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1

It’s not only a matter of handlebar type. You can already try to get into a more aerodynamic position with your straight handlebar. A shorter straight handlebar can be quite aerodynamic. On a road bike the drops are mostly used for descents, normaly one uses the “hoods” or the tops which aren’t all that “aggressive” or overly aerodynamic. See also ...


1

Drop bars are possible, but you need to measure the effective top tube of your frame and the "reach" of a new drop bar you want to purchase. You didn't tell what hybrid bike you have but I assume the effective top tube on your bike is longer than ones on road bikes. Another consideration is that drop bars have additional reach forward (70-80mm). There's ...


1

I'd start off just riding your bike and noticing what you like (and don't like about your position). Mostly I'd worry about the bars being too low and not having enough options (get low to get out of the wind, sit up straight when your back or neck needs a break, and on and on...). The important thing is that you're comfortable – and as long as the bike ...


1

When spending more time on your bike, it's good to be able to vary your position. For that reason alone I would advice a drop bar or butterfly bar. It'll prevent all kind of small complaints about wrists, shoulders and back. Getting in better shape because of the extra daily exercise, you'll gradually feel more comfortable in a more sportive (aerodynamic) ...


1

Singlespeed is cheap and should be generally sufficient for loaning to students. Anything with dérailleurs is too frail and requires too much maintenance in this conditions. Planetary gear is always nice, but for this kind of situation it should be purchased only if the locale is really hilly, you can find them cheap for some reason, or you have money to ...


3

If there are no hills, do not bother with gears. Students who can use a free bike will be happy enough with a bike that actually works and does not break down just when they need it. If you look at the most popular rental bikes in the Netherlands you do not see any gears. (But if you think it is needed, three gears (or up to 8 gears) inner hub gears ...


5

inner hub gears are near zero maintenance, and as you don't need a thin chain, the external parts (chain, "cassette", etc) can be made fairly sturdy. They also have a nice feature for town use: you can change gear while stopped at the lights. No more anticipation or setting off in the wrong gear. The Sturmey Archer 3 speeds are probably the most affordable ...


2

I would personally go for the 1x8 over the IGH for a couple reasons. The first is initial cost. 3 speed hub is going to cost more than a single 8 speed hub. Also, it makes changing tires a lot easier. Changing the tire on an internal hub can be quite daunting for somebody who's never done it before. Internal hubs are more durable, but there are ...


2

I've known something like this: http://www.cycleexif.com/surly-dual-speed but I don't know this will work for casual bikes. I also agree with @reiheit, internal geared hub is much more nicer idea. An example of this is bike rental system in Taipei (http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/taiwan/archives/2012/12/10/2003549807). I've been in Taipei for a while, and ...


15

I don't think you can make a 3x1 setup work. In order to have the chain change gears, there needs to be a mechanism to take up the slack in the chain. In a normal dual-derailer setup, the rear derailer does that. You might be able to make it work with a chain tensioner, but I'm not sure if you can find one with enough range to do the job as well as a rear ...


1

First, check your local laws. As others have mentionend, in some countries (EU), maximum power for an electric bike is 250W. Go beyond that and the vehicle will be considered a moped and will need license, insurance and and license plates. Your local laws might also require an assist-only option for your bike to be considered an e-bike. That means usually a ...


4

I don't know your body condition: so ... "maybe"? Or, "maybe not now, but maybe soon"? I did 36 km per day (18 km each way): my body is male, aged 50+, weight 75 kg, height 182 cm, but with normal BP. For the first month or two, I didn't do 5 days/week. Some alternatives for you might include: Fewer days/week Only do it one-way somehow (e.g. cycle there, ...


0

Everyone is different (apart from physical condition, there's also tolerance of discomfort, strength of will, etc.), so I would suggest to simply borrow a bike from someone and try (carefully) for yourself... Anyway I agree with other answers that if you have no "blocking" medical conditions, you should be able to train yourself for this.


2

You might be capable to do this, but not immediately. Endurance is an ability which can be trained very well. Except for people with serious health conditions or disabilities, everyone should be able to train themselves to a level where they can ride 2x16km a day comfortably. But wanting too much too early can be counter-productive. I would recommend you to ...


3

Adding to the answer by @andy256 (especially the need to discuss with a doctor)- 32km / day from cold is almost certainly too much, doing it 5 days in row definitely too much, but something that you (baring health problems other than blood pressure) should be able to build up to. You friend is probably right - unless he is saying you will never be able to ...


8

32km per day is a lot for some one who is out of shape. I added the [commuter] tag to your post. If you click on it, you'll see hundreds of posts about commuting. Some are like this one, so your question may get closed if it's a duplicate. Since you know you have health issues, the conservative advice is to discuss your plan with your doctor. If it's ...


0

One thing also to consider is a minimum distance. If you are a sweater (i.e. one who sweats) a shower is a necessary part of bike commuting. If you are going to take the time to get all your gear together, pack a change of clothes, and ride your bike, 5 miles is too short. I sweat in 5 miles. My minimum distance is 10 miles, and max is 15. Anything more than ...


0

I have a 15km commute to work and have been doing it roughly 3x per week (twice a day) for about 8 years. Here's what I have found works: puncture resistant tires are one of the keys -- I found that the Schwalbe Marathon Plus tires were great and in > 6000kms on 2 sets I've experienced a single flat tire. patch kit with a small pump floor pump at home for ...


0

I have done the same commute on my old mountain bike for 18 months, then changed to a Scott 20. The difference was phenomenal. I am doing this most of the year in the west of Ireland. Drop bars are the way to go. I reduced my times considerably once I got used to the completely different gearing. You may need to look closely at your nutrition if you are ...


2

You could also profit from practicing crossing railroad tracks with no or very little traffic - provided you can find such a crossing nearby. That way, you can try techniques and approach the limits of what's possible without risk of getting run over.



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