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11

The easy way would be to get a qualified bike mechanic to take a look at your bike for less noticeable problems. It's not safe to ride a bike if the frame has been noticeably disfigured. Re-adjust the wheel to be aligned to the handlebars. The wheel tends to twist after crashes. Go through the final safety inspection you would normally go through, check ...


11

We have no way to know what may or may not have been damaged in the accident, especially without knowing details about the accident and the types of components on the bike. Some parts you likely won't be able to determine if they're still functional until you put them on a different bike and ride on them. That said, you're not going to get much by selling a ...


8

I wouldn't say that a single broken strand on a new brake cable would render the bike "totally unsafe to ride," but if it is an option you should bring it back to the shop and have them replace it. This might be a sign that whoever put this bike together or inspected it for sale doesn't have a very thorough shop ethic. If they were careless enough to install ...


7

I think perhaps you could inspect some parts and, if they show no reason to worry, you could use them yourself. But I think it would be unfair to sell some of the parts, "by definition". So, I think you should NOT sell these parts: Fork; Handlebar; Headset; Stem. These are structural parts that are vital for safety and/or are likely to be damaged in an ...


6

YES and NO Depending on the type of frame and type of riding you are doing it could be a problem. YES (you might have a problem) If you have a steel frame slapping of the chain can damage the paint which is very important in keeping oxidants like water and air away from the bare steel. Steel will rust and eventually fail catastrophically. If you have a ...


6

Assuming a decent and well maintained mountain bike it can handle much more abuse than riding up and down curbs or jumping around a bit. Even the most lightweight mountain bikes will not have the slightest problem with that. However, two things are important: Good maintenance and riding technique! Riding on underinflated tires or a badly serviced suspension ...


5

Possible solutions: - Let a bike mechanic ream the seat tube slightly - Wrap some sanding paper around a broomstick or similar an grind the sharp edges


5

The joint is spanned by a spline (or two), glued or swaged into notches formed into the aluminum extrusion. It is the integrity of the spline and the fastening mechanism that is the issue. If the spline is cracked, obviously that's serious problem. Also, if the fastening mechanism has failed to the extent that there's motion between spline and extrusion, ...


5

I have repaired non structural and surface carbon blemishes with clear nail polish. I had no issues and used the handle bars for several years with no issues.


5

I would be concerned. The bottom bracket is the most heavily stressed part of any bike, and carbon has a catastrophic failure mode--that is, you don't get any warning. One minute it seems fine, the next minute, you've got carbon-fiber shrapnel. As a first measure, I might clean it up as best as I can, take some pictures, and send them to the manufacturer or ...


5

It does not look to me like the cords are damaged, which means the tire will still have its strength to hold the air pressure of the tube. You have three easy options. Personally I would take the last: Ignore it. It will probably last until the tire has no tread left. The cut itself will bulge a little, so this will be the point of failure of the tire. ...


5

It won't present any immediate danger, however it became untrue for a reason. If the spoke tension has changed more than likely it will get worse over time and riding it while out of true will most certainly expedite that process. Other spokes will lose their tension and could possibly break resulting in a higher repair bill, or possible injury. You will ...


4

Sorry to hear about your accident - be prepared to take a while to physically recover even if you want to get back on the bike now. You will have the option to chase things up with the driver's insurance company, but honesty is the best policy and you should only go for the 'write off' claim if your bike is truly mis-shapen. You also have to be aware that ...


4

You could sell the bike whole, for someone else to part out. But I feel that the others are being a bit anal about selling the parts. After all, many bikes are subjected to far more abuse than this TA produced. A bicycle is a remarkably robust device. The frame (obviously), the front wheel, the fork, and the headset should be tossed (though the front ...


4

Depends on what's clicking. If the bottom bracket itself is making the noise then no hurry to deal with it. The bearing may be slowly failing but nothing else will be damaged and the bearing will probably give you plenty of warning before it fails completely -- if it ever does. But if the noise (and generally an accompanying sensation) is due to the crank ...


4

That looks to me like an overtightened bolt. See how the cable has spread out under the bolt? That means more strands have probably been damaged. The problem is not that one strand has broken, but that more strands will break in short order. So yes, do something about it soon. If you're lucky you'll be able to wind the barrel adjuster on the brake lever in ...


4

Crank arms snap all the time. Odds are pretty good that it was an older crank and the fatigue in the metal built up enough that it was no longer structurally sound. Metals are a lot like crystals on the atomic scale, but when you repeatedly put a load on them tiny cracks begin to form and grow, until the metal is warn out and cracks. Fatigued metal is also ...


4

You've hit the major repair options in your question. I've heard of people filling in spots on a fork stanchion before and having it work OK, so I'd assume a rim would probably work too. The only difference might come from when the rim heats up due to braking, the filler could expand/contract differently than the rim material and get dislodged again. I ...


4

From looking up your bike, it's a pretty well-equipped machine. Your Rock Shox fork is going to help a lot in taking physical stresses off of your bike (and you). Obstacles like curbs, rocks, logs, fallen branches, and roots will present varying levels of difficulty to you. Since your bike has 26" wheels, it'll be more difficult to ride over things than it ...


4

If your bike is like those pictured then it's highly unlikely unless the wheel gets hit or leant on from the side. That in itself is not implausible in a crowded bike rack. Lightweight road bike wheels are another matter, they have much less lateral strength. Even they would need some sort of sideways force but much less. The big problem with these racks ...


4

These stands don't hold the bike very well because if the friction grip fails, the bike can roll/move backwards and then fall over as the steering turns. So, consider backing your bike into one instead of going in frontwards. Downside as ChrisH says is that your lock needs to go from the rack all the way to the front wheel, or use two locks. Also check ...


3

If you're talking about the crack running from the opening down into the fillet, that doesn't appear to be likely to seriously affect integrity (though I'm sure there are some here who will disagree). The lug in that area is reenforced by the steering tube, so there's very little stress at that point. (In fact the crack may have been there since ...


3

The ocean is not sanitary! Especially around major cities, so if you were on a bike path, there is a good chance you are close enough to civilization to where the ocean is not good for your wounds. I grew up in a beach house in Hawaii and know that until the wound closes you don't want to go swimming, you can get it infected. Happened to my foot, frekn ...


3

I've been advised by my local supplier of carbon fibre to use a polyurethane paint to finish carbon fibre. You can buy it in spray cans from a paint or hardware shop. Don't use paint stripper because that will damage the epoxy resin used to bind the carbon fibre.


3

My guess is the alignment was like that before the accident and the reason the gears wont adjust is the derailleur hanger is bent, which is a $10 part and/or a visit to the LBS with a tool to fix it. Even if the frame has been bent, although less than ideal, it is not a safety issue and would not stop me using it - as long as the derailleur hanger can be ...


3

@Alexander is right, there is no need to break a chain when you replace a bottom bracket. So your hypothesis doesn't make complete sense, unless maybe they were doing other stuff to the bike? So if you do take the bike back to the shop, odds are that that's their response. I know if I got myself a new (second-hand) bike, I'd think about replacing the chain ...


3

Since this was mentioned in a comment, freewheels are not the same as freehubs+cassettes (see http://sheldonbrown.com/free-k7.html) for details. The rest of the discussion should hold if freewheel is replaced with cassette+freehub though with minor modifications - I don't know if this bike has a freewheel or a cassette+freehub since I can't load the product ...


3

Yes, you can damage the frame if the seat post is too short. I have personally seen someone sit down on an overextended seatpost and fall off the bike as the seat post was wrenched out of the seat tube. The collar went flying and the top of his seat tube was mangled. His frame was titanium and he was able to bend it back. You probably wouldn't be able to ...


3

Answer: This is what can happen. Please check my question at What caused this seat clamp / frame failure? This was caused by a really long seat post installed way too far up. http://i.stack.imgur.com/1CiVW.jpg I also have a bad habit of bending seat posts at the point they enter the frame, mostly due to the leverage from being so long.



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