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8

This has been done before in pretty much the manner you're describing (and its basically the same way that a decent number of commercial cadence sensors work, e.g. Garmin GSC10, which attaches a magnet to the pedal arm and uses the same type of sensor at the wheel). An example of someone doing this is this instructable. Basically, the guy attached a bunch ...


6

It depends on the bike computer. Some computers have this feature, others don't. A brief look at the manual of this computer says yours only supports one bike and you'll need to get another computer for the other bike (or recalibrate it each time you swap them). If the tire sizes are the same, you might be able to get by by just swapping the computer ...


1

If the tyre sizes are the same there is no reason you can't just get a second wiring kit and swap the computer between bikes. The computer won't distinguish which bike you rode but you'll be able to keep track of total mileage. A wiring kit like this would do the job: ...


1

There are a few ways you can do the magnet sensing: Reed switch (a switch which physically closes with a magnetic field). If you swap the two wires, the sensor will work fine (i.e. it doesn't matter). You can test for this using the continuity tester mode of your multimeter (you'll have continuity if the magnet is near the sensor, and open circuit with ...



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