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34

You can absolutely ride road on a cx bike. Many of the components are actually road components, including the wheels, so slap a pair of 700x23's on the stock wheelset and off you go. Things to consider: 1)Cross bikes are going to be a little heavier than a road bike in the same price range- probably a couple to a few pounds. Ultimately not that big of a deal ...


14

TL:DR Get the CX Bike, you'll love it! You get three bikes in one, without trading in any noticeable performance on the road. This answer is subjective and based on personal experience, you have been warned: I have a CX bike that is used as a do-it-all bike, and I love it. For almost all aspects that concern any non-professional cyclist a CX is as good, or ...


12

If you have the budget for only one more bicycle you cannot go wrong with a cyclocross bike, you will be able to race CX in the fall (typically after triathlon season) and you can get some fenders and slick tires for road rides in winter/spring and take the fenders off when the weather turns nice for Triathlon season. You can get clip on aero bars if you ...


10

There are a few very good answers on here already, however, I feel that a few pointers have been overlooked. Height I am not sure whether 29-ers suit all riders. Height comes into it, a 29-er imposes a high handlebar and heavier wheels than a 26" MTB. IMHO you need to be 6" or taller for the big wheel to make sense. Standover height The distance between ...


8

With a mountain bike (26" or 29") you've got Suspension: basically, suspension lets you get into more trouble. There's terrain you'd need to bail on (or crash on) without it. Flat bars: Beneficial for two things (IMO)—maneuvering and lifting the front wheel to clear obstacles. Wider bars give more leverage, which may be useful on, say, a very rocky trail, ...


8

Unfortunately there's no magic formula. A lot depends on your age and training base going into the race season. There are two things you need to balance: Intervals/speed workout. Burnout/injuries. You will see the fastest gain in the shortest time doing intervals, but you also put yourself at the greatest risk for injury/burnout. Given that you're ...


7

You certainly can use a cyclocross bike for almost everything and cyclocross bikes also make a fantastic winter trainer or touring bike. Key Differences between a cyclcoross and road bike Longer seat stays and chain stays lead to an increased wheelbase when compared to a road bike which can have a nagetive effect on cornering at speed.Cyclocross framesets ...


7

Short answer: No. Long Answer: I would not use carbon rims for commuting for several reasons: They make the bike look more shiny than you want, attracting all kinds of unwanted attention. I ride my commuter bike in any weather without too much maintenance. Should the carbon rim fail at some point, I at least won't notice a hairline crack until the wheel ...


6

Here in Belgium the Cyclocross is used a lot. The championship is a very popular winter sport, and is covered live on national television. It is specially suitable for the terrain here. Flat terrain with a lot of mud and sand. The cyclocross bike cuts through the mud, and rides on the solid undergrond of the mud, where the MTB floats on the mud. The brake ...


6

Based on comparison with the Giant Defy Advanced line, it seems to mean that you can run an electronic drivetrain (such as Shimano Di2 parts) - you have to mount things like a battery in order for the shifters to work and what not, so the frame will need to have the wiring harnesses and battery pack mounted. This link shows the TCR line in 2012 with this ...


6

Yep, I've been using such setup for an year now, on my MTB (2x10). See the "Technologies" tab on SRAM's page for X9 RD Type 2. The equivalent technology by Shimano is called Shadow+ (note the +). When purchasing an RD, on can notice, that the price difference between having or not having the relevant technology is relatively small compared to the price of ...


5

Looks like the main question you have is "what should I start doing now to get myself in shape, so that in a year I can race cyclocross?" Periodization is the Roadmap - Intervals and Hills are the Key Periodization The main principle in athletic improvement is interchanging periods of Base Building / Recovery with periods of Strength/Speed/Skill Building. ...


5

What you have to remember is that there isn't a huge difference between a cyclocross bikes and standard road bikes. Generally speaking, cyclocross bikes generally have slightly different geometry, usually burlier parts, and will always have knobby tires. It's a road bike you ride offroad. Switch to road tires and you've got a road bike. These differences ...


5

I own a 29" MTB and a Cyclocross and while I use the CX for winter commuting, trips to the zoo and riding through the park, the 29er is basically for singletrails and mountains only. I rode most of the trails I ride on the 29er with my CX, too (pretty hard work though :) ), but I HATE riding the MTB on the road. So basically I would ask myself, do you want ...


5

A typical road frame could have these issues for cyclocross (CX): tire clearance -- cyclocross tires are a bit bigger than typical road tires (especially with the small knobs typical on CX tires) brake style -- you'll want some kind of brakes that aren't clogged up by mud. Road bikes often have caliper brakes that hug the wheel fairly closely, while ...


5

A simple solution from Specialized itself to your problem could be the installation of a Tricross Fork Brake Hanger. Here is a lengthy discussion at reddit/r/bicycling about this exact same problem with the same bike: Carbon forks flex under braking. How much is 'normal'? How easily do they fracture?


5

Assuming that your rims are actually 622x15 ISO size, like the Shimano page for those rims says... According to this handy chart on Sheldon Brown's site, putting a 35mm tire on a 15mm rim is slightly bigger than recommended. It's close enough that it should be fine, however. That chart is fairly conservative (and even says so at the bottom). As far as the ...


5

A cross bike will do a little bit of everything fairly well. A triathlon bike will only do time trials. You're also going to have more options at the $1k range with a cross bike. Slim pickins at that price point for a tri bike. Get some clip on aero bars and get a cross bike. If down the road you really get eaten up with triathlon, and get a dedicated tri ...


5

I encourage replacing once there is a noticeable decline in performance (usually that means that they get "sticky"). Depending on the type of elements you go through, you might get back most of the perf by pulling the cable most of the way out, adding a drop of thin oil, then sliding the cable back through all the housing. Repeat a couple of times wiping ...


5

The main thing to watch out for is the brakes, if the comes with V-Brakes or Cantilever brakes, you should be able to run wider tires and fenders. Typical CX tires are 32-35mm and typical road from 23-28. The caliper style brakes found on many road bikes will not accommodate the wider CX tires. There are many options under 2-3K, You could even look at ...


5

Cyclocross bikes will have a slightly different geometry. More like a relaxed road geometry with a higher bottom bracket than a road bike typically. You'll be stretched out a bit less and more upright. Cross frames also will have wider tire clearances for 32mm to 35mm tires, but it varies by model as some can fit 38mm to 45mm tires. Traditionally, brakes ...


5

Cyclocross courses are (generally) too smooth and relatively fast to warrant the use of suspension. Sure, it might be more comfortable, but the added weight would only slow you down and leave you behind your competitors on a typical muddy course.


5

Many first time cross racers use a mountain bike. It makes perfect sense, don't go out and spend $1500+ before you even know whether cyclocross is your cup of tea. Most all races allow mountain bikes, the only type of equipment that's usually forbidden is a fixed gear. A full suspension mountain bike will do just fine as an introductory race vehicle. Your ...


5

One good reason to stick with cantilever is easier wheel swaps. Last weekend races, my son flatted and we did not put spare wheels in the pits. Neutral support had spare wheels and if my son had a disc based bike he would not of been able to use them. Even if neutral support had disc wheels, with differences in rotor size they may not work for your bike. ...


5

If you are going to use your bike mostly for commuting, I would like to suggest you go for cyclocross. The reasons are: Motorist Hazard: There are always ignorant motorist who think they can save a lot of time by ignoring checking blind spots, appropriate speed at junction, quickly overtake without leaving sufficient space for cyclist. The less time you ...


4

I would say 29" in mountain bikes is a buzz word indeed. If this is your first mountain bike, do not make it 29". The selection of bikes, wheels, tires are quite limited comparing to 26". Decision MTB vs. CX is entirely up to you. All depends on what do you mean by off-road. Off-road can be country roads or Alps singletrack, or downhill trails. From my ...


4

If you're not trying to be ultra-competitive, you can do a C on any bike that rolls. I've seen guys do 100 miles loaded on a Huffy. And, as I understand it, a cyclocross bike is a "more relaxed" geometry than a standard road bike (closer to a touring bike), and thus possibly more apt to be comfortable on a long ride than a road bike. Gearing might be an ...


4

I've just looked at the Centurion website and it's not clear from the pics or the German specs whether the frame and forks have caliper mounting holes. Look for a hole in the centre of the fork to take the caliper, and a corresponding one in the centre of the rear cross-brace above the wheel. If those are there you can use caliper brakes of some kind, if ...


4

So I decided to take the plunge and try the tubeless wheels. I've got about 80 miles of road and gravel riding on them now, and figured I should start formulating an answer. I ended up using the stan's alpha 400 rim because of my weight and the lack of rim brake compatibility in their cross specific rim. So far it's been as advertised. The tires can run ...


4

I think the more common strategy is to squirt spray-lube into the housings once or twice a year and only replace them when they're showing rust or other signs of being over the hill. I replace mine every 10 years, whether they need it or not. Certainly if you're replacing the tape then that's a good time to replace the cables, but I only replace the tape ...



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