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This does not work in the specific case of a Sram CX1 rear derailleur, or the case of any other X-Horizon™ mechanisms. I purchased the CX1 derailleur and attempted with a 46/39 front chainring combo. The CX1 RD allows the front shift to occur, but has no tolerance for changes in chain length (e.g. front shifting). The change in chainring size impacts the ...


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No, you don't need discs. You SHOULD fit decent wet weather brake pads - eg Kool Stop Pinks - and learn how to maintain cantis correctly (because most LBS's can't.) See eg http://sheldonbrown.com/cantilever-geometry.html Also make sure that you are riding tyres with good wet weather grip - it varies a lot. (Schwalbe give honest ratings for their tyres.)


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That bike is equipped with Avid Shorty 4's according to the description (contrary to the URL). Avid Shorty 4's are just regular cantilever brakes, which are standard on most cross bikes. A cantilever brake looks like this: Mini V brakes are a type of V-brake with short pull so they can be used with road levers. A mini-V brake looks like this: Note that ...


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Yep, I've been using such setup for an year now, on my MTB (2x10). See the "Technologies" tab on SRAM's page for X9 RD Type 2. The equivalent technology by Shimano is called Shadow+ (note the +). When purchasing an RD, on can notice, that the price difference between having or not having the relevant technology is relatively small compared to the price of ...


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That's some wattage, but lower than Coggan's charts for an international pro road racer (5.78w/kg+ for FTP), I guess due to: the fact that this is race data and not best efforts from testing/training; and because perhaps it's less important for cyclo-cross riders as they don't tend to do as long climbs as you might expect in a Grand Tour. Yeah, I agree ...



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