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Thank you for saying it is in the most used, daily range! That helps a great deal. I do agree that it could be cog wear in the rear cassette. A far more cheaper solution, and just as likely is that the cable stays and cables have built up grime on the bottom of the BB shell and are sticking just in that section where they are sprayed with road goop the most. ...


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It currently has a 7-speed Shimano Altus derailleur The RD-M310 is actually a 7/8 speed derailleur. Kind of between the bottom-line Shimano Tourney line, designated as 7 speed, and the Acera 8 speed (RD-M360). Still, just this morning I saw a Tourney on someone's 8 speed commuting bike (one chainring front, 11-34T 8 in the back). I can't think of any ...


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A clutch derailleur does a better job of tensioning the bottom portion of the chain. This keeps one side of your chain more aligned, and it slaps around less when you ride over uneven terrain. People like clutch derailleurs because they also reduce the noise of your bike. The problem is, this added tension doesn't help the top part of your chain, and that's ...


3

"Once or twice per ride" - that is way beyond what I would consider only. That would destroy my confidence in the bike and ruin any enjoyment I got from riding. A new dérailleur might help, but might not. There are other things I would look into first, PeteH in his comment is correct - the number of drops you are suffering is an indication something is ...


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Any Shimano rear derailleur designed for 7 speed (3 front x 7 rear gears = 21 speed) drivetrains and mountain bike gearing will work. For your practical purposes, the compatibility chart from Shimano below gives part numbers for the available rear derailleurs which will work with a 7 speed MTB drivetrain: Those part numbers can be specifically matched ...


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The rear der on that bike will cost you at most $20 US, but if you take what's left of the jockey wheel to your LBS (local bike shop) they should be able to hook you up with a new or used part for less than $5 us.


11

The allen is almost certainly metric. Both 2.5mm and 3mm are reasonably close to 7/64 inch. 3mm is a very common size on bikes. If you are going to do any work on a bike you need metric allen wrenches.


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Just to add one more perspective: I've done this on a racing route full of hills. I swapped out my medium cage 105 for a mountain bike derailleur (Deore 9 speed). I was teased a bit, but after 85 miles I was asked a lot of questions as to how I did this and why it worked. Large cog was 34, and I had no problems shifting. So consider dishing out for a ...


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Of course most everybody has fallen on their derailleur from time to time. * A derailleur has worn out when the play in the derailleur exceeds a certain amount. Falling on it exacerbates that wear. * Sometimes, the derailleur hanger bolts loosen over time, more so when you fall on the derailleur. Check these bolts are tight. * The derailleur hanger (you ...


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I crashed a couple days ago before the derailleur got bent and after the crash, I realized that when I try to shift to the big sprocket stationary, it sometimes will slip off and goes to the back of the cassette: It sounds like the derailleur was already damaged in this crash, causing the shifting to be off. Perhaps the hanger got bent, causing the cage to ...


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I just upgraded from a 9 speed to a 10 speed cassette. All I changed was my shifters and my chain. It's the shifters that determine how much the derailleur moves. The big companies want you to spend money in upgrading everything but that is not needed. I did this on my 2011 Giant Defy that was outfitted with Tiagra group set. I changed the shifters to 10 ...


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Gear 1 indicates the largest cog on the rear. It will be the easiest to pedal and make you go the slowest for a given pedal speed. You want lower gears for slow speed, whether from going uphill, being lazy, or whatever cause. They allow you to maintain your desired pedaling cadence.



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