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0

There are some assumptions in your question that make it next to impossible to answer. Braking is not a static operation. The friction of any wheel is directly proportional to the weight currently being supported by that wheel. As you brake the effective "weight" moves from the both wheels to almost entirely on the front wheel. The harder you brake ...


2

Don't worry about equal torque. The front wheel will do as much as ninety percent of the work on a maximum stop. You will learn to modulate the rear to prevent lock-up. Equal pressure will be fine for normal stops.


2

Assuming the same force applied by the cylinder and the same materials, with the same pad size, the larger rotor will have a larger "lever arm" and be more "effective", in proportion to the diameter.


0

I've made 1700 km before I changed my pads (just rear - front pads are still OK, at about 50%). I had resin pads and now I have switched to sintered metal - so far not too loud, but breaking force is better. I have Shimano BR-M395 hydraulic brakes, and IMHO they are great (not perfect, but in city - more than enough for me).


2

I think the rust on the pad surfaces will go away on its own when you use the brakes. It's probably just a thin layer on the surface. I don't think it hurts the brake disks, since rusted metal is softer than the original metal before rusting. The rust on the backing material probably doesn't matter much either, since you were still able to remove the pads ...


1

If you clean the pads with some brake cleaner and a brush and they just look rusty, it's not necessarily a problem provided your brakes are grippy and effective. If clean them and replace any bent discs and your problems go away, you're probably safe as long as you keep a close eye on things. In other words, if your brakes are grippy, quiet, and smooth, a ...


1

Rust or other build-up on your pads is not an issue if you have enough surface left. Depending on the bran 1-2mm on either side is plenty. If your brakes aren't biting properly clean the pads and rotors with rubbing alcohol. Use an old toothbrush for the pads and a clean rag for the rotors.


2

Rust on the surfaces of the pads & disc could cause extra wear & noise, or if bad enough reduce the effectiveness of the brakes. If there is enough present that you can see residue on your finger after rubbing the surface, I would suggest cleaning with a stiff bristled brush or a kitchen scrubber & isopropyl alcohol (some people have recommended ...


13

These things are called tightening plates or lock washers. Your suggestion was righ in where it goes, here's an exploded diagram and installed photo:


1

My brakeset is Tektro Auriga 160mm front and rear, both of them squeal like a beaten pooch during rainy rides. It is caused by the particles of the pads trying to grip the rotors but because of the wet condition, some of the particles are unable to grip the rotors. Pretty much the same when you rub your wet finger on a stainless steel. It makes a "crieeek" ...



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