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If we use the Sheldon Brown Gear Calculator set to metres development (although any other unit will work adequately), we see that the range for a 39-53 x 34-11 system is 2.5 to 10.4 metres developed per crank revolution, yielding an overall range of 416%. The widest range options from various companies are the Shimano Alfine 11 hub, which has a range of ...


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I agree with @Mac that you may not be able to tell the difference between 103 and 107. If your current 103mm is in good shape, why not buy the new crankset and try it on the old bottom bracket? Evaluate the chainline. If it's good, you are done. If the (front) chainring is too far inboard, buy the 107mm bottom bracket.


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It will fit. If you need references: If you look at the Shimano Tech Doc, it suggests the Shimano BB-UN26 (which you can find that you can fit it in that version).


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Bottom bracket compatibility is usually determined by the crank— the manufacturer will specify a length. You can run into clearing issues using an MTB crank with a road bike or vice-versa, but that's not an issue for you. However, if you're using a road double crank converted to a single, you won't really be in the normal usage spec of the crank, and exact ...


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The most important thing to consider is your frame, not your crankset. You can make almost any crankset work for a singlespeed. Your frame needs to have horizontal dropouts so that you can tension the chain. Or you can use a chain tensioner, which is essentially the spring part of a rear derailleur. Looks like the San Jose has horizontal drops, so you're ...


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In general, there are several factors that go into a crankset: Mounting: What kind of bottom bracket do they go on? Square Taper, Octalink, etc. Are they cottered? cotter-less? one piece? Single/Double/Triple: How many chainrings do they have? Chainring Shape: Some chainrings like the Biopace are somewhere between a rounded rectangle and a circle rather ...



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