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1

You might consider opting for neither and instead look for a so-called "gravel" or "adventure" bike. Both are relatively new categories, but either could be described as an "all-road" option. They're really road bikes that are meant for paved and unpaved roads. Their advantages over contemporary road bikes include more clearance for larger tires and ...


2

I had a road-bike and swapped it for a cyclo-cross. I'm never going back to a road-bike. For me, the cyclo-cross is just as fast if not faster. The cyclo-cross feels more stable and I feel like I have more control at speed so am prepared to go faster. With the wider tyres I'm not so worried about hitting a bit of rough road or a grate as it'll fly over ...


1

Another factor to keep in mind is the maintenance issue. Riding on gravel roads will flick up dirt on to your chain much faster than riding on sealed surface. You will need to do cleaning and maintenance more regularly and chain and drive train wear will occur quicker. You might find that the total amount of time (riding + cleaning/maintenance) will be less ...


1

I don't really like the title. It is more about selecting a commuting bike. A cyclocross can handle gravel and road hazards and is still built for speed. On the open road cyclocross does not give up much. For the same price level bike cyclosross would be barely heavier, little wider, and a little taller. It would also be geared a little lower. If you ...


14

TL:DR Get the CX Bike, you'll love it! You get three bikes in one, without trading in any noticeable performance on the road. This answer is subjective and based on personal experience, you have been warned: I have a CX bike that is used as a do-it-all bike, and I love it. For almost all aspects that concern any non-professional cyclist a CX is as good, or ...


5

If you are going to use your bike mostly for commuting, I would like to suggest you go for cyclocross. The reasons are: Motorist Hazard: There are always ignorant motorist who think they can save a lot of time by ignoring checking blind spots, appropriate speed at junction, quickly overtake without leaving sufficient space for cyclist. The less time you ...


1

A touring bike and a cyclosross are similar but this is where you going to find a differences. A cyclocross bike is is not going to be designed to hold a kick stand. Weight, clearance, and collect mud. They are going to open that space up between the tire and cross bar to avoid problems with mud.


1

You probably can't get a safe mount for that type of kickstand on that bike (and likely not any kickstand - the space is just too small). In general, kickstands on good new frames (even touring frames like the Surly LHT) are tricky since they stress the frame in ways the manufacturer did not intend. See this page from Surly, for example. You may want to ...


1

Professional cyclo-cross racers choose depending on the type of cross they are riding. On fast tracks or tracks with a lot of climbs they prefer cantilevers. On muddy tracks you see a lot of disk brakes. I remember there was a huge discussion about this when they first showed up in the world cup (November 2013). Below some quotes from the leading riders in ...


0

Hydraulic discs self adjust as the pads wear, which may wear significantly during a single race. I have heard that some pros have avoided switching for this reason, however I believe that the main reason they do not is that they are used to caliper brakes. I would not upgrade to mechanical (cable-actuated) discs since they will not self-adjust, and you may ...


5

One good reason to stick with cantilever is easier wheel swaps. Last weekend races, my son flatted and we did not put spare wheels in the pits. Neutral support had spare wheels and if my son had a disc based bike he would not of been able to use them. Even if neutral support had disc wheels, with differences in rotor size they may not work for your bike. ...


1

Generally, you can use any 700c trainer tire like the Continental Hometrainer , Vittoria Zaffiro Pro Home Trainer, Kurt Kinetic's Trainer tire, etc. Most come in 700x23, but some come in larger sizes (700x32 for example for the Continental Hometrainer). You can also just use a regular tire on a trainer, but the tire will wear out faster due to the additional ...


0

Look at the turbo trainer for the size wheels they support. There are turbo trainer specific tires but you can train on a regular tire. Just google "bicycle tire for turbo trainer". You have 700 rim = 622 iso. At CX races I see riders warming up on turbo trainers with the knobby tires they are going to race with.



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