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8

This has been done before in pretty much the manner you're describing (and its basically the same way that a decent number of commercial cadence sensors work, e.g. Garmin GSC10, which attaches a magnet to the pedal arm and uses the same type of sensor at the wheel). An example of someone doing this is this instructable. Basically, the guy attached a bunch ...


7

According to the Cateye CC-MC100W site, it supports "Tire size: 100mm~3999mm". The Velo 7 supports 100cm~299cm. 29 inch * 25.4mm/inch * 3.14 = 2313mm. So both computers will be fine. Note that "tire size" in this case means outside circumference rather than diameter. Sheldon Brown has an exhaustive discussion but the easy way to find out is a roll out ...


7

Every bike computer you'll ever use has some initial setup where you choose the units, set the time and enter either a wheel size or circumference. Cateye's take a circumference and there's a handy chart in both manuals to help you choose one, or you can measure it. Micro Wireless Velo 7


6

It depends on the bike computer. Some computers have this feature, others don't. A brief look at the manual of this computer says yours only supports one bike and you'll need to get another computer for the other bike (or recalibrate it each time you swap them). If the tire sizes are the same, you might be able to get by by just swapping the computer ...


5

I also think the answer is "it depends", but for slightly different reasons to Daniel. I think it depends on why you're cycling. If you are training, then measuring cadence can definitely be useful. In fact, there are training programmes that are based around cadence. (You're basically looking for a high value, and a steady value.) Otherwise, the ...


4

No. You're correct that there is extra cost and hassle involved in collecting cadence. The question you need to answer for yourself is: does the benefit outweigh the cost. Since you don't seem to see any benefits, the answer is obviously no. You should buy things when they fill a need, rather than buying things because they are available. As far as ...


4

Garmin do not publish the firmware or provide support for community modifications, and actually seem to be killing off the one community feature they had allowed (the ability to use non Garmin maps) in some areas. My advice - buy another device for the other bike, or just accept that navigating through 5 menus isn't really that bad:-)


3

I'm basing this on my 810 but I assume they're similar. You can create a new profile for riding on the turbo. For each profile you can select which sensors are used. If you turn off GPS and turn on cadence and speed (and HR if you have it) you can use it indoors. You might need another sensor to pick up wheel speed if you only have a cadence sensor. A ...


3

Summary: I used it a lot for a while getting started. Now I never look at it. Cadence was one of the primary features I was looking for when getting a computer for my road bike. I bought one of the nice Bontrager wireless models where the speed sensor and cadence sensor are all in one piece on the left chainstay. (not advocating wireless, it's just what I ...


3

It's only worth going up a notch if it's a feature you'll use. Use: I use cadence all the time. It's the primary information I use on a bike computer while I'm riding. My speed? As fast as it should be for the grade, wind, and my condition. My distance? Not home yet. The efficiency of my muscles and mechanical structure through the knees? That's ...


3

I have had a similar problem and solved it by using a small piece of foam pipe insulation. I see no reason why a piece of sponge or similar material wouldn't work. I used two zip ties to hold the spacer in place, then positioned the sensor pick-up.


3

I have been using Cateye Mity 8 for my 2 bikes. It has a dual bike function, where you can select Bike A or Bike B. Upon setting up, you can specify the tire sizes for respective bikes. Odometer count is for the total mileage done on both bikes. However, there is a trip meter which tells you the distance for the current trip, independently for Bikes A and B. ...


2

update After watching the installation video on the Sigma web-site, understood that the gap was too big between sensor and the magnet. So the sensor shouldn't parallel to the wheel, but pointing towards it -


1

There are a few ways you can do the magnet sensing: Reed switch (a switch which physically closes with a magnetic field). If you swap the two wires, the sensor will work fine (i.e. it doesn't matter). You can test for this using the continuity tester mode of your multimeter (you'll have continuity if the magnet is near the sensor, and open circuit with ...


1

I have a GPS/watch/activity tracker/HR computer that I wear on my wrist. It will connect to the two cadence sensors I have on two different bikes, but measure speed/distance/HR on ANY bike I ride. The newer wrist enabled GPS/HR stuff is spendy, but much more flexible than older style setups using a computer designed for X number of bikes. It also connects ...


1

If the tyre sizes are the same there is no reason you can't just get a second wiring kit and swap the computer between bikes. The computer won't distinguish which bike you rode but you'll be able to keep track of total mileage. A wiring kit like this would do the job: (for example, from fawkes cycles) If you have different sizes of tyre on each bike ...


1

I have a Garmin 510 unit with a GSC-10 speed/cadence sensor. If you don't already have a seperate cadence sensor installed, a combined speed/cadence sensor like the GSC-10 from Garmin (or any other ANT+ sensor from other manufacturers) is the easiest. Just pair the sensor to your unit as per manual and you're good to go. However, you should realize that ...


1

It depends on the unit. Cadence is good to have, if you want to do any sort of training, but cadence is often poorly implemented. In fact, I'm not aware of ANY good computers with cadence at present. The old Cateye Micro was excellent, but it's not been available for 15 years or so. If you get a unit with cadence you want to be sure it has a SEPARATE ...


1

I love my Edge 500 and just use the GPS, no sensors needed, I get speed and distance and a great map after uploading, just no cadence (I am aware that the speed/cadence sensor does give better speed/distance but I like the ease of using the device on all my bikes without having to buy and pair extra sensors). As far as GPS signal, I turn it on and set in a ...



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