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1

Using Sheldon Brown's gear calculator at http://sheldonbrown.com/gear-calc.html and staying consistent with these values Using a triple of 53/39/30 teeth A 11-28 7-speed cassette will return 9.6-3.8 7.1-2.8 and 5.5-2.1 A 11-28 11-speed cassette returns exactly the same, but with smaller steps. Using a compact double of 50/34 teeth A 11-28 7-speed ...


3

This link says the frame has the necessary cable stops for a front shifter and front derailleur. You'll need a new crankset (you can find 9 speed+ triples or doubles pretty cheap these days). This may require a new bottom bracket as well, depending on which crankset you choose (I'd guess whats on there is just standard square taper) and the chainline ...


1

Getting though all the hype and testosterone - Compact cranks allow a smaller small chain ring as they have a smaller BCD. Modern tech means you can have a wider gap between chain rings, giving larger spread. This means modern compact cranks with wide range 11 or 12 speed cassettes can get the same gear range and stepping as a triple 7 or 8 speed with just ...


3

I'd be contacting whereever you got the bike from and raise the question of warranty - given its a brand new bike. Warranty may be void if you attempt to repair it yourself. Also, check whether self-assembly voids the warranty... some have a rider that "bike must be assembled by an authorised dealer" I think Giant has this requirement.


1

You can chase the threads back around with a thread cutting kit and you can also repair the thread with a helicoil kit. If the pedal is in and secure - you might get away with using a threadlock to keep it in place. And of course there is also the option to buy a secondhand replacement from ebay.


3

First thing to check: the left pedal uses a left-handed thread. Was it screwed in correctly? Depending on the amount of damage to the threads, it may be possible to sort-of screw it back in the wrong direction, which will damage it even more.


0

It's just an older style of BB. It's a square taper BB. Simply remove it and it should indicate width of the axle and the cup size (very likely 68mm). Then go order a Shimano BB-UN52 for less than $20 online. It'll outlast the rest of the bike. BTW, you can still find these cranksets on ebay. Good luck!


-1

Look up the model of your crankset online for its size, they rarely write it down. They are generally more or less the same size however, the only thing that changes is the length to the pedal which you will have to find on the crankshafts page. If you can't find any documentation, that's fine, measure the distance from the axle to the center of the point ...


6

There's a short answer to your question and a longer fuller answer. The short answer is that a common standard for road cranksets is 130mm BCD (bolt circle diameter). The smallest inner chainring you can use with 130 BCD is a 39 (as Kibbee has said, technically you can get a 38 tooth 130 BCD chainring although that doesn't leave much metal between the lower ...


4

Put the spacers back in and see how it feels. If it feels better and your gears a shifting well enough for you, leave them in. As @Daniel says, chainline is not as important as some believe. In a perfect world, you get the chain line right and never, never, ever, cross the chain. But just like the movie, sometimes you just have to cross the chain, and hell ...


4

Welcome to BB standards hell...... you are about to learn far more than you wanted to about bicycle gearing cranks and chain rings.....The only spec I could find on these was the 1999 model, which used a Shimano BB-UN52, 113mm spindle BB Shell Width 73mm - its pretty common and typical of that era MTB. Your idea of another crank set is a possible ...



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