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0

Further to Blam's answer about the position of the pulley (which takes up the slack in the chain), my hybrid/touring bike was recently serviced by a very experienced French shop mechanic of racing bikes. He put on a chain which was too short (i.e. it pulled tight and jammed) if, when I rode it, I cross-chained it onto both big rings: and when I told him ...


5

Crossing chaining hasn't been any problem at all since the invention of bushless chains 20+ years ago and wasn't even a real problem back in the ancient days. It's a persistent myth that just won't die... Your bike should leave the shop capable of shifting into any combo of gears possible and riding any amount of time you like in that gear. At most I would ...


-1

What your mechanic said, is true for most drivetrains. And there's absolutely no point in using extreme combinations, such as 1:8 or 3:1, as they are doubled by 2:somethings (first number meaning the front gear, second for rear gear). All you need is all 2:x plus probably no more than 1:1, 1:2, 3:7 and 3:8. Here's a ratio calculation I made for a 11-32 ...


2

Are all of those pictures in the same gear? Big in front and 4th in rear? On the picture of the derailleur it is pretty much maxed out giving chain length. Notice it is swung way forward. When you go small small it is the opposite. The derailleur has to take up the maximum amount of chain - swing back. Most likely your derailleur will not take the ...


13

You have a double front, right? The usual advice is to not shift into the highest 3 gears in the rear cassette when in front the chain is on the large chainring, and to not shift into the smallest 3 cogs, when the chain in front is on the small chainring. This prevents 'cross-chaining', which wears the chain fast, produces noise and difficult shifting. ...


8

Not using the upper and lower gears is a very effective solution. Stupid, but effective. Traditionally one would simply use the limit screws (at the rear derailleur, often marked L(ow) and H(igh)). Shift to the lowest/highest gear (front and rear) and tighten the screw so that it only allows the mech to move ever so slightly over the edge of the ...


0

As Daniel surmised, the issue was alignment of the rear derailleur hanger. Some creative bending by my LBS held me off for a while until I finally brought it too close to the hub on a hill and torqued the whole thing into a twisted mess. Swapping in a new derailleur of the exact same type (and new hanger) cured it completely.


0

There is not one place that has an exact list of every bike model ever produced but if you go onto one of the sites mentioned or http://mechhanger.com/ just type inn your bike make and it will narrow it down to a few derailleur hangers to compare. If you are still stuck, send them a picture and let them do the hard work!


1

Last year I found my girlfriend an older Takara (classic steel frame) with shimano SIS components, and it worked fine. Yes, the components were flimsy, junky, and jumped on certain gears, but it got the job done until we could upgrade it. The next year we purchased a Trek 600 (aluminum frame) with all shimano 600 components and stripped it. We then ...


2

If its a low quality bike, you're probably best off just selling it and buying a decent bike to begin with -- there are good used road bikes for reasonably low prices. The first problem is that cheap road bikes likely don't even have cassette+freehub systems -- they have freewheels. High quality freewheels aren't cheap, and you do need a freewheel remover ...


2

I broke a front derailleur cable at the top of a long climb once, leaving my chain stuck around the little crank for the descent. Luckily, I was able to find a small, flat-ish rock on the side of the road that I could wedge between my frame and derailleur in order to hold the chain up on the big crank. The rock shook free once or twice on the way down the ...


1

If the cable breaks at the shifter and you have externally-routed cables, here's what you do: Hand-shift the bike onto a big cog on the rear by pressing on the derailleur as you spin the pedals. Tie the cable around the front cable stay on the downtube. Adjust as necessary to get the bike to hold a gear.


5

"Nothing is so broken you cannot make it worse" - breaking a perfectly good chain in the field, miles from nowhere, with a light weight emergency tool, would be my very last resort. This will only work if the broken end is not too frayed. Remove the cable completely from the outers and the shifter. Thread the cable though the barrel adjuster on the ...


0

They certainly are, and you have different alternatives depending on how much cable you where left with and the available tools. If the cable snaps towards the middle of a sleeve-less section (i.e. between cablestops in the frame) you may be able to tie a piece of wire. This will give you some shifting posibilities but don't espect full functionality, ...


-1

In the method Pete suggests you don't pick a sprocket as you don't have a horizontal drop out. Go small up font and a middle in the back for chain alignment and pick the best chain length. From there you may need to go up or down one in the rear to get chain tension. Is not going to be perfect. But tension and alignment is more important than the exact ...


0

Depending on how many times this has happened, it could be a couple of different things. One possibility is that the clamp on the derailleur is loose and allowing the cable to lose tension over time and stop shifting properly. Another is that if at some point the LBS replaced the cable and adjusted it properly, the cable will naturally stretch, also ...



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