New answers tagged

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I will try and stick to your specific questions. To adjust either type at home is possible, neither is more difficult but have different techniques. On that basis I would say to choose freely, and learn how to maintain the one you own with a good how-to book or online videos etc. Disc brakes do not stop you any faster in the dry, but do potentially help ...


3

There's two different situations here. The first time disks are set up after installation can be a lot of work. The calipers need to be fixed in the right position, which can involve a special tool to shave a little off the mounts to get them square and parallel to each other, then some precise setting of the mounting adapters and positioning of the caliper ...


1

As other have stated road discs are becoming more common. While hydraulic discs will give you the best performance, it comes at considerable cost. New shifters would be needed. Mechanical disc would reuse your shifters. I would put mechanical disc as a cost effective alternative. If this is an upgrade it is important to use road specific calipers. Mountain ...


0

If you are going to service them on the go you'll need to learn how. When you get new set of brakes, tear them apart and put them together a few times. It may take an hour or three, but then you'll know how to fix them. Which is better is really up to your use case. Both will stop your bike when necessary. My list of issues to consider: Replacing a disc ...


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They function fine. Cyclocross bikes with mechanical discs wired to brifters are a common sight in races. However, mechanical disc brakes are in fact inferior to hydraulic disc systems and I wouldn't recommend buying a new bike with a mechanical disc setup when there are so many good hydraulic options out there. Mechanical disc calipers only move to ...


0

I would not try to change to disc brakes. The Late, Great Sheldon Brown did write an article on braking, and it covers things better than I could: SheldonBrown's Braking Article You may want to try a different compound on your existing brake. I have had good luck with KOOL STOP dual compound pads in the past, but shimano makes some good ones too. Don't ...


0

Disc brakes - to me - are easier to maintain than rim brakes. Rim brakes take a lot of adjustments as you wear the pads. The pads on rim brakes have to be given more and more toe-in adjustment as you wear the pads to keep them working optimally. Disc brakes are far less tedious. I will not buy a bike that I am going to ride a lot with rim brakes. Six of my ...


1

In general, on electric bikes, the rear hub is an essential part of the electric motor/drivetrain in order to power the bike and is very different from rear hubs on standard 'manual' bikes. Because of this, in order to have a rear disc brake system you'd need to replace your hub (or whole wheel if this isn't possible) with one that has disc brake rotor ...


1

Your simple answer is essentially correct. A hydraulic system is going to maintain a pretty constant mechanical advantage and frictional losses will be trifling. So 8/7 more force on the rear will provide identical torques on each wheel provided the pad friction response is linear, As pointed out, identical torques won't mean much as each wheel is under a ...


1

All brakes are limited by front wheel traction - you either start skidding or flip over the bars. I believe it is about 1 g of deceleration. So anyone telling you one brake is more "powerful" than another is talking nonsense. A key difference between rim and disk brakes is that rims are essentially disks 4x as wide as your typical disk. This means a disk ...


5

There's also the rotor design. There should be holes such that the whole brake pad presses over a void, and several times in the rotation. Some really poor rotors don't have holes arranged right, so one circle of rotor is plain metal the whole way. This doesn't clean the pad and contributes to bad braking. Thickness is partially to cope with heat. ...


1

I wouldn't put disk brakes on any fork that isn't designed to carry the loads. This looks like a cheap steel bike, folded rather than snapping. This one looks like an alloy fork because its grey but has snapped not bent. Finally here's one based on carbon with all the daggy fibres hanging out. If you're mechanically inclined, either reinforce the ...


2

If your problem is just that you're heavy, remember that things have changed significantly in the last 10 years. Bike manufacturing has taken up new materials and technologies now, so we have high-strength alloys (of steel as well as aluminium) and a lot of parts are stronger or lighter than they used to be. It's likely that 14mm 10 years ago is no stronger ...



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