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I have ridden several thousand kms on full 9-speed Campagnolo Veloce setup and more than 10k with otherwise same components but 10-speed Chorus crankset. In my experience the mismatched set works far better than full Veloce 9 and does not have the problems described by Graeme. That being said, I'd pick the 10 speed one since difference is smaller. My guess ...


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The Centaur 10s crank will give you the closest-to-original performance but the problem areas are all around the width and overall design of the chain. Whilst the post fromFred above is true insofar as it states that the external dimension of the chain is different, it neglects to say that because of that width difference, in addition to a difference in ...


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that happened to me many years ago when my rear QR broke.


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If you have a bike you can ride now, I'd suggest putting its gear configuration into an online gear calculator (I'm kind of fond of this) so that you can see the ratios and spacings of a bike you've ridden and compare them with the options you're considering for your new bike. For me, I'm most interested in a gear that feels good for cruising on the flat ...


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Some math: the bold numbers are turns of the rear wheel per turn of the crank. 39/52 crankset: with 11-25 cassette: from 39/25 = 1.56 to 2/11 = 4.73 with 12-28 cassette: from 39/28 = 1.39 to 52/12 = 4.33 with 12-30 cassette: from 39/30 = 1.3 to 52/12 = 4.33 34/50 crankset: with 11-25 cassette: from 34/25 = 1.36 to 50/11 = 4.55 with 12-28 ...


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The replacement of the 9 speed Shimano road RD with a 9 speed Shimano mountain RD is fine -- the cable pulls are the same. You'll need to re-size (i.e. put on a longer) chain for the bigger cassette though. As for the crankset swap, I think with the new cassette it isn't going to be necessary. In any case, the Sora FD-3403 (which is what you likely have) ...


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AFAIK all today's 105 and up Shimano cranksets are Hollowtech II, so when replacing your old you need to exchange the bottom bracket with bearing cups. You need to figure out what kind of bottom bracket shell you have and whether replacements even exist (only BSA68 and Italian are available). They are much better than old cranksets (easier to install, ...


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The Miyata 1400a is made of aluminum. A 7 speed Shimano 105 system uses a rear spacing of 126 mm, which is smaller than the 130 mm needed for a modern 8-10 speed system. For a steel frame, its no problem to stretching the frame and get the wheel in. On an aluminum frame, you really shouldn't. That being said, people have done this at their own risk, by ...


2

The Park Tool CWP-7 is the tool for this job. Remove the outer cap using an allen key and then install the CWP-7. There is no need to tighten it ultra hard. Then use an allen key on the CWP-7 and start tightening the bolt. The extractor will "penetrate" the crank and the crank arm will start detaching itself from the other crank arm which also has the ...


4

There are two ways you can do this. Stand behind your bike. Hold the spindle out in front of you in such a way that you can read the little figures that are stamped in the middle of the spindle. This is the way the spindle goes into your bike. If you could see through the bb shell, you would be able to read the text on the spindle each time it spun around. ...


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34/50 is a standard combination, so 34/48 should work without problems. Friction shifters just make it easier to overshift and trim on the fly.


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Check out the IRD Defiant wide range double crankset http://store.somafab.com/irdwicorodoc.html) It has a 94bcd which allows it to run 46x30 rings. Combine that with a 12-27 cassette or freewheel and you'll have plenty of range. Going to a triple presents a few problems: They don't shift as well as a double. You have a short cage rear derailleur so max ...


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This is probably more complicated than you think it is. This depends on your bike. A lot of bikes which are spec'd with say 42t front chainrings for the big ring can't clear a 50t big ring in the front without the chain interfering with something. You'll also have to worry about chain line and possibly installing something to prevent the chain dropping. ...


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Here you have a compatibility chart for Race Face cranksets. Chain rings are not as standardized as cassettes and hubs for example, but you usually have a fair choice of inter-compatible components across different brands.


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You probably don't need to purchase a new crankset. You can remove the the rings you don't need and simply add a new ring. You'll need to know the distance of the bolt holes of your current chainrings/crank. This is known as the BCD (bolt circle diameter) and you can usually find it stamped on the chainring. Common sizes include 130mm, 110mm, 94mm, etc. ...


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I had this problem with a pair of Race Face Cadence cranks (road version). I think Race Face does this to force you into buying their chain rings. I am sure there is some "engineering" argument why their rings are more compatible with their cranks, but frankly their rings are only so-so (my opinion). So far every brand I have tried has this conflict as ...



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