other answers and will not give the check to my answer. I live in Houston and the common protocol is bike left or bike right. Bike left is bike passing on the left. If the pedestrian does not know the protocol they will turn look to the left so things can go bad. If it looks like an experienced runner they probably know ...


6

I commute on two bicycles: — a road bike, with 25mm tire up front and a 28mm back. — a custom commuter bike, with 32mm up front, 35mm back. I'd recommend you go with the 32mm tires. The 28mm tires I've used are good for commuting (I think the 25mm I have is too small — I have to give it too much attention when crossing curb lines and such). That said, ...


3

Not much difference in ride from carbon to Cr-Mo. Over 13km not much of a factor. The carbon is going to be lighter, more expensive, and less durable. Same bike on a budget I would go Cr-Mo. You list two different styles of bikes and a purebred road bike in a comment. Pick the style of bike first. I don't think purebred road bike is the right bike for ...


2

Based on the title alone 32mm tires are not ideal for fast commuter bike. But that picture is some harsh conditions and you state safety is important. For that picture and the pictures you had on the fork question I would go 32mm or even 35mm. A 35mm is not not going to be as fast but it should be softer and have more grip. And also which type of tire. ...


1

Another vote for the PD-A530. In my case I have these on the hybrid and PD-A520's on the Cannondale road bike. Both pairs are adjusted so that they feel the same so the muscle memory on both bikes is the same. In a panic stop, I don't want to have to remember which bike I am on to get out of it. Tom


3

Have had a Trek FX 7.2 for 6 years. Came with 35's. Replaced with 32's. Work very well for pavement. If you are doing any curb jumping or cobblestone, I would not suggest the 28's. If you are looking at a Trek hybrid (love mine), consider a carbon fork model. Mine is all metal and I feel the vibrations in my forearms. That is the ONLY bad thing I have to ...


5

Shimano make several models of pedals with SPD one side, and flat on the other. So they can be used with SPD shoes or normal shoes. Options include: PD-A530 These are designed for road/touring bikes, so are fairly slim, with a small metal platform. (Not to be confused with the PD-A520, which are one-sided SPD pedals, without a flat platform). Personally ...



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