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4

Copper paste and TiPrep are the same thing. TiPrep is a bicycle specific branding. You can buy copper paste anti-seize at an auto parts store in much larger quantities for a far cheaper price. Zinc works, too. It's the same idea, with a different metallic substrate in the paste. It, a different color, which can be beneficial, depending on our frame color. ...


4

Yep, "raw" aluminum develops a layer of corrosion fairly rapidly. Thankfully, unlike with iron/steel, the corrosion is "tight" and eventually develops to a thickness where additional corrosion is prevented (in normal circumstances). The corrosion can be prevented by either coating the aluminum with a lacquer-like coating or "anodizing" it. Anodizing is a ...


4

No, it wouldn't work as long as the frame is not hermetically sealed to keep water from entering (I don't know why manufacturers don't do that). The silica gel can only absorb a tiny quantity of water, a drop or so per packet, then it becomes ineffective. It is only effective to absorb water vapor. You can bake it in the oven to regenerate it. If you want ...


3

The problem I had was getting the ammonia to the corrosion. I hung the bike upside down by both tires so the seat post was vertical. You can either remove the bottom bracket or as I did the bottle cage screw and fill the seat post with straight ammonia. If possible plug the hole so the ammonia doesn't evaporate. I let it hang for 2 days. I then laid the bike ...


2

If your frame isn't pierced through, I wouldn't bother with it much. Apply some paint of correct type (I'm no expert, consult your local home improvement/paint shop) to stop further corrosion. You might want to remove the existing rust with a fine sandpaper before putting the paint on (again, refer to the manual of the paint or consult the shop). I think ...


2

I have an identical problem, having been rinding the bike without seat clamp for more than two years now. I suppose you have already read something about it, if not I recommend Sheldon Brown on the subject. But I must warn you that the ammonia theory didn't work for me, and I tried ammonia on some aluminum sample parts without any visible effect (corrosion, ...


2

What the other Dan said, plus if you drop the stuff into your seat tube it will end up in the bottom bracket housing and muck up your BB bearings. It is quite unusual for frames to rust through anyway (I've only seen it on frames that have been left in the weather for years, if not decades), and if you're that concerned you can remove the BB and headset ...


2

You use the anti-seize compounds on bolts where you would normally use grease. For rotor bolts, use an ample amount of blue threadlocker (loc-tite), even on Ti bolts. It acts as a sufficient barrier between the two pieces of metal and prevents oxidation and bonding. I've done this on others' bikes as well as my own with no instances of bonding to report. You ...


1

This is surface oxidation. Freshly polished aluminium loses its sheen almost instantly, most shiny aluminium products have a layer of lacquer to mitigate against that. Scratches can appear worse than they are. You can leave it and the oxidised surface will not 'get any worse' or any deeper. There are no safety concerns here. As for tidying up the ...



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