Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

In the same way you train for your running you'll likely want to vary the rides you do on your bike. Bicycles offer you the same options like: Tempo ride: stay just below your lactate threshold Interval training Find a long flat section of road Go above your LT for a bit, then a little below for a bit (stay above 70% of LT) Many times this is 1 minute ...


6

First, of course, we must exclude accidents, collisions, and component failures -- these obviously can result in injury. Beyond that, in almost any physical activity it's possible to apply so much force to a muscle that you produce a muscle or tendon pull. In cycling this would be, eg, when you're climbing in too high a gear and exert enormous force on the ...


6

You probably don't want to spring for a specific time trial bike straight out of the gate - you might hate the triathlon experience, for one thing! Given that you're planning on using the bike after this events, albeit possibly with other events down the pipe, I'd be looking for something that you can get the best use of after the event. So a road bike ...


4

There's been a number of questions about how to improve once you've plateaued with your current training regime. None of them specifically deal with weight training but they are all about improving strength and endurance on the bike. The commonly accepted answers (and usually championed by wdypdx22) is Interval Training. Interval Training. It's a ...


4

This higher numbers are upgrades. Trek website Upgrades on 7.3 FX from 7.2 FX IsoZone grip and handlebar system Bontrager Race All-Weather Hard-Case tires Alloy FX Fork


3

You can get overuse injuries, but if you are careful and the bike fits well, they aren't that common. If you only ride, however, there are a lot of muscles that don't get much of a workout, so you can get some imbalances. I cycle seriously but I also lift weights.


3

There are two major risks associated with limiting your physical activity to cycling: Increased risk of broken bones - your bone density decreases due to little strain being put on them - see here for details: http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/07/01/is-bicycling-bad-for-your-bones/ Increased risk of twisted ankles - if the volume of cycling you do is ...


3

I would think that it isn't much that cycling has over running if you already are an accomplished runner but it does have it benefits. cross training would definitely help get over plateaus and would also add an element of fun into your training. hill climb rides would help stretch your endurance and give your quads a good burn. as mentioned, a cycling club ...


2

Squat is very good for leg strength. You can do it at home with weights, like your dumbbells, though 15lb is pretty light. You might want to procure a barbell to progress the weight resistance. Also, it's a good idea to check with a trainer in a gym to learn how to do it correctly. On the bike exercises are probably better if you ride less than 14 ...


2

I would recommend training with power and working with a coach. It will be faster and more efficient than trying to figure out how to get stronger on the bike than from a forum like this. ps. I currently train with power and have worked with coaches in the past. The structured workouts have definitely helped me get stronger on the bike and able to race on ...


1

I haven't heard of any people getting knee injuries from riding unless they were using a bike not fitted for their size or doing something else strange. In fact, my mother was "prescribed" bike riding after her knee replacement surgery to rebuild strength. However, I know of a few people with back problems from improper posture while riding, particularly ...


1

You can get injuries from all kind of exercices if not done correctly. You cannot get injuries by cycling (unless you crash or overdo it or have bad posture). What you can end up with though with cycling only is a weak upper body.


1

I'm going to guess that you shouldn't be looking to replace those 1500 calories immediately during the ride. Shouldn't part of your energy-to-exercise come from burning stored body-fat? And a lot of your energy, from the food you ate the day and week (not just an hour or two) before the ride? Compare your 1500+ Cal, with the 15000+ calories in one day ...


1

I don't know what you consider a "long ride" to be but I just did a 77 mile fund-raiser ride yesterday in Ohio. I averaged a little over 16mph for the entire ride. About 50 miles of the ride was into a 10-15 mph head-wind. During the ride, I probably went through 10 large bottles of water and Gatorade, a dozen energy bars, a couple brownies and a Subway ...


1

Unless you ride or race a fixed-gear or single-speed bike, the leg strength needed by a cyclist who rides a geared bike is actually quite moderate. In a physiological context strength is defined as the maximum force that you are able to produce, which occurs at close to the point when your muscles are stationary. Even most otherwise healthy non-athletes can ...


1

Bike James has a bunch of information on strength training for mountain biking, and he has also created a bodyweight workout. I've been doing his workouts for around six months now and it's made a massive difference to me, both off-road and on my daily commute. Specific exercises I would recommend are the turkish get up (amazingly relevant to cycling), and, ...


1

So....Not much. I'm currently working on one of these, an older 7.3, and it's equipped almost exactly as the 7.2 is now. Has the steel fork and the regular handlebar grips. Tires are Bontrager...Don't know which model. Nice bike, I'm considering keeping it. (I refurbish bikes for re-sale)



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible