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1) Loosen the two bolts, holding the caliper of the front brake. It should move freely sideways now. 2) Hold tight the front brake lever. The caliper will bite into the disc. 3) Tighten the bolts to the point when moving the caliper is possible, but requires a push by hand. 4) Lift the front wheel and validate that it doesn't rub. If it rubs try ...


3

I hate to say it but this is why it's advisable to go to a bike shop, if you're not sure about setting things up. You raise a couple of points: Front disk brake. Regarding your original problem, the rotor should not rub against the pads, period. There should be no contact unless you're actually braking. And when you stop braking, the pads should sit back. ...


2

Disc brakes are reasonably tucked away on the frame and fork and as such pose relatively little danger relative to other components such as the large chain ring (which I have experienced in a peloton crash... Yay, stitches!). If you do experience complaints it would likely be either do to out of date rules or prejudices. In terms of braking performance ...


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I have never ridden in a peloton but I would say they should be not more unsafe than the chain blades that are already on your bike. While riding, the only parts of your neighbour's bike that you would be able to hit should be the handle bar and maybe their pedals. Everything else is far less outstanding than those two parts and you should collide with your ...


3

Unlike car disk brakes, there is not a lot of spare "meat" on bicycle rotors. "Machining" the rotors is not really feasible. If they are worn to the point grooves are causing performance issues, the rotors should be replaced. Sanding them down evenly (without expensive machining tools) will be next to impossible to remove scoring and maintain a uniform ...


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From your link, your bike has Tekro HDC Hydraulic brakes. If you do a google search, there is a video (made by Tekro by the looks of things) which talks about how to replace pads on these brakes. I suggest you watch this video. If you understand it, and feel comfortable doing what it suggests, take the pads out and examine them. Don't buy any replacements ...


4

(within reason) Any disc brake will fit on any bike with the right adaptors. The adapter you need will be based on the size of the rotor (disc) you want to run, the mounts you have on the bike (IS/post) and the brake you're trying to fit. Most callipers will have post mount fittings so require a adapter to fit to any IS mounts. Most frames still have IS ...


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Most likely cause if the disc and pads are contaminated. What did you wash it with? Many cleaners leave a residue. Worst case the pads need replacing. The discs should be well cleaned before installing new pads - Use a solvent such as brake cleaner, methylated spirits or Isoprop alcohol, and rub the discs to be certain no contamination is left on them. ...


3

There are a number of simple things you can do to try improve performance before replacing the brake pads. Check the pads to see how worn they are. Here is an example of a new and worn pad requiring replacing. If the pads don't appear to need replacing you can: Lightly sand the pad with fine sand paper Clean the rotor with isopropyl alcohol (or any ...


0

I had a similar problem in the past, and I also investigated the possibility of brake pads contamination. But in the end the problem was that the rotor was not tight enough. If your bike is new, maybe you need to check the screws of the rotor. Another possibility is that with sintered and semi-metallic pads if you use the brakes for long time continuously, ...


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Difficult to say from the photo. Try this, give discs a good clean with alcohol and if the grip is still lacklustre then change the pads......if that doesn't work then and only then bleed.


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Brake pad contamination is usually invisible. The pad compound is porous and if oil got in your caliper / on your rotor in a big way then it has soaked into your pads. The best way to know if your pads are contaminated is to know if you rode through oil or had some sort of suspension or brake fluid leak. A visual check around your brake caliper and rotor ...


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I agree with @Daniel R Hicks. Those pads aren't terrible, but they're obviously not new either. New pads are cheap, so go ahead and throw a new pair on and see if it helps. It's also possible that the pads are worn enough that even when you pull the lever in all the way they fail to make good contact with the rotor. Are they mechanical brakes? That ...


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It will be your spokes... they will all need tightening (on the drive side at least but get someone to check them all). This can happen if your bike comes assembled from a manufacturer.


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The main question is why are they needing cleaning, as this drives the need for chemicals. If its normal road and trail mud and grime, as suggested in the comments, hot water and a nylon scrubbing pad (even a "goldilocks" type metal one if used gently). If you remove the wheels to be safe, then use a bit dish washing detergent and rinse well with hot water ...


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Disks are way more reliable. For example, I had a bike that had a disk in the rear of one of my bikes, in case my front brake broke. One day it did; the whole right arm hit a tree and disabled it and the disk I was still using stopped me on the trail just fine. I then put a disk on the front since they hit stuff if you are into that type of thing.


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I've had recent experience of glazed Shimano resin XT pads. I can't really tell how the pads got in that state as my use of the bike is pretty standard. I sanded the surface with medium grade paper and rebedded the pads which has restored them well. I think it's only worth doing if you notice a loss in braking power and feel. Otherwise you are just wasting ...



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