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17

The idea used to be that a triple was just a double with an extra small, 'granny' ring (i.e. only grandmothers would need to use that one) so there was definitely some snobbery in a triple; that it was designed for those who needed a little more help. So on the club training run, you might be teased for it. (Google for 'triple granny ring' for various forum ...


15

I don't think you can make a 3x1 setup work. In order to have the chain change gears, there needs to be a mechanism to take up the slack in the chain. In a normal dual-derailer setup, the rear derailer does that. You might be able to make it work with a chain tensioner, but I'm not sure if you can find one with enough range to do the job as well as a rear ...


13

I doubt that you actually managed to screw your pedals into the wrong sides. If it can even be done, the amount of force required to do so would have easily alerted you that you were doing something dreadfully wrong. Not to mention the aluminum shavings that would have been all over the place. Pedals can get pretty snug just through the action of peddling ...


13

While pro riders often change gearing or whole bikes depending on the nature of the race or the stage, you do sometimes see compact cranksets, particularly among domestiques in mountain stages or races. A big-name example is Tyler Hamilton in the 2003 Tour De France. After crashing and breaking his collarbone before the huge mountain stages he was unable ...


13

As the others have stated, there's nothing wrong with any various drive train types (triple, double, 1x, single, etc). Compact drivetrains and triples are becoming more common because they provide an easier set of options for casual riding. A traditional double for a road bike may be more than most people want for casual riding. For example, if you take a ...


12

Obviously, the simpler the better, and a triple is a little, er, "crankier" to maintain and use than a double. But on most bikes it will mean that you have both a slightly larger large gear and a significantly smaller small gear, in addition to having closer "jumps" between gears. Exactly how this all will work out depends on the manufacturer's choice of ...


11

There are bicycles with a crankshaft that runs through the rear axle. The "Tur Meccanica Bi Bici" is such a bicycle: I can't tell from your picture if it's the same bike or not, but it certainly could be.


10

I don't like to be the bearer of bad news, but I've been down this road once or twice. As a hobby, I sometimes pull bike frames out of dumpsters and rebuild them to sell for my cost on Craigslist. I have learned over the years that bicycles, when new, really cost at least $300-400. "Bicycle-Shaped Objects" (BSO's) are sold at stores like Wal-Dart and ...


9

This is actually a matter of the force multiplication that each chainring provides, and the size/mass of each chainring. Force difference Let's propose, only for a moment that you had a chainring as big that the radius of it is almost the same as the crank length. If the rider stood to pedal while using that chainring (and using simple platform pedals). ...


9

Ultimately it's a trade-off between a wider range of gears and bigger jumps between those gears. There will always be uphills that are too steep for your lowest gear and downhills where you spin out. If you try to fix both problems with a wider range cassette (your triple already has a great range) you may find that you're never quite in the "right" gear ...


9

You must use a Crank Arm Puller tool: Park Tools Crank Arm Puller Here's how to use it: Video


8

You're right, you want to space it between the shell and cup. You can put spacers on either side to get the chainline right. Most cranksets come with spacers (2.5 mm is probably the most useful size for you) but if yours didn't any LBS should have a few to sell you. Something like this: http://wheelsmfg.com/bottom-bracket-spacer.html (I don't know if ...


8

Without seeing any pictures, I think you'll likely want to replace both, but you can figure it out easily enough. Usually, the bottom bracket will be fine after a crank improperly coming loose. The bottom bracket spindle is typically made out of a hard steel and only the most miserable metal cranks are made from anything other than aluminum, so when the ...


8

The lock nut is used to wedge to crank on the bottom bracket spindle. If you open it, you should still not be able to get the crank off, at least not easily. For square tapered bottom brackets, usually you have to use a tool called a "crank puller", which is hold in place with the outer thread. See this article over at Sheldon Browns for details and very ...


7

This is a common setup for many freeride bikes, as it allows uphill peddling and a bash guard. However only certain models of chain guide support this, and the one your son has doesn't officially (though it wouldn't hurt to try if you have crankset to test, might affect derailleur...). The DRS is eThirteen's 'official' dually chain guide.


6

Papuass is correct - take it back to the shop as it is under warranty and they may have offered you a free service anyway. Here is the complete checklist for future reference... I believe that you have a Shimano Altus chainset - a pressed steel number with no chainring bolts to come undone. As for diagnosis, you are not getting the click when you are ...


6

In the 2010 Giro, on the Plan de Corones, Vinokourov rode an 11-32 cassette to 8th place (with compact (34) up front). Gadret rode the same setup to place 3rd on the stage. http://www.theroaddiaries.com/?p=2726 Contador used a compact and a large, I think 30-something rear cog, on l'Angliru in the 2009 Vuelta a Espana. Compacts are definitely used by ...


6

Good question! There are a couple important reasons for the differing materials: Wear: Steel lasts longer than aluminum, plain and simple. So why not use steel on all the rings? The larger rings have ramps on the sides that facilitate shifting and cannot be flipped as the ring wears. The granny ring can, therefore it can last a lot longer. Flexion/Bending: ...


6

The positive of a triple crank is a greater range of gears. A triple crank will give you a lower low gear which may be useful for climbing steep hills. The negative of a triple crank is weight. You have an extra large gear which will likely weigh around 8 or 10 ounces. Since those ounces are on a part of the bike that rotates, they matter. So if you ...


6

All chains are the same link length, but there are different widths. Some single speed components require a 1/8 inch chain, while the chain that come with your bike is probably 3/32. You will have to get a new chain or exchange the chaining for one that fits your chain.


6

Yes, there are no complications with running a 9 speed crankset on an 8 speed drivetrain. You can see image below that some 9 speed cranks are even listed as being 9/8 speed cranks. You shouldn't encounter any problems, but you will have you readjust your front dérailleur to make room for the larger ring, and double check your chain length on big rings after ...


6

The proximate answer is that your shoes at the closest point, are too close to the crank arm, but that hardly solves your problem! This distance is affected by a large number of factors: your cleat position, pedal axel length, pedal float, bottom bracket length, and crank arm construction. Pedal float becomes a factor if you heel-in during your pedal ...


5

Sram apex is a double chainring crankset which uses a GXP (aka Giga-X-Pipe) bottom bracket which is an external bearing bottom bracket. I think External Bearing or Outboard bottom bracket are both commonly accepted terms, however there are several different incompatible types of external bottom brackets such as hollowtech, GXP, and Ultra Tourque.


5

There aren't many options out there for cranks shorter than 165mm. Your best bet is to buy a set of longer crankarms and get them shortened at a service like Bikesmith Design. Also, if you are legitimately having knee problems, I'd suggest that you find a professional fit service in your area and have a fitting done. The length of your cranks may not be the ...


5

Drilling a crank that old is not a great idea. They weren't that strong to begin with and 40+ years of use hasn't made then any stronger. I would not do anything to further weaken them. To be honest, if the pedals are frozen I'd think twice about using that crank. Aluminum corrosion expands and can create stress that crack the material ( similar to the way ...


5

A 12-27 cassette would give you a slightly wider spread of gears. Depending on your drivetrain you might be able to fit a 11-32 MTB cassette, though you'll probably need an MTB rear derailleur too. The jumps between ratios on wider cassettes can be annoying, though.


5

The crank you point to would probably fit on your bottom bracket, but might result in a bad chainline. There are two things to consider when replacing your cranks: the interface between the cranks and the bottom bracket, and the distance from the centerline. Your old Suntour cranks and the Shimano you link to both use a JIS square taper. So the interface ...


5

The crankset is not wireless, the power meter inside the crankset is wireless, the power meter inside measures your power output and wirelessly transmits the data to a head unit for display near or on your handlebars.


5

By "non-drive" I assume you mean the left side. This is more apt to come loose than the right because of "precession" -- most crank bolts are right-hand thread on both sides, but the motion of the crank arm relative to the shaft tends to loosen the bolt on the left side, whereas it tends to tighten the bolt on the right side. But if this is occurring it's ...



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