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I also think the answer is "it depends", but for slightly different reasons to Daniel. I think it depends on why you're cycling. If you are training, then measuring cadence can definitely be useful. In fact, there are training programmes that are based around cadence. (You're basically looking for a high value, and a steady value.) Otherwise, the ...


3

It's only worth going up a notch if it's a feature you'll use. Use: I use cadence all the time. It's the primary information I use on a bike computer while I'm riding. My speed? As fast as it should be for the grade, wind, and my condition. My distance? Not home yet. The efficiency of my muscles and mechanical structure through the knees? That's ...


3

No. You're correct that there is extra cost and hassle involved in collecting cadence. The question you need to answer for yourself is: does the benefit outweigh the cost. Since you don't seem to see any benefits, the answer is obviously no. You should buy things when they fill a need, rather than buying things because they are available. As far as ...


2

Summary: I used it a lot for a while getting started. Now I never look at it. Cadence was one of the primary features I was looking for when getting a computer for my road bike. I bought one of the nice Bontrager wireless models where the speed sensor and cadence sensor are all in one piece on the left chainstay. (not advocating wireless, it's just what I ...


1

It depends on the unit. Cadence is good to have, if you want to do any sort of training, but cadence is often poorly implemented. In fact, I'm not aware of ANY good computers with cadence at present. The old Cateye Micro was excellent, but it's not been available for 15 years or so. If you get a unit with cadence you want to be sure it has a SEPARATE ...



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