New answers tagged

1

My limited* experience with Shimano SPD was that a drop of oil on the cleats can resolve the hard-to-get-out problem. (*) Only had them for a year quite a while back, didn't like the feel.


6

Bald-ness isn't a problem on tires used on roads. In fact, it's favorable. I'd replace the tire once I start getting flats (or a bit before), or seeing canvas. The primary advantage of tubeless would let you run lower pressures (since you can't pinch flat a tube if it isn't there) which is useful for running big tires while mountain biking for more grip ...


0

Panniers vs. Rucksacks in weather: In hot weather I always use my pannier(s)...a rucksack on your back will decrease your ability to cool down, regardless what the manufacturer says! In very cold weather I sometimes switch back to a rucksack because it keeps me warmer. Panniers can catch the wind and take the bike away from you and some people find it ...


3

In the end, you generally get a better workout when you have a faster bike. This is because you usually end up riding more often/longer distances than you would otherwise. Also, riding fast is fun. And when you're having fun you don't notice the pain nearly as much. Just enjoy it and feed your speed addiction. You won't lose fitness. More likely you'll be ...


4

Bike weight and performance is only one factor. Your average speed and whether or not you have inclines would also factor in, of course. You can have a light bike with skinny wheels and burn as many calories by averaging 18mph, or a heavy bike and burn the same calories at a lower speed, etc... Coincidentally, this month's Bicycling Magazine has a brief ...


-1

use single speed for high end and just rely upon your grip on handle and pedals.Doing so u can increase the inertia of your mtb so that it moves way along with u. Secondly,if u use fenders in rain,please remove them if not required.That's all i can say.


1

I would caution against it, not because of the belt drive, but because of the internal gear hub. I commuted for 2 years on a SRAM IGH. Water always got inside it until it rusted so bad it was useless. When it was cold, the water in the hub would freeze into a block of ice and I'd have to warm it before I could ride. I replaced it with an Alfine 11 and the ...


4

Yes, the gearing should be fine. from http://www.sheldonbrown.com/nexus8.shtml the lowest ratio is 0.57 which is as low as many mountain bikes. The belt is actually wider than a metal chain and has longer life, so should be more robust: http://www.conti-drive-system.com/pages/faq/faq_en.html. But the internal hub has more moving parts, so is slightly less ...


0

UK Trains Virgin Trains accept bikes, however you must reserve a space first. You can book at the station ticket office at least 15 minutes before the train arrives, or over the phone [0344 556 5659, Option 1] at least 60 mins. before (as you have to wait for the system to update and then collect your reservations from a self-service machine). You can ...


2

Latvia Inland intercity trains 🚆 Bicycles are allowed on inland intercity trains operated by Pasažieru vilciens (inland railway public transport service provider) for a fee which amounts to a baggage ticket. Bicycles should be placed in bicycle holders, if a railway wagon is fitted with such holders. Railway wagons with bike holders are marked with a ...


1

Switzerland Generally: if there is space you are mostly/often allowed to bring your bike on the bus/train/tram. You are however expected to pay for it (generally a half-fare, the same kids pay). "Long distance" ;) trains ("Intercity") You're allowed to bring bikes, but only in designated wagons which have a special bike compartment. Most of the inter-city ...


0

Bangalore, India Regular buses do not allow cycles, especially since the door is too small to take it through. Ac-buses are supposed to allow you to take your cycle. You will be charged an extra 'luggage' fee which keeps changing so I shan't bother mentioning it. However, during peak times conductors will often disallow you due to lack of space. If you want ...


2

Japan JR East trains No JR East trains allow unpacked bikes, but folded or packed bicycles (in bags) are usually fine, no additional fee required. Trains tend to be packed, so placing a bicycle in the very end of a frontmost or rearmost car is least troublesome. From the observation, JR Takasaki line is the least strict and an unpacked bicycle can be taken ...


1

New Jersey Transit (New Jersey/New York) Paraphrased/quoted from here. Trains: Folding bikes are usually allowed. Standard-frame bicycles are permitted on many NJ TRANSIT trains as described below: On weekdays - Bicycles are permitted on all weekday trains on all lines except inbound trains that end in Hoboken, Newark or New York between 6 a.m. and ...



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