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Latvia Inland intercity trains 🚆 Bicycles are allowed on inland intercity trains operated by Pasažieru vilciens (inland railway public transport service provider) for a fee which amounts to a baggage ticket. Bicycles should be placed in bicycle holders, if a railway wagon is fitted with such holders. Railway wagons with bike holders are marked with a ...


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Switzerland Generally: if there is space you are mostly/often allowed to bring your bike on the bus/train/tram. You are however expected to pay for it (generally a half-fare, the same kids pay). "Long distance" ;) trains ("Intercity") You're allowed to bring bikes, but only in designated wagons which have a special bike compartment. Most of the inter-city ...


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Bangalore, India Regular buses do not allow cycles, especially since the door is too small to take it through. Ac-buses are supposed to allow you to take your cycle. You will be charged an extra 'luggage' fee which keeps changing so I shan't bother mentioning it. However, during peak times conductors will often disallow you due to lack of space. If you want ...


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Japan JR East trains No JR East trains allow unpacked bikes, but folded or packed bicycles are usually fine, no additional fee required. Trains tend to be packed, so placing a bicycle in the very end of a frontmost or rearmost car is least troublesome. From the observation, JR Takasaki line is the least strict and an unpacked bicycle can be taken onto it ...


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New Jersey Transit (New Jersey/New York) Paraphrased/quoted from here. Trains: Folding bikes are usually allowed. Standard-frame bicycles are permitted on many NJ TRANSIT trains as described below: On weekdays - Bicycles are permitted on all weekday trains on all lines except inbound trains that end in Hoboken, Newark or New York between 6 a.m. and ...


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Noone's suggested neither as a practical answer. Personally I keep spare clothes and shoes at work. My tools stay on the bike's frame, as does water. If I'm carrying anything its generally small enough to take in a jersey pocket. So I say No to both backpacks and messenger bags. If I have to move something larger, I will use my bike trailer and tow it ...


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Real track bikes don't have brakes. You need brakes for commuting, especially in a city, and at least 2 independent braking systems. Not all frames and forks have brake mounts. You also won't have fender or rack mounts which are nice in wet weather. Ergonomics and geometry can be an issue, given that track bikes tend to be a bit twitchy and aggressively ...


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Do you use pedal's with cleats? Road shoe cleats will add a bit of thickness to your shoe's sole. MTB cleats are recessed into the sole, but the sole is thicker, which may help too. This could be an expensive way to gain a small amount. Depending on the stop, there may be a kerb/curb where you can place a foot that is higher than the road surface. ...


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Try stopping with one foot down, leaning the bike over and leaving your dominant leg on the pedal with the pedal forward and up ready for a power stroke. By leaning the bike over you can get lots of clearance. I can often even remain on the saddle. When you're ready to go, push off with your non-dominant leg (which is touching the ground) and give a strong ...


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My winter commute tends to be in a well protected velomobile, so I often ride in a light pullover and jeans, socks, and my cycling shoes - and no other layers - in near-freezing temperatures. The inside of the velomobile cabin warms up nicely after the first kilometer.



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