Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

At a glance, comparing the Salsa Fargo and Kona Explosif, the Salsa's bottom bracket is lower than the Konas. The Salsa's BB position is more like a road bike. Thus if I were to hazard a guess, the Kona is purpose designed for severe off roading to clear rocks, logs and all. The Salsa on the other hand doesn't need to worry about such severity and can offer ...


2

Aside from touring specific braze-ons (rackss, fenders, spokes, pump, etc), the short answer is that adventure touring bikes are going to be more well suited as an all around machine where as an MTB has a narrower performance mark. The long answer is frame geometry. Briefly looking at the geometry of some of the bikes you listed shows the Kona having ...


1

There are a few designs that could involve rear wheel pedalling, and none of them seems to be particularly advantageous when compared to today's standards. Here are two major ideas: The design which is shown in the picture i.e. saddle somewhere around rear wheel axle - when using a standard frame your position will be very hunched. Yes, this may give an ...


2

One problem is that the design would not be appropriate for technical riding requiring speed. Getting behind the seat to push against the pedals would put you out over nothing, instead of out over the back wheel. The design would be less stable because of that and consequently unsuitable for technical riding. The puts it out for mountain styles of riding. ...


2

Lighting control isn't exactly a good idea since you have 2 lights (front and rear) on a bicycle typically. Most cycling sensors (cadence, speed, heartrate, etc.) either speak ANT+ or Bluetooth these days, so if you want to read sensors, you just need to know how to speak ANT+ or Bluetooth in your chosen language. You can also add a GPS module and other ...


0

Go to YouTube and search "essential mountain biking skills". Its the best technical skills tutorial I've watched. They'll also teach you how to break properly going downhill. For my personal opinion? 60% front 40% rear, and never lean forward. Keep your head high, body low, heels dipped, flex you knees, then slowly press the rear break following the front ...


1

Aside from the other answers, there is one big one: legality. For example, in Germany, you are required to have two independent braking systems. The easiest way to achieve this (esp. on bicycles which have freewheels) is to put one brake in the front and one brake in the back.



Top 50 recent answers are included