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1

There are a few designs that could involve rear wheel pedalling, and none of them seems to be particularly advantageous when compared to today's standards. Here are two major ideas: The design which is shown in the picture i.e. saddle somewhere around rear wheel axle - when using a standard frame your position will be very hunched. Yes, this may give an ...


2

One problem is that the design would not be appropriate for technical riding requiring speed. Getting behind the seat to push against the pedals would put you out over nothing, instead of out over the back wheel. The design would be less stable because of that and consequently unsuitable for technical riding. The puts it out for mountain styles of riding. ...


2

Lighting control isn't exactly a good idea since you have 2 lights (front and rear) on a bicycle typically. Most cycling sensors (cadence, speed, heartrate, etc.) either speak ANT+ or Bluetooth these days, so if you want to read sensors, you just need to know how to speak ANT+ or Bluetooth in your chosen language. You can also add a GPS module and other ...


0

Go to YouTube and search "essential mountain biking skills". Its the best technical skills tutorial I've watched. They'll also teach you how to break properly going downhill. For my personal opinion? 60% front 40% rear, and never lean forward. Keep your head high, body low, heels dipped, flex you knees, then slowly press the rear break following the front ...


1

Aside from the other answers, there is one big one: legality. For example, in Germany, you are required to have two independent braking systems. The easiest way to achieve this (esp. on bicycles which have freewheels) is to put one brake in the front and one brake in the back.


5

There are more factors than just the front brake that contribute to the flipping accident. I myself got into the accident once. It happens so fast that you never have time to lean your body backwards and provide more tractions for the rear wheel like other have stated. I should list some of the factors that contribute to the 'flipping'-style accidents: ...


6

I think you need to separate operator error from optimal mechanical functioning. Mechanical advantage By your own anecdotal evidence you have demonstrated how powerful front brakes can be. In short we have front brakes because they are the most powerful brake. When a bike (or any vehicle) decelerates weight is shifted to the front wheel. Because ...


5

We have front brakes in order to stop. In an emergency stop there is hardly any weight on the rear tire, and the rear wheel has very little traction. In each of these cases, the bike would not have stopped where it did, and there are certainly situations where rolling further would be more dangerous. There is a proper technique which is get back and low, ...


5

So what do we need front brakes for? We need them for maximum braking efficiency and better control of the bike. Your question is flawed in the sense that it only has anecdotes from unskilled riders. Let's see some similar examples of equipment misuse: why do we have a rear brakes? They are not efficient and last time a friend of mine used it, the ...



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