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New York City You may bring your bike on the subway at all times (though it's quite rude to do it at rush hour). You may bring your train on the commuter railroads during off-peak times. There are no bike racks on any buses. http://web.mta.info/bike/


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Urbana/Champaign/(Parts of) Savoy, Illinois, USA The Champaign-Urbana Mass Transit District has almost all buses which can take 2 bikes in the front. The rules are here.


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Personally I enjoy running as much as riding. If I could not carry the second bike I would ride one home, run back, ride the other home. It would take a bit longer and be a great workout....... Presuming 2 bikes @10km/h that is about 45-50 minutes (without prangs), or 30km/h (2*16minute) on bikes + 5 minute/km (40 minute) run - 1:15.


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Ghostride it, so long as you're not dealing with high speeds or heavy traffic: http://www.instructables.com/id/How-To-Ghostride-a-Bike/ And make sure you have a soundtrack:


18

If one bike has a rear rack, you can attach the second bike's front wheel with a bunch of bungies and tow it. I've done this, and it worked fine. Now I have a cargo bike, and the towing is simpler:


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My friend was able to ride a few miles with a second bike attached to his backpack with a ropes. You need a wide road for this way of transportation and it can be tricky to tie bike in such a way that it doesn't weights to one side. Also, you can detach wheels and tie them to the frame, so bike will be more compact.


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I'd walk with both bikes - with each hand on their seats, one to the left and other to your right. Bicycles can be easily pushed and steered when holding them at the seat (in the same manner as you would correct steering when riding without hands, through the balance). I find it easier than pulling them by the middle of handlebars as others suggest. Doing ...


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Walk :) Safest. I do this from time to time (usually when one of the kids have 'forgotten' their bike), and find it easiest to do as pr above, but with a little variation. If the transported bike is lightweight and otherwise allows it, simply 'wear' it as a backpack, putting your arm through the big triangle. Once it's on, you can determine if it will ...


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If you are reasonably firm at riding one-handed, you can drive them home by riding one of them while pushing/pulling the other one beside you with one hand. Let's assume that the bike you will ride is called A and the one you push/pull is B. First decide, which bike is better to be ridden and therefore will be your bike A and which hand is better to get ...


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One possible way is to ride one bike and push the other. One hand goes to handlebars and front brake, the other grips the second bike by the handlebar stem. This is slow and clumsy, of course, but if you are able to ride the said route with no hands, you should be able to move both bikes as well.


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If somebody in a car draws level with you and you feel the situation is dangerous, just brake and they'll whizz by. I've done this several times; the motorist has never tried to stay level or slowed down to let me catch up. And even if the motorist does slow down, you can just stay safely behind them, where it's much harder for them to hurt or intimidate ...


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My experience is mostly in Canada as well (southern Ontario), so perhaps I can provide a closer-to-home viewpoint. I bike in a city with poor infrastructure that was designed for cars first, and everything else second (though that's changing). This means I get into a lot of situations where drivers honk at me, typically around 1 incident per 100km biked ...


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What is their intent? To get you out of their way, and to get you off the road. You already know when your tire is flat, something fell off, or your shirt is un-tucked. Sometimes you might get a quick beep if they are going to pass. You might know the person as well and they are being friendly, but I asked my wife not to honk at me from behind. How ...


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If you're in the correct position, you can either fight, flight or embarrass. If you're in the wrong place, than just admit you're wrong, wave an apologetic hand and move on. Assuming you're in the right (and it sounds like you were), then first option is to fight. A scowling look, with a snarling "what?" and then pointing out the helmet cam on the lid ...


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Broadly, not a lot. Legally it's probably technically unlawful on several grounds (horn not used as a warning device, causing alarm, loud noise, possibly harassment), but they're all petty offences and unlikely to get a useful response from Police. If it happens in front of a cop they might pull the motorist over for a chat, but that's unlikely. My answer ...


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Bullying I am assuming that you are female, given that your screen name is Michelle. While there can be many suggestions about safe riding, the main point here is that these (male?) drivers are just bullying you. Plain and simple. One solution some cyclists use is to carry an obvious helmet camera, so that their behavior is witnessed. Edit: on ...


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I know this is an old question, but I'm in a very similar situation to the OP's. I have bikes, an ElliptiGO, and a Catrike. I have done some winter biking, but I think the recumbent is much better suited for this, for a few reasons: You can go as slow as you have to, or even stop, without having to disengage your feet from the pedals. If necessary, put it ...


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I ride a SS fixed gear 3 times a week. My advice when the hill is hard and steep is to do what feels natural. Stand up. Move as much of your weight forward as possible. I notice a huge difference when I take weight off the back wheel. The hill is already putting your weight more back. Counter this by putting your weight more on the front. Pull up on the ...


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First choice is flat or drop bars Flat bars Mountain bike style bars. A more upright position. Comfortable and agile but not very aerodynamic. The single position is fatiguing on long rides. Drop bars Road style bars. A variety of positions to spread fatigue and deal with head winds. The distance between the seat and the bars and the height of the ...


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I'm speaking very generally here, but sitting straight up can be comfortable for quite short periods. Probably the most upright are sit-up-and-beg bikes, and if you go over to Holland you'll see 70- and 80-year-olds riding them. The downside is that they're not the fastest bikes around. At the other end of the scale, take a look at professional road racers. ...


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It depends on the bike. If you're commuting on a race bike, you'll be more hunched over than if you were commuting on a cruiser. A lot of people use road bikes in NYC, which force you to be more hunched over than on something like a citibike. The parts of the bike which contribute to the hunched over ness is primarily the top tube length (the top bar on a ...



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