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One common problem with people who are new to cycling is that they tend to under-inflate the tyres. Too low tyre pressure means increased rolling friction which is likely to be quite noticeable. (At higher speeds the air resistance is dominant, but not really at these speeds.) Exactly how high pressure is a hotly debated question, but as a rule it should be ...


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From the web site that bike comes with 40T chainring and a 14-28T Freewheel. 17.94 kmph is a cadence of only 50. bikecalc.com You should be up at 80+. On a sprint you should go over 100. A folding bike is not as efficient as most full size bike but gearing is not what is holding you back at 18 kmph. Not going to give specific hybrids but there are many ...


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What is your "cadence" (number of pedal revolutions per minute)? A healthy young cyclist should be able to "cruise" at 80-90 rpm, and that would be considered your top speed. If at 80 rpm you're only getting 18kmph (11mph) in your fastest gear then your bike gearing is quite low and you probably need to change something. But many novice cyclists simply ...


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Just a visual supplement to @darkcanuck's excellent description: This image (105 rear derailleur) shows the barrel adjuster, and how clockwise rotation will pull the derailleur toward smaller rear cogs, while counterclockwise (blue) moved the chain towards the larger rings. So, for instance, if you're slipping down a cog, counterclockwise will snug things ...


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http://en.m.wikibooks.org/wiki/Bicycles/Maintenance_and_Repair/Gear-changing_Dimensions Shimano pulls roughly half the cable per shift compaired to SRAM.


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With some customization the partial change is possible. Get a rear sprocket cassette which mounts on Shimano freewheel but is designed for Campagnolo - they are available. So, you can use your old wheels. Crankset, chain, derailleurs must be changed completely, cross-compatibility with Shimano (with chains in particular) there happens but is neither ...


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Sounds to me like classic symptoms of a dirty drivetrain. If your chain is getting slack on top when you stop pedalling or backpedal, then the problem is in your freehub (or freewheel, whichever you have), a dirty freehub will cause all the problems you've listed, even on a brand new bike. When dirt and grit mixed with excess chain oil get gummed up in the ...


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It is also possible that some combination of the chainring, hub, freewheel, is out of tolerance. None of these parts is every perfectly radially symmetrical (ie. they spin in a perfect circle). Manufacturers have acceptable tolerances for being asymmetrical, and the better the quality the tighter the tolerances. If, say, your chainring was out of tolerance ...


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I have seen this frequently and routed my cables this way. By routing the shifter cable from the right side of the handlebar around the stem to the cable boss on the left side of the frame (and visa versa) I create a more gentle bend in the in the cable housing. A gentler bend creates less internal friction on the cable. Another benefit is less stress on the ...


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This is one of those questions that can start arguments between bike mechanics--to cross or not to cross the derailer cables. Crossing appears to be becoming more common on new bikes, if the cables aren't internal, but it's also going to depend upon the bike. Smoother shifting is reported by some from crossed cables. I would talk to the mechanic at your LBS ...


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I've got shimano internal hub for 5 years mainly to commute. pros: no maintenance - at the beggining easy changing at red light or to jump on the sidewalk cons: harder to change tire when flat one day a car bump my wheel: I add to change the whole wheel+internal hub after some time (3000km) some gears are screwed, so it "jumps" when I press too ...


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"The chain also jumps a lot (feels like it shifts gears without me doing anything, then stays on the same gear anyway)." Based on this I'm going to suggest that the cassette is worn (the rear gear cogs). If the chain was very worn it will have worn the teeth of the cogs to the same fit, now with a new chain they no longer align properly. Depending on the ...


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As you have a master link, removing the chain should be easy. My guess - you threaded the chain in the wrong way through the rear derailleur. There are a couple of metal extrusions between the rollers, intended to keep the chain from jumping. With the chain still attached, look at the part of the RD I have tried to mark with "1" and check if the chain is ...


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The spring tension of front derailleurs is not normally configurable. Addressing your difficulty shifting up, have you checked whether the High limit screw is preventing the mech from moving all the way, forcing you to stretch the cable until the shifter reaches the ratchet point? The shifter is normally able to freely pull cable slightly beyond the ...


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Take a close look at the limit screw - is the derailleur actually hitting it? If not, then it's possible that the spring which pulls it to the right is worn out. If that's the case, you might be able to replace the spring, but unless it's a really expensive derailleur, you're better off just replacing the whole thing.



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