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20

The most important thing is to make sure your core temperature is high enough. As your body begins to chill, it pulls blood away from the extremities, to maintain its core temp. Often times cyclists will think "my core temperature feels fine, but my hands are cold" so they think they need warmer gloves, when in reality they need another ...


9

Look for gloves made with a Windstopper material. I have some pretty thin gloves made with this and stay warmer then my thicker gloves because they stop the wind so well. You may want to look at lighter weight running gloves made with this as I find them a little more pliable. Most I have seen are not waterproof though.


8

They'll never provide as much insulation as ski gloves, on their own - they're not designed to. They're intended to block the wind (so minimising the convection heat loss due to high airflow) but still allow you to breathe (which implies you still get the heat loss due to evaporation). A wicking/insulating liner underneath will add some straight insulation ...


5

Probably you are looking for bar mitts (pogies). HOWEVER -- until recently I wanted to buy them, 4 months ago I had a nasty accident in comfortable conditions, just pure bad luck, that's all. From that point on I said "no" to any device that attaches me to the bicycle -- the reason is, in case of accident it is a split of the second, when you can fall on ...


4

I commute (cycle) for 60 minutes each way. I wear summer (thin and fingerless) cycling gloves in temperatures down to about 40F (5C). At 50F (10C) I'm wearing a short-sleeved shirt, and short pants, as well. I'm totally relying on the extra heat I generate (from exercise) to stay warm. You must adjust your clothing to match, not only the outside ...


3

It seems as though you have a different tolerance for cold than the "average" rider. This can be caused by a lot of different things. For example, I frequently notice the difference between myself and others since most of the state is very warm (Phoenix, Tucson, etc, where 75f is coat weather), while I am acclimated in an area where 60f is a nice day. As ...


3

I wear a Gore-Tex jacket (which I bought from MEC a decade ago, not cycling-specific). It has a zip and keeps my core dry and warm, e.g. for an hour of cycling in a few mm / hour. If it's very heavy rain, then I'll be soaked, but still warmish (it remains wind-proof). A layer or two of cotton and/or poly and/or wool between my skin and the jacket. It ...


3

I picked up the Derecho - the reflective material is awesome, but I ride hard/am a sweater cuz the inside is always wet (15 KM commute, round trip). Been working with the cuffs & vents to no end... Haven't had horrible rain to see how it stands up but I have to pull the arms inside out to get it to dry in a reasonable amount of time. I've since picked ...


3

I also live in Ottawa, and the last week I've been wearing this MEC Cycling Jersey, along with another regular jersey and a cotton white T undershirt underneath. This has been sufficiently warm for my 20 minute commute. My arms get a bit cold, because they only have 1 layer, so I think I may pick up some arm warmers if it gets too much cooler, but I don't ...


2

I like that MEC jackets in general. But as you note, you will often get pretty sweaty with anything that does not vent hugely. Even in the most expensive GoreTex jacket you are still going to get sweaty. I am not convinced there is any actual great solution. There are just a series of lesser evils. MEC used to have a jacket long discontinued, and I ...


2

If you check any local outdoor retailer(basspro shop,cabellas,ems,dicks sporting goods) etc.They sell chemical hand warmers.They are basically a pouch filled with iron filings that heats as the pouch is exposed to the air.They will last about 10 hours(ride to work and ride home time for most of us).They cost about one dollar US. Place the pouch on the back ...


1

One option I don't yet see between the excellent answers above is this: If you have fixed the wind issue you still lose a lot of heat in your hands through your handlebars. The rubber grip usually provides some insulation, but the metal of your handlebars is highly heat-conductive and constantly getting cooled by the entire bike. So in cold weather you are ...


1

First off, get some "glove liners". These are thin polypro gloves that go under other gloves, either regular cycling gloves or heaver winter gloves. They provide an extra layer of insulation, and, in addition, you can remove the outer gloves and leave on the glove liners while working on the bike -- they're thin enough that they don't interfere with ...


1

There have been excellent answers already, and I agree with most of them, specially the physiology of Prototoast, the pros/cons pointed by Macias, and the windstopping need pointed by Glenn (+1 for them). I have used some gloves which were terrible, although thick, because they don't stop the wind. Thick knitted gloves are the perfect example. Currently, ...


1

You might want to try to get some Pogies. These cover your hands and the bars, and can help a lot in keeping your hands warm.


1

It's really quite a personal decision, to be honest. What works for me may not work for you. I ride year round and on many rides, my friends look at me like I'm crazy for wearing so little. Yet, I am burning up in even that sometimes. The single best thing you can do for yourself is get clothing that is somewhat modular in nature. For instance, having a ...



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