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1

Tap tap tap tap tap. And then tap tap some more. If this is what I am thinking of you either tap the inside of the chainring from the non drive side. Or you tap the spindle from the drive side which should push the spindle through the chainring and bottom bracket. Or a little of both. Tap tap with a wood block. Greasing before install goes a long way ...


0

For the rear, a 9 speed Sora brifter will be fine -- 9 speed cable pull is the same between Shimano road and mountain. For the front, the bike has a Shimano Altus front derailleur. You'll need to swap a road triple front derailleur for that (make sure to check the spec sheet to ensure your crankset's chainring sizes are within spec (not a problem) and the ...


0

I have a campagnolo 10 speed set up i was looking for a same but semi compact and could only find in 11 speed so fitted new 11 speed semi compact so as riding i was getting odd creaking sounds through the carbon frame to my saddle thinking the bars on saddle was the problem . I continued to check gears etc. So in the end i put my existing 10 ...


0

See this answer. So long as the BCD (bolt circle diameter) and bolt pattern (4 bolts, 5 bolts) matches up between the cranksets, you can swap rings between cranksets. For example, if you have the Ultegra compact and got the Dura-ace regular double, the BCD's will be different and you can't swap them. However, if they are both compact or both regular ...


4

You can try to helicoil the crankset. This is an insert which can be used to repair threading, though you need some special tools to do it. Your bike shop may or may not have this as an option. They may charge you as much as dropping in a new SRAM S100 crankset for this. The crankset uses a Powerspline BB (which means if you to keep the BB, you're going to ...


0

Do you have a crank that's easy to replace, like Shimano Hollowtech 2? It's actually easier to exchange those than chainrings. I usually ride a road-compact (50,34), but for long tours around the alps I exchange them for a MTB one (44,34,24). I have a non-indexed front-shifter, so I don't need to change settings. Triple crankset axis seem to be some 3mm ...


0

If Google down for you? http://www.raceface.com/components/rings/rings/evolve-10speed-ring/Evolve 10 Speed 42t outer


3

My guess is that by the time the first bottom bracket (crank axle) was replaced the left side pedal arm was also damaged. When you installed the damaged crank arm to the new axle it worked for awhile. You are now at the point that you have a worn arm and a worn crank axle. Replacement of just one of the components will result the premature failure of the ...


-1

Agreed. Most non-elite amateurs cannot sustain rpms to use a 53x11 or even the 12 cog in a competitive ride/race. A 50x34 (or 36) w/terrain-suitable cog range makes better sense for more road riders than what is typically used. Many pro group training rides cruise 4-5 hour rides on their 53x17's at > 90 rpm. They don't live on those super-human gears the ...


0

It is possible but not straightforward. In most cases the bottom bracket is wider on a triple than a double. The front derailleur has a wider range and a different ratio. Note that a standard and compact double ALSO have different derailleurs and you must be cautious since a compact front and a triple front look the same but have different motion ratios. ...


1

Most people go the other way. Many new bikes now only come with double chain rings. And compact crank sets give almost the same gear range as triples. But it should be possible. The distance the front derailleur travels is about the same. You may need to adjust your limit screws though. And of course you need to change the front shifter to a 3 speed ...


3

The traditional 53/39 is basically what a pro would use, it's for speed as the top priority. Even some pros are using compact cranksets to help with climbing. 50/34 is the the normal next step down, but 46/30 just makes it easier again. Only drawback is that when shifting down to the small chain ring, the chain can come off. But a good derailleur should ...


0

The general answer is, "yes, you can change chainrings" – chainring is bicycle talk for the front sprocket. The more specific answer will depend on the actual crankset the bike is built with. There are some that don't make it easy to remove a chainring or where replacement rings are hard to find. To know for sure you'd want to have the bike in hand and check ...


0

This is a fairly standard looking crank, chainrings should be readily available in a variety of sizes. When I searched on the specs the pictures and listings didn't match, so you'll have to measure to be sure what you have in front of you. However, you might want to actually try riding the bike as it is, turning your legs at a fairly standard 90 rpm is ...


3

You need a large allen key, often an 8mm to tighten that centre bolt right down. It'll pull the crank arm onto the spindle and secure it. The LH-FSA-AL ring is the self extracting bolt, the internal hex bolt pushes on the back of it to pull the crank off without extra tools. That has a left hand thread so that it doesn't unscrew as the internal bolt ...


1

You'll have to wait until you get the bike & measure the distance between the holes, using this method. Then you can order the appropriate size chainring. Such as those here. Rather than trying to lengthen the chain, I would recommend you buy a new one as you will be much less likely to have a tight or bent link this way. You should not need to make ...


3

Yes, you can change the length of the crank arms. If you are going to replace crank set, you need to make sure it is compatible with your frame. There are a number of different interfaces between the cranks and the bottom bracket. Some common sizes are (many cranks will have the size stamped on the back of one or both of the arms): 165 mm 170 mm 175 mm ...



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