Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

I stopped trying to use glasses/goggles long ago and have gotten away with it because we rarely have wind here when it gets cold. However, I have started using a Cold Avenger when the temperature drops below 0F. I find that it saves my lungs on long rides. After looking at their advertising, it is supposed to keep goggles/glasses from fogging as well ...


-1

Any snorkeler will tell you... Saliva is a great anti-fog coating for the inside of your goggles.


2

I suspect you will find 800 lumen to be plenty, even for avoiding debris on unlit roads. For context, I commute in the dark (and often in the rain) along unlit back roads and along our regional trail system which is unlit double track gravel with forest coverage. I often need to avoid fallen branches, rabbits and the odd deer that pops out of the trees at ...


0

I got a Niterider Lumina 700 for about $100 on Amazon. It's plenty bright for commuting (most of the time I don't even use the high setting) on unlit roads, it throws a pretty wide beam, and the light is very white. It's rechargeable through USB which is awesome, so I charge it up at work when I see the indication that it's getting low.


0

I run a 200 lumen headlamp that claims 175 hours out of 4 AAs and cost roughly $100. In the wide mode (outside spread LEDs) it produces more than enough light to be seen with and I can see with it fairly well. When I need more light, I can cut over to the big beam and see as much as I need to. I bought it mainly for racing, but the battery life was so ...


1

MTBR.com does a big review of lights every year; here is the one for 2015. They have a ton of useful information.


3

Going fast on unlit roads you definitely want a decent light. Personally I find the combination of my 100 lumen dyno headlight plus another 100 lumens on the handlebars to be enough, but I ride relatively slowly and on a manoeuvrable bike. On a faster bike with handling and brakes designed for speed you want more. Perhaps not 2000 lumens - that's off road ...


1

I used to commute 14 kilometers one way, which makes up 28 both ways to work every day. Needed to get used at first but it did not take much time. A bicycle moves 22 km/h in average in a tight traffic with lights, +-3 km/h if you are lucky or not, which makes some 40 minutes for the whole trip - not a big deal, really. I did not ride in rain and when it is ...


1

My commute is exactly the same:18km one way. I have an electric motor 350w that helps a lot, on normal days no shower needed in the morning. I tried all possible side roads until I found a nicer route, even if that is 5km more, I prefer the safer and quieter way.


1

It's all relative. I ride 8 km each way to work, and I ride all year in the wet and rainy Pacific Northwest of Washington State. There is a guy at work who rides about 22 km each way, and he too rides all year. My route puts me in traffic most of the way, but Washington State is regarded as the most bike friendly state in the U.S. On your question of ...


2

Traffic varies a lot between countries - my guess is that it quite a different thing in India than in Denmark. During the last 20 years many Danish cities have been completely re-designed to better accommodate the many bikes - often by reducing the number or width of the car lanes to make room for dedicated bike lanes. And for a city like Copenhagen, it has ...


3

Gotta say I agree with Chris Pink (who'd a thunk it, if it's the same Chris Pink from a certain boaty forum) I've never hit an animal on the towpath. Sounds to me like you are not riding to the conditions. I know when I ride at night, where there is no lighting you need to slow down a lot, even if you have decent lights. Yelling out before going around a ...


-1

Easy - stop treating my home as a racetrack and you won't hit anything. In 30 years of cycling the towpath I've never hit anything and I don't very often use lights.


3

Would making more noise (without being obnoxiously loud) be an answer? Constantly twiddling a bike bell would be distracting, but a few jingle bells you could hang on your bike or gear might help alert the critters that you're coming.


2

In the heat of the summer I like to take night rides on some lite paths to get out of the sun. For night rides I ride my mountain bike as it is slower and more agile. And if I hit an animal (or other obstacle) I would have a better chance of staying on two wheels. And as linc answered (+1) light it up. And hit the bell or yell rider before a blind ...


10

My commute brings me through a park with a lot of rabbits (or similar animals, not a zoologist here) and it has been rather close a few times ... I use a head lamp when driving there at night for two reasons: It allows me to see through turns much better The eyes of animals reflect directly back at you, which helps to see them a little earlier All that ...



Top 50 recent answers are included