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11

We have no way to know what may or may not have been damaged in the accident, especially without knowing details about the accident and the types of components on the bike. Some parts you likely won't be able to determine if they're still functional until you put them on a different bike and ride on them. That said, you're not going to get much by selling a ...


9

The easy way would be to get a qualified bike mechanic to take a look at your bike for less noticeable problems. It's not safe to ride a bike if the frame has been noticeably disfigured. Re-adjust the wheel to be aligned to the handlebars. The wheel tends to twist after crashes. Go through the final safety inspection you would normally go through, check ...


8

I wouldn't say that a single broken strand on a new brake cable would render the bike "totally unsafe to ride," but if it is an option you should bring it back to the shop and have them replace it. This might be a sign that whoever put this bike together or inspected it for sale doesn't have a very thorough shop ethic. If they were careless enough to install ...


7

I think perhaps you could inspect some parts and, if they show no reason to worry, you could use them yourself. But I think it would be unfair to sell some of the parts, "by definition". So, I think you should NOT sell these parts: Fork; Handlebar; Headset; Stem. These are structural parts that are vital for safety and/or are likely to be damaged in an ...


5

The joint is spanned by a spline (or two), glued or swaged into notches formed into the aluminum extrusion. It is the integrity of the spline and the fastening mechanism that is the issue. If the spline is cracked, obviously that's serious problem. Also, if the fastening mechanism has failed to the extent that there's motion between spline and extrusion, ...


5

YES and NO Depending on the type of frame and type of riding you are doing it could be a problem. YES (you might have a problem) If you have a steel frame slapping of the chain can damage the paint which is very important in keeping oxidants like water and air away from the bare steel. Steel will rust and eventually fail catastrophically. If you have a ...


4

You could sell the bike whole, for someone else to part out. But I feel that the others are being a bit anal about selling the parts. After all, many bikes are subjected to far more abuse than this TA produced. A bicycle is a remarkably robust device. The frame (obviously), the front wheel, the fork, and the headset should be tossed (though the front ...


4

I would be concerned. The bottom bracket is the most heavily stressed part of any bike, and carbon has a catastrophic failure mode--that is, you don't get any warning. One minute it seems fine, the next minute, you've got carbon-fiber shrapnel. As a first measure, I might clean it up as best as I can, take some pictures, and send them to the manufacturer or ...


4

That looks to me like an overtightened bolt. See how the cable has spread out under the bolt? That means more strands have probably been damaged. The problem is not that one strand has broken, but that more strands will break in short order. So yes, do something about it soon. If you're lucky you'll be able to wind the barrel adjuster on the brake lever in ...


3

Crank arms snap all the time. Odds are pretty good that it was an older crank and the fatigue in the metal built up enough that it was no longer structurally sound. Metals are a lot like crystals on the atomic scale, but when you repeatedly put a load on them tiny cracks begin to form and grow, until the metal is warn out and cracks. Fatigued metal is also ...


3

My guess is the alignment was like that before the accident and the reason the gears wont adjust is the derailleur hanger is bent, which is a $10 part and/or a visit to the LBS with a tool to fix it. Even if the frame has been bent, although less than ideal, it is not a safety issue and would not stop me using it - as long as the derailleur hanger can be ...


3

@Alexander is right, there is no need to break a chain when you replace a bottom bracket. So your hypothesis doesn't make complete sense, unless maybe they were doing other stuff to the bike? So if you do take the bike back to the shop, odds are that that's their response. I know if I got myself a new (second-hand) bike, I'd think about replacing the chain ...


3

Depends on what's clicking. If the bottom bracket itself is making the noise then no hurry to deal with it. The bearing may be slowly failing but nothing else will be damaged and the bearing will probably give you plenty of warning before it fails completely -- if it ever does. But if the noise (and generally an accompanying sensation) is due to the crank ...


3

If you're talking about the crack running from the opening down into the fillet, that doesn't appear to be likely to seriously affect integrity (though I'm sure there are some here who will disagree). The lug in that area is reenforced by the steering tube, so there's very little stress at that point. (In fact the crack may have been there since ...


3

The ocean is not sanitary! Especially around major cities, so if you were on a bike path, there is a good chance you are close enough to civilization to where the ocean is not good for your wounds. I grew up in a beach house in Hawaii and know that until the wound closes you don't want to go swimming, you can get it infected. Happened to my foot, frekn ...


2

The only situation in which I could see that being the case would be with a carbon MTB frame, a rider who is using it far beyond it's intent, and a poorly set up drivetrain. In that situation, you might get enough force from chain slap to ding the frame, and if repeated often enough, those dings might turn into a crack. I seriously doubt it, but it could ...


2

Generally if you're getting anything other than occasional chain slap against the stay there's something wrong. Eventually chain slap would wear away the paint on a steel frame and allow it to corrode through (if left out in the weather). Some very light/exotic frames could in theory have such thin tubing that you could wear through, but only after a ...


2

You could use a pair of these stickers. As far as I know most road cleats are plastic cleats and are not going to do significant damage to the shoe (being plastic and large rather than metal and small) so no protection is needed. (There are some road cleats which are metal, as described in comments.)


2

Sorry to hear about your accident - be prepared to take a while to physically recover even if you want to get back on the bike now. You will have the option to chase things up with the driver's insurance company, but honesty is the best policy and you should only go for the 'write off' claim if your bike is truly mis-shapen. You also have to be aware that ...


2

If your frame isn't pierced through, I wouldn't bother with it much. Apply some paint of correct type (I'm no expert, consult your local home improvement/paint shop) to stop further corrosion. You might want to remove the existing rust with a fine sandpaper before putting the paint on (again, refer to the manual of the paint or consult the shop). I think ...


2

Since this was mentioned in a comment, freewheels are not the same as freehubs+cassettes (see http://sheldonbrown.com/free-k7.html) for details. The rest of the discussion should hold if freewheel is replaced with cassette+freehub though with minor modifications - I don't know if this bike has a freewheel or a cassette+freehub since I can't load the product ...


2

You've hit the major repair options in your question. I've heard of people filling in spots on a fork stanchion before and having it work OK, so I'd assume a rim would probably work too. The only difference might come from when the rim heats up due to braking, the filler could expand/contract differently than the rim material and get dislodged again. I ...


2

Assuming that you'll never land from a jump with your pedal down on a rock, then there is not problem. On the other hand a little protection doesn't hurt. Maybe you can get those end plugs from CrankSkins. My race face sixc cranks had similar ends on. After riding hard for 1.5 years there aren't any serious dents and dints on them, but again, more ...


2

If you are not worried about cosmetics, these dents won't affect the frame at all. I had a massive dent on top tube of my Ti trials bike from bad crash. And rode the bike for years after that. And nothing happened to the frame. Titanium is very good in for this. Dents won't affect the overall lifespan.


2

I would certainly give a lot of attention to the chainring and lockring. One question that I think you need to answer is whether the lockring was loose before the incident or did the chain jamming the cog cause the lockring to come adrift. Then you need to consider whether the lockring loosened naturally, i.e. did it turn along the thread, or was it forced ...


1

Carbon fiber is a tougher material than you may think. For a carbon crankarm it's going to be thick throughout the arm and likely solid at the end as well as being reinforced by the aluminum pedal spindle insert. It will show scratches, but so will an aluminum crankset. It's nothing to worry about. If the manufacturer was concerned they wouldn't manufacture ...


1

Rust on the frame is the least of your worries. It's the moving parts you should be looking at: derailleurs, chain, bearings, brakes... Since it's an old bike, it probably has non-sealed bearings, so you should clean and repack them (if you ride regularly, you should do this once a year). Replace the chain if it looks rusty or if it's stiff. As for the ...


1

It sounds like it's only superficial damage if it's only happened since the frame's paint got damaged. If you can get it all off with steel wool then you should be fine, though you may want to look into getting the frame repainted with a good waterproof/anti-rust paint. As for the creeking, verify that the bolts holding the front fork and handlebar ...


1

Sounds like you have only surface rust. The frame would have to rust through to cause any integrity problems and that would take many years of damp conditions. The creaking you hear when shifting your weight to the bars may be the headset. It may be worth getting it serviced. As its likely the grease has escaped/become clogged with dirt causing the ...


1

There's nothing structurally wrong, but whoever put the bike together (likely at the bike shop) was a little sloppy. The bike is perfectly safe to ride, and the durability of the cable is not seriously impacted. You'd need to have about half the strands in the cable broken before its integrity was at any risk. And, contrary to what Kohi said, the bolt is ...



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