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A mountain bike is not going to be inherently stronger. If anything a larger frame triangle is stronger. On a mountain bike you have a long seat post that is a point of failure. I don't recall seeing weight limits posted for bikes. Consider a touring bike as they are designed to handle a load. Or an expedition bike. I would go with a high quality ...


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Schwalbe CX Comp or Smart Sam in ~32mm width. Low pressure is most important on gravel etc. the profile is only useful in mud etc. If it’s really light off-road you could even try a Continental 4 Season in 28mm.


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The best tires I've ever used for linking up dirt and road in the same ride are Avocet Cross II's. They had a "negative" tread. (i.e. grooves in a mostly slick tire.) Unfortunately, they are no longer made. There are lot's of choices for this kind of tire for "gravel grinder" riding, if you ever run across anything that looks like the Avocet, buy it. ...


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Clement X'PLOR USH 35mm Clement X'PLOR MSO 40mm Surly Knard 41mm I own Clement X'PLOR USH 35mm tires and Surly Knard 41mm tires. USH tires are faster than Knards, they are pretty good on gravel but not as good as Knards. On the other hand, Knards are really good on the gravel, even on MTB sigletracks. However, Knards have bigger rolling resistance on the ...


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You have to compromise. On road you want smooth and off road you want tread. On road touring or road tires. Anywhere from a 700 X 32 - 700 X 38. You get low rolling resistance and good traction on the road. Off road you want some tread. Anywhere from a 700 X 34 - 700 X 38. A small block will give you some traction but still do OK on the road. As ...


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I've ridden many different tires on my cyclocross bike, and I've found that a 32 mm is the comfortable on the road. The most fun I've had though is on 40mm Clements, especially if there's any off road involved, if you can fit them on your cross bike. https://www.biketiresdirect.com/product/clement-xplor-mso-60-tpi-adventure-tire


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I've found that slick tires can lead to unpleasant surprises on loose surfaces, such as a thin layer of gravel on top of hardpack. So I'd recommend a cyclocross tire with a decent tread pattern (a bit like a mtn bike tire). I used to have Clement Crusader PDX tires on my cyclocross bike. I liked them because they were 37mm wide, even though they are ...


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I'm not sure about the term "cross bike", which doesn't seem to be used in English-speaking countries (except as an abbreviation for cyclocross, but that's not what this bike is); perhaps it's what we call a "hybrid bike" (although hybrids usually don't have a suspension fork) Cyclocross bikes are a totally different category. They are intended for racing, ...


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I don't know why, but Merida seems to be confusing the terminology. Cross is typically short-hand for cyclocross and used interchangeably. If you told me you were looking for a cross bike I would instantly assume you mean 'cyclocross.' Cyclocross bikes, are somewhat race specific and sacrifice suspension for speed. Most cyclocross forks are going to absorb ...



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