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21

There is an interesting Q&A on independent.co.uk (though it dates from 1995) talking about bananas and tennis... Q. Witnessing players at Wimbledon chomping their way through pounds of bananas between games prompts the question: who began this sporting food fad and are there sound nutritional reasons for the players' preference for ...


14

The simplest advice is: just keep it up. Give your body time to adapt to the new workload you're putting on it, and it will get easier and easier. For drinks, you can buy gatorade powder and mix it yourself at home. $19.49 for 9 gallons of gatorade is way better than paying retail price for a quart at a time. As I understand carb loading, it's not ...


11

A few years ago I ran across a recipe that Team Garmin uses (or did at the time). It's boiled potatoes with a bit of olive oil and salt. If you wrap it up right it's easy to carry, unwrap and eat while riding. I'm not sure how many of these you could carry. I've tried it on medium rides (40 to 50 miles) and they were great. I can't find the text of the ...


9

Entirely depends on the lenght of ride. If you're riding for less than 2 hours then your body already has everything on board that it needs. If you're working for more than 2 hours you should eat complex carbs (pasta, oatmeal) 2 hours before the ride so that they have time to digest before you actually need them. Also eating too much just before can limit ...


8

Real food like bananas are better than processed food any day. Don't ditch old school foods. Remember when they said that magarine was better for you than butter? 30 years later, the find out trans-fats are bad. The banana stands the test of time. Gel packs and bars won't. Keep at it brother!


8

I think that is question can at least be partially answered by whether or not you can tolerate food in your stomach. While having a big heavy meal would probably be bad, having something in there, plus doing some refueling along the ride will help you keep from bonking and also make sure you are not running on a deficit for the rest of your day. I find ...


8

A couple of potential quick fixes: Slow Down A Little If you cycle a bit slower (5-10%) you should find that takes a lot less out of you and it will only add a few minutes to your commute. Take The Bus One Day A Week If you exercise 5 days in a row you're going to feel tired, particularly on the 4th and 5th days. If you work Monday to Friday then try ...


7

The canonical recommendation is for "a complete and balanced diet". Whatever 'supplements' you might need depend on what your current diet is. The recommendations I've been given (I'm 50 and commute 24 miles/day) from a dietitian are vitamin D (because I live in Canada - I suspect that recommendation is obsolete currently while I'm commuting 2 hours/day in ...


7

Yep: Keep doing it. When I commuted regularly (10 miles each way but with a 25 mile "shortcut" in the morning) I had more energy than I do now (though admittedly that's in part because of several medical problems). Get a decent amount of carbs, especially in the PM, somewhere between noon and 2 hours before you depart. Don't try to break any records, ...


6

Granola/Power bars are cheap if you get the supermarket/Nature Valley ones, usually $10 for 32 double packs. Or you can make your own - lot of recipes on the net. Basically melt butter / sugar / honey and add anything oat / fruit / nut like, spread on a tray and put in fridge.


6

Chris's answer is good if you are planning for some serious training/ride. IMHO, if you ride just a few Kms there's not even need for a particular diet, as long as it's mixed and well balanced. I stick to such a regular diet for rides of 50 Km or less, otherwise some tuning (as described by Chris) is needed.


5

Eating shouldn't be an either/or activity, but you're right to question the items and the timings. You should be looking for something slow release before - so the fats in a muffin combined with the slow release carbs in the dough are cunning (my favourite is a jam sandwich - fast release fructose from the jam, inhibited a little by the fat in the butter, ...


4

Another idea: Dried apples. Not the ones you buy at a store, but ones you make yourself. Slice apples VERY thin (an apple slicing machine is good for this), spread them out and dry them in a dehydrator or warm oven until totally, crispy dry. Then place in zip-lock bags. They melt in your mouth, taste like candy, and are loaded with sugar (and a bit of ...


4

No. Dietary supplements are not recommended. Just the all-you-can-eat I-don't-have-to-count-calories cyclist-special-diet of a hearty, big, evening meal. Years ago, when I did a shorter journey than yourself but with a fair amount of free-wheeling/climbing I asked my doctor why I was getting so many colds/feeling-run down. He explained about my immune ...


4

I bike commute and do a lot other exercise, and have learned that it is indeed possible to eat too much before a ride. If I'm going to be biking early enough in the day, I'll usually just eat a very light snack, like a banana or a glass of smoothie or juice, and depending on the length of the ride, have a snack bar or juice box part way through the ride. ...


4

That depends on the type of ride, but generally something not too heavy with plenty of complex carbs is good before a long ride. You want something that is going to release plenty of energy over the course of the ride. Porridge, maybe with yogurt and stewed fruit, works really well for me. After a ride, there's a 15 minute recovery window where you want to ...


4

Bananas and as I need at least 15 characters, don't forget to eat bananas during your ride as well.


4

You should pick whatever bike and style of riding you will enjoy enough to ride, and find practical to do frequently. For some this may mean daily commuting, others may find technical mountain biking more to their liking. Buying a heavy/clumsy bike is counter-productive, as you will not enjoy it, will not ride it as often/far, and will quickly tire of it. ...


4

There's a couple of things you need to pay attention to. One is bonking, that's where you don't have the carbs needed by the liver to process fat. Generally you need to worry about this only for "endurance" activities, which was defined by the dietitian that was giving the lecture I attended as "more than 90 minutes of exercise" at one time. You've been ...


3

Nuts: walnuts? I'm thinking pre-shelled walnut halves (walnust halves may/should be fresher than chopped walnuts). There are about 30 calories per whole walnut, or 185 per ounce (contrast with 96 calories per ounce of sugar): because it's from fat.


3

They are easier to carry than coconuts (although two of you could carry one on a line)


3

As much important as breakfast is the dinner the day before. My friends who practice cycling or triathlon eat plenty of pasta or rice at dinner before a competition.


2

Teff pancakes ... I sub applesauce for the banana portion. Often top the pancakes w/ mixed fruit and agave nectar and have a green smoothie to go with it. This is my long ride meal. I typically eat 'normal' foods on my ride. Alternate between dates/muffins/cookies and sandwiches while I ride. All depends on intensity and duration of course. The biggest ...


2

I am diabetic, so for me the best thing is I start drinking water - a lot actually and eating a few bananas before I ride. I don't touch gatorade... it is just sugar water to me... so I drink water and will eat a banana or peanut butter crackers during the ride if I get hungry. I normally get hungary after I stop exercising and I finish off my morning ...


2

You may be missing out on protein. Eggs, meat, or tofu will fill this need.


2

I'm not a nutrition expert, but I swear by bananas! I have always had issues with cramps and bonking on long rides (over 50 miles). I don't train a ton because I have young children, but I like doing the Palm Springs Century each year. The way to prepare for this for me is to ride my usual 20 mile loop around town first twice, then 3 times, and yesterday I ...


2

I would drink more gatorade or other electrolyte-replenishing drinks, but I'm not sure where or how to buy them cheap and in bulk so the cost doesn't add up too much. I've been using Nuun tablets - 12 to a container, but breaking the tablet in 1/2 works fine too in the water bottle. For a 1 hour ride, Gu gel (normal or Roctane) might be worth ...


2

I really doubt that this is a diet issue. I think it is a volume issue, and it will go away if you keep at it. Taking off one day - maybe midweek - would be a good idea if you are feeling tired.


2

I finished the ACA southern tier just this last month! I'd usually be carrying bananas, sardines, peanut butter, oatmeal, knorr rice sides, whole wheat tortillas & granola bars. Less could certainly have been carried, but I'd usually go crazy at the grocery store. Most days you'll pass by a couple reasonably priced groceries so you don't actually need ...



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