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I usually replace my disk brake pads when I have 0.5 mm thickness. The reason I do that is because they can easily be smashed by the jaws to remove the braking material ( which will eventually fall apart ). After that it will result in a friction between the disk and the metal of the pads, which is very very bad. I change the disk when it stops braking ...


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Before you do anything else, confirm that the axle is properly seated in the dropouts. Unless the dropouts are resting solidly on the axle on both sides the wheel will be slightly cocked and it is likely that the disc will drag. Working on a bike stand it is particularly challenging to get the wheel properly into place – you need about three hands to hold ...


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On mechanical disk brakes it's pretty common that the caliper is broken: the spring inside it just slipping when enough power applied (yet this power not enough to brake). It's easy to check it: push the brake lever and look what is released there: the cable from the nut, or the caliper itself jump back. Probably you should replace the caliper. New calipers ...


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Did you push the pistons back into the callipers? Hydraulic brakes automatically adjust for pad wear and the home position of the pistons moves slightly out. When you change pads you need to gently push the pistons back in gently with something like a plastic tire lever to return the fluid to the reservoir, then pump the lever to set the correct level of ...


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Are there brake pads with different thicknesses? No. You need to reset your pistons before installing the new pads.


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Seems like the BR-M445 and BR-M446 are the same/interchangeable, while the BR-M447 uses some different parts, but still has the same hose, so I assume that it is compatible as well.


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Sounds like dirty pads to me, but disks can be a pain to de-squeak. The things I'd check are... Clean the rotors with alcohol, break cleaner or a bottle of ethanol from the chemist. Remove and reinsert wheels. Make sure the QRs are nice and tight, and the wheels are straight/centred properly. Check all the bolts holding your callipers to the frame/fork ...


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I have struggled with this both times I changed the pads on my brakes. I was able to do it by squeezing the clip ends together with one hand and using a needle-nosed plier to reach through the opening in the body of the brake caliper with the other. You can grab onto the back part of the spring between the pads with the plier to help to push it out. I ...


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I've been pulling them out a lot lately. They do come out easily, but only if you have the adjusters all the way withdrawn on both sides. The catch is that the adjusters (at least the ones I'm working with) can start seeming tight before they are backed out all of the way. So backing them off can be a bit of a judgment call. Once you've got them all the way ...


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The "sharpening a knife" sound you describe is likely the rotor lightly touching the brake pad (as mentioned in @Jackson's answer). This can happen if the rotor slightly is out-of-true (i.e., slightly warped) and the caliper isn't perfectly aligned. The sound can also come and go depending on how warm the rotor is. As you add heat the rotor (e.g., from ...


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With disk brakes the disk rotor is attached to the hub and not to the rim so a wobble in the tyre is unlikely to be the cause of the noise. What I'd be looking at is the following: Are the rotor bolts tight? Is the rotor warped? Are the brake pads worn? Is one or both of the pistons sticking? Is the calipar aligned properly? 1 and 2 you can check ...


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when there is a problem with noise and visual inspection, it's best if you could make a video and post it to, say, youtube. But if the wheel is wobbling, you need to true it (if the rim is wobbling, too). Also check if the wheel wobble when at rest, simply by using hand to push and pull the wheel side-way. If the wheel also wobbles, the cone might need to ...



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