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5

The internal width is obviously one important feature. But for indexed shifting the ring has a pattern embossed on the side facing the smaller ring that catches the pins of the chain when shifting. The combo of the embossing depth/pattern and the ring-to-ring spacing affects what width chain (and brand chain) will work best with the ring. I've no idea ...


5

The Deore XT is a mountain bike derailleur and as such has is long cage dérailleur. Long cage dérailleurs can run larger cassettes for a larger gearing range (at the cost of larger jumps between gears). I don't know what the Shimano product selection was like in 1999, but you can now get Shimano 105 as either long or short cage depending on your set up (see ...


4

As long as your choosing a 9 speed Shimano shifter for the rear and triple shifter for the front you'll be fine. That's basically everything in the Deore lineup, as long as it's 9 speed. Obviously you'll want to stay away from 10 speed shifters and dont try to mix and match Shimano derailleurs and SRAM shifters or vice versa. Though you didn't ask this, what ...


4

They make slick tires for mountain bikes used as commuters (and fat slick tires which the air provides a lot of cushioning). Some examples are Schwalbe's fat franks or big apple's (these are more baloonbike) or Marathons . Thinner doesn't necessarily mean more comfortable - in fact, the smaller the tire, the less comfortable it will typically be (this is a ...


4

Those wheels come either with a Campagonolo compatible freehub; or a Shimano/SRAM compatible freehub. If you buy the one for Shimano/SRAM (as of this writing, out of stock in Wiggle), you'll be able to use your existing cassette. To quote @PeteH: "The 9-speed Shimano cassette that you already have, the total height of it is the same as the total ...


4

My understanding is that the chain pins for Shimano 10-speed chains are 6.0mm in length and the pins for the 11-speed chains are 5.8mm in length. That is pretty close, but I wouldn't chance it. I also don't know for sure if the pin diameter is the same and I don't have an 11-speed pin to measure. A simple google search turns up many places where you can ...


4

Usually racing front derailleurs like an arabesque will not allow the extra tolerance for a third ring. With that being said, the only way to know for sure is to try it. One thing to keep in mind is that the spindle length on your bottom bracket affects this as well. While your derailleur may have the extra tolerance to fudge it in some cases, if your ...


3

The 9-speed Shimano cassette that you already have, the total height of it is the same as the total heights of their their 10- and 11-speed cassettes. So any of them will fit onto a wheel, provided as @yivi says you have the correct freehub. Therefore you're not obliged to change from 9-speed. In order to fit more gears onto a cassette, each cog is made ...


3

Before you rush to spend money on different bars and different shifters, have you ever considered a shorter stem? Perhaps a photo of your current bars/stem, and/or an actual measurement of your stem would help me to be more specific. You should measure it center-to-center, as shown in the illustration (3). What I've found is that I get back pain when I'm ...


3

As long as the 5600 and 5700 cassettes contained the same number of gears, the two cassettes will be interchangeable. They're both 10-speed, so you'll be fine. You'd have had problems going from a 9- to 10-speed, or going from a 10- to 11-speed. The reason in each case would be because of chain width. update - as @jimirings points out, the RD-5600 is spec'd ...


2

It's counterintuitive but brakes with a mushy feel are actually going to have more power. This is due to the difference in cable pull ratio. It also means you'll have to run the pad a little closer to the rim, which can be an issue if your wheels are out of true. Overall, I think this would be a great setup. The new 105s are great brakes, and you'll have ...


2

You need to check on three things to ensure that your new chainrings will work: The number of arms on your spider. Road bikes typically have five. The bolt spacing. This is most commonly expressed in BCD, or Bolt Center Diameter. The idea of BCD is a simple one, it's the distance from the center of a crankbolt to the crankbolt immediately opposite it on ...


2

As suggested in a comment on the question, the load generator for the Tacx Basic in the early 2000's was the same load generator used across the entire Tacx ergometer line. The Basic, the Grand Excel, the Flow, and the I-Magic all used the same load generator, so the head units are interchangeable. The capabilities of the Basic can thus be "upgraded" by ...


2

Yes, the Acera 8-speed cassette that you link to should be compatible with an 8-speed Deore deailleur and shifters. The main compatibility issue is the spacing of sprockets, which changes with the number of sprockets and can vary between manufacturers. This cassette spacing cribsheet details the spacing for 8-speed Shimano cassettes, which should be the same ...


2

The short answer is yes (with apologies to jimrings). The long answer is that your choice is very limited (and depends on your definition of road tyre - do you mean road-bike tyre or road-use tyre)?. You'll need to look at http://sheldonbrown.com/tire-sizing.html#width or similar for what widths are compatible, and for urban riding (debris) or light ...


2

The short answer is no. Now for the long answer... Mountain bike and road bike wheels are different diameters and use tires that are different diameters. Specifically, mountain bikes use 26" tires and road tires use the ridiculously meaningless 700c sizing. I won't get into what these sizes mean here, but you can find more info on this site or, if you ...


2

According to the instructions for that derailleur, the maximum sprocket size is 27 teeth. My guess is that one tooth won't make it completely inoperable, but it could. The derailleur might simply not have the range of motion to shift onto a sprocket that large. However, I'd bet that it's more likely that shifting just wouldn't be ideal. On a side note, ...


2

Bottom bracket compatibility is usually determined by the crank— the manufacturer will specify a length. You can run into clearing issues using an MTB crank with a road bike or vice-versa, but that's not an issue for you. However, if you're using a road double crank converted to a single, you won't really be in the normal usage spec of the crank, and exact ...


1

The most important thing to consider is your frame, not your crankset. You can make almost any crankset work for a singlespeed. Your frame needs to have horizontal dropouts so that you can tension the chain. Or you can use a chain tensioner, which is essentially the spring part of a rear derailleur. Looks like the San Jose has horizontal drops, so you're ...


1

Since the 11 speed chain is narrower, the connection pin will be narrower than for a 10 speed. While it might work, I certainly wouldn't recommend it. What you can do is use a SRAM powerlock designed for 10 speed applications.


1

According to http://dahon.com/mainnav/folding-bikes/single-view/bike/speed_p8-1.html your bike has direct pull (a.k.a V-brakes). Your brake shoes should have threaded studs with spherical washers. There isn't really a point in getting a set with a holder given how often brakes on a folder would have to be replaced and the price difference, but Kool Stop does ...


1

Speaking under correction, because I don't know the exact model, but have owned Shimano & SRAM in the last few years. The two systems aren't compatible to the point that you can just swap the left side crank. But, you will be able to swap both sides. In other words, once you've taken the left side off, the right side, with chainrings and all should ...


1

Edit: First question, why did you replace the derailleur? Rear derailleurs don't really care about # of speeds - its the shifters which change the cable pull to move them around (so mixing shimano and sram can cause problems due to different amounts of cable pull). By RD not aligned with gears, do you mean the hanger / cage are bent? If so, go to your LBS ...


1

There's a great thread here that describes some of this. Here's the meat of it though: Shimano's assertion that you need to use "flat-bar" front derailleurs with "flat-bar" shifters is false. When working with Shimano, "flat-bar" shifters are really just mountain-bike shifters in different colors. This doesn't make a difference for the rear ...


1

Providing that is of the same type and size it will interchange. As an example hollow-tech II 10 speed BB30 English will interchange Dura-Ace, Ultegra, 105 will all fit. Ceramic bearings are sold as smoother hence less resistance, will you notice the difference? It is hard to say, but probable not except in your wallet.


1

Yes, it will work, but you need to double check shifting range settings — stops — on the front derailleur. I recommend use second and third positions of shifter for inner and outer rings respectively (not the first and second). If you will use not only triple front shifter but also a triple front derailleur you must consider that shifting on double ...


1

Using the "approved" chain is probably better if all else is equal, and it may be worth a slightly increased cost for more peace of mind. If you already have the mountain-specific chain, there's no harm in trying it. And if the mountain-specific chain is far cheaper and you aren't picky about shifting performance, it will probably be adequate (but no ...


1

The main compatibility problems arising between SRAM and Shimano is with the rear derailleurs. The SRAM numbered models (X-7/9/0/X etc) will only work with SRAM rear derailleurs (and v.v). Front derailleurs are compatible (I use SRAM shifters and an XT front derailleur). In terms of the shifters you should be fine. The only difference I can think of for the ...


1

As with many things bike related, it might not meet the specs, but that doesn't mean that it won't work. Some questions that will help answer the question: Are you using friction or index shifting for the front? If friction (such as bar-end shifters) you should be fine. If indexed, you might have incompatibilities with cable pull, especially if you're ...


1

The ANT Wireless guys run a certification program and post the certified devices on a directory, you can find the Duotrap on there. http://www.thisisant.com/directory/duotrap-digital-speed-cadence-sensor/



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