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I will try and stick to your specific questions. To adjust either type at home is possible, neither is more difficult but have different techniques. On that basis I would say to choose freely, and learn how to maintain the one you own with a good how-to book or online videos etc. Disc brakes do not stop you any faster in the dry, but do potentially help ...


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There's two different situations here. The first time disks are set up after installation can be a lot of work. The calipers need to be fixed in the right position, which can involve a special tool to shave a little off the mounts to get them square and parallel to each other, then some precise setting of the mounting adapters and positioning of the caliper ...


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As other have stated road discs are becoming more common. While hydraulic discs will give you the best performance, it comes at considerable cost. New shifters would be needed. Mechanical disc would reuse your shifters. I would put mechanical disc as a cost effective alternative. If this is an upgrade it is important to use road specific calipers. Mountain ...


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If you are going to service them on the go you'll need to learn how. When you get new set of brakes, tear them apart and put them together a few times. It may take an hour or three, but then you'll know how to fix them. Which is better is really up to your use case. Both will stop your bike when necessary. My list of issues to consider: Replacing a disc ...


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They function fine. Cyclocross bikes with mechanical discs wired to brifters are a common sight in races. However, mechanical disc brakes are in fact inferior to hydraulic disc systems and I wouldn't recommend buying a new bike with a mechanical disc setup when there are so many good hydraulic options out there. Mechanical disc calipers only move to ...


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Disc brakes - to me - are easier to maintain than rim brakes. Rim brakes take a lot of adjustments as you wear the pads. The pads on rim brakes have to be given more and more toe-in adjustment as you wear the pads to keep them working optimally. Disc brakes are far less tedious. I will not buy a bike that I am going to ride a lot with rim brakes. Six of my ...


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Another approach is to fit an older part-worn rear tyre if you're going to keep the bike in the trainer all winter. You can buy a new good tyre come spring. If your trainer doesn't spin the front wheel like rollers do, consider using up the front tyre by install it on the rear wheel and shout yourself a pair of new ones when it warms up.



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