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13

A good safe biking distance is the distance that one can enjoy the bike ride to work, get there a few minutes early to clean up or shower and after work enjoy another bike ride home and still spare some time to spend with family/ loved ones/have a life besides work and the commute. I limit my bike commute to about an hour each way.


11

I would argue that there is no limitation on distance the biggest limitation you will have will be on: Speed and Comfort over time. Speed Comfort bikes arn't made to go fast. They are designed to be ridden around in a leisurely way. Variables limiting speed include: Aerodynamics - you are sitting as upright as possible % of your speed/strength you ...


9

There are some good answers here, but none describes a pre-ride check that is both quick and covers the main problem points encountered with Citi Bikes. These cruisers are special. They are extremely heavy, they can only be ridden in short spurts, there is nearly always a dock within a 10-minute walk, and the bikes are used and abused by riders and passersby ...


8

Typically you would want to do an ABC Quick Check - the information below came originally from the League of American Bicyclists site. A = air Inflate tires to rated pressure as listed on the sidewall of the tire. Use a pressure gauge to insure proper pressure. Check for damage to tire tread and sidewall; replace if damaged. B = brakes Inspect pads ...


4

It's totally reasonable to ride such distances (and even much longer) on a Navigator. I have a 2003 Navigator back in Poland. It was my "return to cycling as an adult" bike. I've done many 30+ mile rides on it in rolling terrain. I don't think it would be much fun on a super hilly ride (due mostly to the bike's heft) but even that is doable. As people have ...


2

One of the first rides I did with my (now) wife was a 60 mile course, which she rode on a Mountain bike. It was easy to know she was with me, because the wide knobby tires made enough noise to hear from a distance. The rolling resistance had to be sky high. She wasn't happy with the ride, but she finished. After that ride we immediately shopped for a new ...


2

I'd check the following: Quick Visual Inspection Look for obvious signs of damage. In particular look at the wheels, tyres, handlebars and pedals. Really you're just checking that everything is pointing the right way. If anything doesn't look right, pick a different bike. As You Get On Stand next to the bike, grab the handlebars, and push the bike ...


2

I recommend getting a rear Shimano trigger shifter. This would mean getting both a trigger shifter and a grip because I think your current grip is designed for the Revoshift shifter. The part I'd recommend for this use is the shimano acera 7-speed trigger shifter, which costs about $15, if you're in the US. If you are mechanically inclined, it's pretty ...


2

Your cog is probably 1/8" like that PC-1 chain, so that 3/32" chain isn't going to work. Let's say you could even get it to fit in the first place, it would probably pop off at the least convenient moment, like when you're trying to stop with that coaster brake.


2

It would depend on a lot of things, such as terrain, weather, traffic etc. If you are not sure, simply ride a few kilometers and you would be in a position to guess. Safety hazards increase as you get tired, it will affect your judgment and reaction speed. You can get a guess on that by doing some trial riding. One thing that is for sure is that the more ...


2

Traffic, weather, and geography would make a world of difference. On a dry day at 68°F, 10 miles would be great. If you have to take several pedestrian bridges to cross major arteries in hot, humid weather, even 1 mile could wear on you. I do 1.55 miles with pretty-much no traffic (crossing one semi-major road to get to work), but this Florida weather does ...


1

Just had a little Google for it (town bike cruiser green) and found it it on Pinterest. The bike is a "Chubby's Custom Green Stretch Cruiser" price is $324.99. Website is www.chubbysbikes.com


1

This is not really a safety issue, but one of practicality and convenience. I commute a total of 6 miles each way, every day, rain-or-shine in a humid climate. The most important thing to consider is not the bike, but your clothing and amenities at your destination. I use a backpack and carry a change of clothes and my laptop (using plastic bags for ...


1

So far, I've come across one bike with a broken pedal, and one with a seatpost stuck at minimum height. So eyeball the pedals. In other cities, it's apparently become conventional to put the seat backwards on broken bikes. I've seen it occasionally here, as well.


1

Other answers have touched on this but not explicitly. The main safety point I would say is how you ride when you're tired. If you're exhausted and can't keep a straight line up a busy hill, don't think to look over your shoulder in time etc., that's bad and getting dangerous. tiredness can really hit your judgement and reaction times. Otherwise it ...


1

My 2010 Trek Navigator 3.0 is a quality bike capable of being ridden as far as your rear will stand. My longest single day ride was 50 miles on this bike. The gearing on the Trek is quite Low having a similar 34 tooth cassette as some mountain bikes and most certainly lower geared than most of the road bikesI've examined. In 2010, I put 1500 miles on it ...


1

After a while all shifters get a bit harder to work due to the cables drying out of lubrication, getting dirt in them and the cable strands oxidising. Replace the cable - both inner and outer - and you may get silky smooth shifting again. This could do the trick. As @thajigisup says, go to a shop and find the shifter that works best for her. 'Old fashioned' ...



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