Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

25

A mountain bike will never really be a road bike. The geometry and construction of the frame is different. Mountain bike frames are designed for a different posture and are often designed for a suspension fork, as well as generally being beefier. You can set up a mountain bike with slick tires and drop bars if you want. I've tried this before and the ride ...


17

You can get a set of slicks or semi-slick tires that will reduce your rolling resistance. If you're using it to commute lots as well then fenders are awesome to keep the rain off. I have a snap on rear fender that goes on any bike I'm riding if it's raining (outside of races). I hate having a wet butt.


12

The first thing to consider is tires.You'll want to mount the smoothest skinniest tires at the highest pressure that your wheels will accomodate.The knobbies add alot of rolling resistance.You'll know after the first ride if you need to make changes to the gearing.The most effective change would be to swap the the big chainring.The 42 tooth is pretty much ...


9

If you want to use it for "proper mountain biking" (however you define that) the answer is almost certainly no. You won't be able to fit wide enough tyres to give you decent grip, and punctures are likely to be a problem. Additionally, the geometry will be all wrong (if you put straight bars on it you'll probably feel quite cramped without a long stem, which ...


9

Answer: No you don't need a new hub. However, you will probably need to put a small (~1mm) spacer at the back of the cassette, otherwise you won't be able to tighten the whole cassette down. Also be aware that prolonged use of a 10-speed cassette on an 8/9-speed freehub body will cause dents to form in the freehub body (because the 10-speed cogs are so ...


7

This can be done two ways: Easy way: Purchase a new 700c wheel with coaster brake hub from your Local Bike Shop or the internet. It may be hard to find this as it is not a particularly popular option, but it's not uncommon to find one at a well-appointed bike shop. Hard way: Purchase a new coaster brake hub, and rebuild your existing rear wheel (or have it ...


7

Yes, this has been done and is very often done for the exact reason you mentioned: far greater tire selection. In a general sense, the important considerations you must make stem from the difference between a 700c wheel and a 27" wheel. If we look at a more precise measurement than the common nomenclature, the bead seat diameter, the difference is more ...


7

Assuming the hub is a freehub design (the freewheel mechanism is in a splined body onto which the cassette (sprockets) fit), no. 8, 9 and 10 speed cassettes are all the same width. See: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/k7.html#10cassettes


7

On my Hard Rock Pro I've changed tyres to Marathon Plus, upgraded crankset to a lighter one with bigger outer ring, better chain and faster/lighter rear cassette, wider contoured grips, squeezed a full rear mudguard around my disc brake and fitted a front mudguard...I'm now told that I shouldn't be running 60-70psi because stock MTB wheels can't take it, so ...


7

The desired conversion is possible, but maybe Trek won't do it as a "default" service. You could consider going to the local bike shop and trade some of the bike parts (specially the gearing system) for a coaster brake wheel. If your bike is like the one in the photo, you need to replace the rear hub, and get rid of the cogset, the derailer and the ...


6

I performed such experiment sometime. This is what i did: Changed my wheelset for one made of light narrow rims and the smallest 26" tires I could get at the moment. Those where 1.9 or something similar and they where almost "slicks". The tires were inflated to their maximum labeled presure, 65 psi. I kept the brake system, it was v-brake. Just adjusted ...


6

Yeah, so long as you're more looking at simple recreation/commuting and not expecting to set any speed/distanced records, you can do a fair job of conversion. First get smoother, higher pressure tires, ideally a bit narrower than your current ones. You do not have to switch to 700C rims, though your choices with 26" rims will be somewhat limited. Next, ...


6

Some possible culprits: cog and the chainring are not in line. rear hub is not tight enough and twists under load (see 1.) chain is stretched or cogs worn out - so the chain doesn't 'seat' well in teeth what the shop says - chain not tight enough


6

$50 - $100 isn't going to get you much in parts, especially any that would be an "upgrade" from your current setup. If you're riding your bike often, it's possible that you'll spend an amount approaching that this year on new tubes and/or tires when you get a flat or wear your tires out. My suggestion would be to ride this bike and enjoy it. You'll get your ...


6

Adapters like this do exist, e.g. http://www.danscomp.com/489051.php?cat=PARTS or http://www.bentechbikes.com/vbrakes.htm In fact I used one on my old folding bike - but you can see it looks a bit of a mess, and when I tried it on the front fork, it really wasn't up to the job (I ended up using a chunky long reach caliper brake taken off a BMX bike). (I'd ...


6

Yes, a battery holder and switch from radio shack would accomplish this. Most dynamos are 6vac and can be replaced with 4xAAs or the 5vdc from a USB pack. You can ignore the issue about polarity as the dyno lights that I've worked are either incandescent and don't care or are LED but have built in blocking diodes and don't care. Whether you would want to do ...


5

Can you turn you MTB into a good, road worthy machine? Short answer: Sure, why not? If you intend to do any road racing,forget about it, HOWEVER, if having a quick and sturdy bike for commuting, weekend terrorizing, or even the occasional century is what your after, then definitely go for it! I did! First and foremost, skinny tires are a must. There are ...


5

You may or may not be able to make that conversion with your existing brake/frame combination. Your brakes will have to reach farther because a 700c wheel is a smidge smaller than a 27 inch wheel. Depending on your setup, that may be possible. I'd recommend borrowing a 700c wheelset from someone to see if you can line it all up. If it all lines up, great. ...


5

I don't see much point in "improving" the bike until you decide what improvements you need. About the only thing I can think of that you might want to change right off is the tires, if they're heavily lugged (which I can't tell from the description) and you prefer road to off-road riding. And, of course, you may find that a different seat would suit you ...


5

No, it is not a good idea. You'd be spending more than the bike is worth even for a basic internal gear hub (even assuming you got the wheel rebuilt for free using the existing rim and spokes, if possible), let alone buying a rear wheel with an IGH built in. You do need a chain tensioning pulley or horizontal dropouts, which while can be built more robustly ...


4

Yes it can be done, but more than likely you will need to buy new brakes as well unless yours will adjust to the 700 wheels. You will also need to find 700 wheels that will have the correct number of rear cogs for your existing derailleur system, or get ready to upgrade that. So, it can be an inexpensive change, or costly depending on your bike and what ...


4

I am in the same situation and I was much happier after I picked up some more appropriate tires. I went with a set of Serfas Drifters, which actually have an inverted tread so that you don't have to worry about going off road if you want. I even use them quite a bit for light trail riding. As long as you can avoid mud, loose uphills, etc you are fine. It ...


4

Without being able to get a larger frame, your brothers suggestions are about the best you'll be able to do. Do you feel to compact on the bike (arms/hands feel close to your knees when pedaling)? pushing the seat back and longer stem will allow you to stretch out. You can purchase a longer seat post if needed, they even make offset seat posts that would ...


3

It can be improved, a pair of club roost cross terra 1.5" tires, and a pair of bar end set inside the grips @ 16" apart, the need to be level to the ground. You want a bunch of your upper body weight toward the front of the bike. The covers the two biggest factors, friction on the ground and body position improving aerodynamics. Think of the bar ends as ...


3

True the brakes may be an issue. The other problem you will encounter is different spacing on the hubs. Usually you can spread the fork and frame to fit. Borrow some 700s from a friend or stop by your LBS to test fit a set of wheels. You'll know very quickly that way.


3

Hydraulics for your drop bar bike might be difficult to acquire. I believe that someone made a cable actuated hydraulic brake ... it was downright terrible. The clamp on adaptors are in my experience a nightmare. They allow for greater vibration and therefore terrible noises. First, check your bike for disc tabs. If it doesn't have them you could have ...


3

If your front and rear cogs are inline, the most likely reason that it keeps popping off is that the chain is not tight enough. For me, simply pulling the axle as far back as it will go and tightening the nuts is not enough. I don't use a chain tensioner, I use the wheel as a lever to tension the chain. How I Tighten My Chain Seat the chain. Looking ...


3

Most likely you do not need a larger cog. If you need more tension and you're out of drop-out space, you probably need a shorter chain. You may need to remove a link or use a half-link. Otherwise, David's suggestions are all recommended. Check your chain-line, chain & cog wear and make sure your wheel is tightened adequately.


3

The difference between 700C and 27" is pretty small. The rims are 622mm and 630mm so the actual change in brake shoe position is 4mm (less than 1/4"). Look at your brakes and decide whether they will suit. You may be able to change the brakes to ones with longer arms (assuming caliper types). Another issue may be the rear hub as these have got wider over ...


3

The first thing you should be looking into is gearing to ensure that an internally geared hub will work for you! The more you pay, the more gear range you get out of a hub, but even the nicest internally geared hubs don't match the spread of standard mountain bike gearing. If you've decided that an Alfine 11 hub is for you then to answer your questions in ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible