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6

I run The Bike Light Database (which started from a series of blog posts on this very Stack Exchange site). The Cygolite Hotshot and the NiteRider Solas are actually two of my top recommended lights, and I specifically recommend a setup similar to what you're describing. From the recommended taillights page: Putting the Cygolite Hotshot on your rack ...


3

Besides all the obvious health benefits of light physical activity, a bicycle gives - especially for elderly people - freedom and independence, with many benefits for social and mental health. Many people don't drive or don't have access to a car, public transport is too limited, and walking to shops or social activities is just too far. With a bicycle ...


2

Apart from a better health, a faster commute, a happier life, a better environment, and other factors, there aren't a lot of benefits. As for risks: it is easier and more attractive to steal a high-end 3000€ bicycle than to steal a crappy 3000€ car. If you cannot park it safely at home and at work, cycling on a good bicycle will leave you worrying about ...


10

Long term benefits ... Hmmm ... does 55 years count as long term? If so, I think I and a few others here qualify ... Key benefits Cycling is a life-long form of exercise. One of the group I meet for coffee is 82, another is 80. A bunch are in their sixties and seventies, and another bunch are in their fifties. About a quarter are women. Another bunch I ...


2

Well as far as I can say pros outrun the cons . The only cons that I can think about are that of slightly damaging your knee caps and other soft tissue in the legs . But I think they will get generated back rapidly


1

I have had similar issues with numb feeling in my toes. Have tried my cleats in every possible position but it did not help. My local bicycle shop owner suggested some arch supports, he thought it had to do do with me having quite an high arch that pressing it down that much interrupted the blood flow. Since I have arch supports I have not had any numb toes ...


1

When you think about the time involved it is worth thinking about the "total cost" – all of the costs (in time) that go into your commute. For example: If you were driving or taking public transit how long would it take you to earn the cost of the commute (don't forget taxes)? Do you include time for exercise in your day? The commute time could do double ...


1

There is probably a combination of things that can help. Periodically getting your weight off can help as can making sure your pedaling stroke includes ankle flexion. In my experience, that helps a lot with circulation in my feet. Obviously, you'll want to make sure your shoes are not laced or velcro-ed too tight. I will often stand in the pedals and do ...


1

How much clearance do you have on the front wheel? Doesn’t look like you can fit much more than 25mm width there. With your weight and luggage I’d go as wide as possible. Maybe 25mm in the front and 28mm in the back (if the brake has enough clearance). Of course it also depends on the quality of the roads.


1

If you have a bike you can ride now, I'd suggest putting its gear configuration into an online gear calculator (I'm kind of fond of this) so that you can see the ratios and spacings of a bike you've ridden and compare them with the options you're considering for your new bike. For me, I'm most interested in a gear that feels good for cruising on the flat ...


0

Some math: the bold numbers are turns of the rear wheel per turn of the crank. 39/52 crankset: with 11-25 cassette: from 39/25 = 1.56 to 2/11 = 4.73 with 12-28 cassette: from 39/28 = 1.39 to 52/12 = 4.33 with 12-30 cassette: from 39/30 = 1.3 to 52/12 = 4.33 34/50 crankset: with 11-25 cassette: from 34/25 = 1.36 to 50/11 = 4.55 with 12-28 ...


2

I have been riding to work for about 20 years now and my round trip distances have ranged from 35-75 km (50 km currently). It will be difficult to jump into riding 40 km every day, 5 days a week if you have little riding experience. Fatigue can quickly accumulate depending on how hard you ride each day. Instead, I would suggest starting with just a few ...


0

It will depend on the rim width, according to Schwalbe's table of tire size to rim widths you'd be fine with a 17 or 19 mm rim and you'd be pushing it if you have a 21 mm rim.


0

The bike would sit about 4 mm lower is the main thing (and technically, the gearing will change slightly). You can mount the tire on there and it will work, but it may not be optimal depending on your rim width; if the rim is too wide for the tire, you may get more flats or rim damage when you hit a road hazard. As for why you want to switch to something ...



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