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1

I've had similar problems (clicking on the right side down stroke) before, and it is probably the bottom bracket. But the first thing to do is to check and make sure that you don't have a loose bolt/ nut somewhere. This could be in your pedal, the crank, or somewhere else in your drivetrain. If you make sure that everything is tight and it still doesn't ...


1

As others have pointed out, it's probably not so much bent but cross-threaded. The threads fatigued because the shoulder on the pedal shaft wasn't seated on the crank arm. If you keep riding it as-is (not suggested) the pedal will fall off all by itself! One thing in your favor: judging by the ~3mm gap between the shoulder and the crank arm, you might have ...


2

I've had something similar (but more dramatic) happen and I lost the crank arm. It seems to be made of softer medal, luckily, than the pedal, which was absolutely fine and I still use. Crank arms are pretty cheap when compared to pedals anyway. The damage may all be to the crank arm. I agree with Batman, the crank arms is probably a write-off. But it's ...


1

Hit it with a bigger wrench. Right side should have normal threads. CNC Pedal Rod I would try a bigger wrench before drilling it out. You have to drill exactly in the center. You will need a press. If the pedal bent there is a pretty good chance crank was damaged. If the threads are just marred up a bit you might be able to clean them up by running a ...


4

Generally speaking, when a pedal works its way loose and is ridden for a decent amount of time, it does strip (and thus ruin) the crank arm. The only way you can be sure that the crank arm is good is to inspect it. So I'd guess your crank arm is damaged (especially if its at the point where you can't loosen the pedal). A picture of how its bent in would be ...


5

Believe it or not in the range of lengths you are looking at there is very little scientific support for there being any real discernible differences in performance (both in absolute power and metabolic efficiency). For the lengths you are considering I would suggest this is largely a personal preference choice. Crank length and maximal power If we are ...


0

First, consider this; can you spin out the 50t? If not, there isn't anything to be gained by going to a larger chain-ring. At a cadence of 90rpm and a 50t x 11t will yield over 32mph & a speed of about 42.5mph could be attained with 120rpm. Even with 50t x 13t & 90rpm, the speed would be close to 28mph. If you make the switch, you may find the front ...


4

Should work fine, assuming the BCD on the 105 52t chain ring is also 130 mm (and not 110 mm - compact). The 105 chainring will be profiled ever so slightly thinner for the 10 speed chain, but will not affect 9 speed performance. Make sure to orient the new ring in the correct position with the small metal tab (that catches an errant chain) pointing toward ...



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