Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

1) As in Scotland, I would recommend you to look for a second-hand bike (possibly gumtree is a good place to start with, bear in mind that you need to check and make sure the bike is not stolen). The reason is that in the winter, all the salt on the roads will corrode your bike badly.So go cheap, then keep it as winter bike, then upgrade gradually. ...


4

Here are the things I believe you should be considering when making the decision. Fat bikes climb just fine. Yes, a road bike will climb a paved hill more efficiently than a mountain bike under the same conditions. But, a mountain bike will also climb a muddy single track that a road bike would simply fail to move at all on. Efficiency and utility are ...


3

How much snow are we talking about? I’ve commuted through the winter on a cyclocross and had very little problems. The roads here (Austria) are usually cleared quite well, so I’ve never had deep snow. For black ice I used studded tires (Nokian Hakka W106) which — due to their narrowness (35mm) — also work quite well on slush. I’ve had the most difficulties ...


0

I still live in a 6-speed world, but… I think it would work. Do you have the tools to take the 10-speed cassette off and try it on the 11-speed wheel? The easiest thing might be just to try it. You will need a spacer behind the cassette (on the side towards the spokes).


2

Use spacers on the 11 speed wheel to put a 10 speed cassette on. See your hub manufacturer's page for details, but its normally a 1.8(5) mm spacer (which comes with the hub, but you can buy separately) and a 1mm spacer (sometimes; which you'll get with the cassette). See this page for a table of some common cases.


0

As someone who commutes with a CX bike and loves it, that bike shop employee is completely full of it. If he's seriously suggesting that you're going to corner better with a road bike in bad conditions than a CX bike he's a complete tool. What kind of tire you're using is the obvious consideration, not road vs. CX. Given that you can run wider tires with a ...


1

The Specialized will be fine in the Elite trainer. The one problem you'll find is that knobby tires don't work well on trainers such as this. If you plan to primarily ride on the road I'd strongly suggest investing in some road tires. A cyclocross bike can take some fairly wide tires so I'd suggest running 28-32mm wide tires. They'll be MUCH more ...


2

Most trainers on the market today can do 26", 29" and 700c. Specialized's cyclocross bikes are 700c, your trainer will likely be able to handle it fine, but check the manual (*). A trainer won't help you gain confidence riding in traffic though -- you'll just have to practice riding in traffic, which is the bigger problem here. (*) Your trainer may have ...



Top 50 recent answers are included