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One common solution is to move feet slightly forward in relation to where you usually put it when pedaling. This is easily achieved with cleats since their position dictates exactly that. So in short, try moving your cleat further back from its normal position (the ball of the foot) to relieve the nerves at the base of the toes. A suggestion by Lon ...


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All cycle shoes that are compatible with a cleat system are going to reduce your ability to walk naturally to some degree. However, a system with a recessed cleat (e.g., Shimano SPD or Crank Brothers) is going to create the least interference. If you also choose a shoe like these that allows some flexibility, you will have the easiest time walking while ...


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I have used Shimano M424 pedals for several years in XC and Commuting, And at least for me, they result in a very good pedal to use even with non cycling shoes. I have even commuted in regular office shoes with them and they seemed comfortable enough for a 15-45 minute commute. So, for the aim of the original question, this would be indeed my ...


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Yes opinion but cycling shoes I can walk some distance in (say a mile at a time) is not realistic. Even a recessed cleat you are going wear out with mile walks. You are going to muck them up if you walk in dirt. And they are just not comfortable over long distances. A walkable cleat shoe is for 100 yards or less in my book. You should try out some ...


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For many years, I used cheap Forte pedals (Performance Bicycle house brand) with a platform on one side and SPD on the other side. This was on a mountain bike. Shimano M-324 pedals look very similar ($45 at Amazon) I used these pedals for years for all kinds of riding, including singletrack. The dual-sided nature of the pedals made it a bit tricky to get ...


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I have a pair of Wellgo's similar to those pedals, and two pairs of walkable shoes. One pair I had to mod by cutting back the tread around the cleats. The other pair work well with no modifications, but the cleat does touch the ground when walking. I have seen combinations that plain do not work, or worse - the shoe tread jams and you cannot rotate to get ...


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M424 don't really allow normal shoes. I had a set of M545s (the same but with a metal cage) and the cleat stands proud of the cage quite a bit. You can buy single sided pedals* that will let you ride in flats on one side of the pedal and let you clip in on the other. As for shoes, something like the Specialized Tahoe? They're supposed to be wearable as ...


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It is possible. For 250W motor, without any limit, I can go 20 kph on a 8% grade hill. But that will burn your battery and motor, so please be careful about the discharging current limit if you are planning to DIY deep into the software/hardware. Most Chinese brand can be reprogrammed easily with a usb cable to the controller. On flat, I can go 36kph, which ...


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I commuted often on this trail for awhile and loved it. Most of the trail is free of vehicle traffic and has bridges going over roads. It's a heavily shaded trail that can provide a nice respite from the sun during the hot summer. Potholes are minimal, though minor cracks from tree roots are not uncommon. Also, there can be quite a bit of debris on the ...



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