New answers tagged

1

I would say on this bike you can install any cheapest aluminum crankset, cheapest front derailleur and a friction (non indexed) shifter, where the crankset will be the most costly part (about 30$) and a few dollars for derailleur and shifter (each). So if you able to do the work byself you will end under 50$ for all that upgrade (but those should be done ...


3

First, regarding the crank's bottom bracket recommendation: The crank uses a square taper bottom bracket spindle, and would not be compatible with the Shimano Hollowtech II BB that may be currently in the bike. You could swap out to a BB-UN50 or BB-UN70 from Shimano in a 68x115mm size, to fix the crank/BB compatibility issue if that is the case. That ...


0

Here's another gear-inch calculator that may be easier to use: http://cycleseven.org/bicycle-gear-inch-calculator Basically, the 52/36 will allow 5% higher top-speed before spinning-out compared to the 50/34. (Many say that your aero-tuck and other factors are more important at those speeds anyway.) But on the hills, you'll find the 36 to be harder to ...


3

The "bottom bracket" assembly is loose. It may just be that it's a one-piece "cartridge" and is rattling around in the frame, or it may be that the unit is "loose bearings" and the bearing caps need to be adjusted. Or there may have been some sort of failure of the bearings. Regardless, the whole mess will need to be disassembled to a degree, and that ...


0

Looks to me like it is an american to square taper conversion BB, they look like this out of the frame if that is indeed what it is. If that is correct it may just need tightening, also if the BB shell hasn't been damaged you can just get replacement bearings from you LBS if just the bearings are bad. Either option is relatively inexpensive. Tool wise if ...


1

RaceFace makes cinch spindles in various lengths. I assume you have a version for 68/73mm bottom brackets. There's also a 100mm bottom bracket spindle option. It will certainly fit, but Q-factor might become too wide for your liking. Theoretically, you can also order a custom length spindle and spacers from some CNC manufacturer.


3

The difference is simply in the number of teeth on the chainring, and therefore the distance that the chain will travel when you turn the crank. With the standard crank you will be pushing the chain further, and therefore given the same cassette, the standard chainring will provide longer gearing than a compact, and require more power to turn. There are ...


5

50/34 with and 11/32 on the rear is going to be very spinny. For me - the range is too wide and the gaps between the gears too big. But - this depends on the kind of riding you will be doing. If you are riding the very steepest of mountains - than the 34/32 combination might be what you are looking for. Purely for fast road work - that's too wide a ...


1

JIS, short for Japanese Industry Standard, is by the far more common and is the one used by all Japanese manufacturers including Shimano. As far as I know, the only manufacturers that still produce ISO cranks are Specialites TA and Campagnolo, and the latter only for track bikes. Triple crank chainline is measured at the middle chainwheel, so you can use ...


2

The Rotor product you've linked to is supposed to be used with integrated 24mm cranksets, mostly Shimano Hollowtech ones, so that option won't suit for mentioned cranksets. As far as I know, tourney requires square taper bottom bracket and you already said that Claris needs an Octalink bb. You can use a BB30 to BSA interface adapter like SRAM PressFit 30 to ...


0

I just installed a FORCE 22 50/34 crankset on my old SRAM Force 10 spd equipped bike. Used to have SRAM Rival Crankset. I can not see any indications on why this would not work. I'm a mechanical engineer as a profession as well.. SRAM says the PC1051 chain is not compatible with Force22 chainrings, but it works fine so far. I think SRAM in this case tries ...


1

Any cranks should do, as long as you can attach two chain rings to the rear spider. My guess is that chainline is unlikely to be an issue if it differs by up to 30mm, as it's a longer run than on, say, a dérailleur system which seems to cope fine with offsets of at least 30mm. What you will need to watch is that the two chains are narrow enough that they ...


3

You can use whatever cranksets you like and have available. But tandems need either an eccentric bottom bracket on the front, OR a chain tensioner in order to set the tension on the link/timimg chain. 1.1. If you are only pootling around on the flat then perhaps the loss of the front chainring is acceptable. But any hills or a good stiff headwind and ...


2

It's definitely possible to do #1, although you need to match the bolt pattern and bolt circle diameter (BCD). That's a common change for many cyclists. If you're running both chains on the right hand side standard cranksets are all you need (this is typically why people do that) Chainline is important, and typically you would put both idler chainrings on ...



Top 50 recent answers are included