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0

Steel, steel, steel. Anyone who has owned a good to high end steel bike (4130 tubing or better, with Prestige being perhaps at the top of the touring food chain) and has also owned aluminum will disparage aluminum until the sun goes down. There is no comparison. As to bar ends, they are perfect for touring, and cantilever brakes are the best choice ...


4

Using a loud horn to vent your anger is not a good idea. Scared/confused drivers behave even worse than normal drivers, and a loud noise coming from a bike can confuse them. They look around for the car/truck that is blasting them, they won't be looking for a cyclist as they don't expect a horn noise to come from one. They may then waver from their line ...


0

Check out the Orp Smart Horn. It's a bike light and a high powered bike-horn. It should be loud enough to get noticed by cars, not just a dinky bell sound. It also doubles as a visibility light and is USB rechargeable. I don't have personal experience with this, but I was looking at ordering one for myself. http://www.orpland.com/


2

My Velomobiel Quest has (in addition to some puny bicycle bell, which is mandatory in the Netherlands) an electrical motorcycle horn. It is driven by an R/C model car battery pack. It's relatively loud (sadly also inside the Quest) and keeps road-raging motorists at bay quite well. It might even be possible to get a 6V variant of the horns such that you can ...


6

Here are a few loud horns: The hornit: http://usa.thehornit.com/ A shop I used to work at sold these and they are extremely loud - around 140 decibels, but they sound like a loud beep rather than a horn. It takes 2 AAA batteries. Costs $45 US. The nice thing about this one is the button to press is remote, so you can have the horn on your fork or wherever. ...


4

A cyclocross bike is designed for cyclocross racing. This typically involves riding as quickly as possible around a muddy field. So for a cyclocross bike: Lightweight frame and forks, usually aluminium or carbon More 'aggressive' riding position, with lower down bars Nearly horizontal top tube, to allow carrying it over your shoulder Knobbly tyres, and ...


1

The tyres :) I will be honest I have no idea what a cyclocross commuter is or why it would exist. Cyclocross bikes are basically road bikes with V or disk brakes and tyres with some tread. What major differences do you notice from this description and bike x? The only thing I could imagine is they switch up the bars and tires to slicks.


7

Some tips I've gathered from being on both sides of the fence. Since you're specifically asking riding safely and minimizing motorist antagonism, there are some which will work but might not appeal to your sense of justice/fairness: Even higher visibility. One way of antagonising drivers is to appear at the last moment, since they won't have time to plan ...


16

In my experience, no. The problem is that however polite you try to be you're taking the lane so you're in their way. My commute takes me over a narrow one-lane-each-way bridge that's a bit of a choke point, so it's busy. It's also a raised bridge, so sight lines are very poor. Since I ride it twice a day I've had the chance to experiment with some ...


0

18 km is very manageable. You might feel it for the first few days, but you'll quickly get used to it. Make alternate plans for the rainy, or just not feeling up to it, days. Be prepared to change your mind just as you're about to leave the door... So have those bus tickets ready.


0

Get a bike fitted to you for this. Seriously, go to a good bike shop in your area and have them do a proper bike fitting for you. They do this for free if you buy a bike with them, if you don't you should expect to pay about $30,-. If you don't buy the bike there make sure you know how to check if a bike fits you. A bike that has the wrong fit can lead to ...


3

I agree with most answers but I think they all assume you will ride in a sporty fashion, but you don't have to, at least not all days. Does a driver race their car everyday on the way to work or school? Commuting is totally different from bike racing or training, you can combine the two, but the purpose of commuting is "getting there on time", you don't ...


-1

Depends on how sore your butt gets. If you are in lots of butt pain, you won't ride again the next day. You'll need to buy a but soreness meter first, or you could be in a lot of trouble on the way home.


3

You can definitely do it, the points about rest are good ones though. If you are commuting every day, I think it takes a conscious effort to take it easy on most days, and "reward" yourself by letting your body just have at it on others. The second part of that question is how you'll be presentable when you get there? Especially at first, you may sweat a ...


6

Yes, I say it's perfectly possible. In fact I've done something similar twice in my life. 1 - At 28 I decided to start cycling to work. I rode for leisure occasionally but this was a big change. The commute was about 14 km each way and generally uphill on the way to work in the morning and downhill on the way home. The difference in altitude between start ...


2

As it seems you've found, since there is no way to compare Beginner A and Beginner B to one another, there is only one way to find out: give it a try. That said, maybe not every day at first.


5

Since I exclusively ride cleated pedals, what I always do whenever I need to come to a full stop is to shift to a low enough gear (on flats I'd shift to 34/21 or 34/23 -- I have a 'compact', ie. 50/34 crank), unclip my left foot, brake, then as I come to a stop, I shift my body towards the top tube and stand over it with my left foot on the ground. Usually ...


9

Yeah, I would suggest that you not start out doing this daily, but do it every 2nd or 3rd day for a couple of weeks, taking care to take an extra rest day when needed. You will find that some days you are eager to get started riding and others your stomach churns at the thought, and you can kind of use that to adjust your frequency. After about 2 weeks, ...


19

18km a day is not far, as long as you have an OK fitness level to start with and no health issues, it is certainly achievable, but... You will not get any rest days. I was once told, you do not get fit exercising, you get fit recovering. If you ride 5 days a week, there's no recovery time. This could lead to problems since each day's effort is stressing ...


12

These are the options I use depending on the circumstances: Trackstand: Requires a lot of practice and it is a bit of a swhowoff. (This is the one I use the less) Partially Dismount: Preferred when riding cleated pedals. Dominant foot stays on the pedal, and the pedal is kept ready for a full stroke (at 45 degrees over the horizontal as the other answer ...


3

If you can't time it so you don't actually get caught at the light, you pretty much just have to dismount. As Daniel R Hicks mentioned, you can use a curb if one's available, but that's not always the case. And on a personal note, my strong leg is my right leg and since I live in America, the curbs are on the right, which makes that method less appealing to ...


1

Well, you can't get around losing some/most of your momentum at a red light but if you do it clever, you can play with the timing of the lights and decrease your speed in such a way, that you won't have to stop completely. If you're very familiar with who gets green after whom, you can plan even better. Good practice is also to not put the feet down but ...


1

I run my own company, and therefore had ready access to this scheme since I was both the employer and the employee, but I actually decided against it altogether. Now, this was a couple of years ago, so you'll need to check whether what I say still applies, but this is what I found: You have a twelve-month agreement where essentially the company buys the ...



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