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0

You cannot install canti or v-brakes on that bicycle frame. Furthermore, if you could, the disc wheels do not have a brake track for canti pads. As others have mentioned, my opinion is that you should change to a different brand/model of disc brakes. That way you can continue to use your existing frame and wheels. The Avid BB7 are an excellent choice. ...


2

The particular model of brakes on that bike are known to be a maintenance headache, and generally have a poor reputation. Hayes Stroker Ryder w/160mm rotor brakes, Hayes Stroker Ryder levers - See more at: http://www.bikepedia.com/quickbike/BikeSpecs.aspx?year=2008&brand=Giant&model=XtC+1#sthash.hhqp6sSq.dpuf If you like the bike otherwise, ...


1

Frame, fork, and wheels are not compatible. Most (actually all that I have seen) disc wheels don't support rim braking. It is money and weight for the rim surface to accept a rim brake. Also your frame and fork do not have mounts for rim brakes.


6

You would need a new fork in the front to add v-brake bosses and the frame does not support this either. I don't think it's worth the effort on this bike. It's sure not going to be easy without replacing both fork and frame. I think for your situation, what may be a better solution is to switch to Mechanical Disc Brakes. They are much more field serviceable ...


3

This is normal for using different wheel sets. Not all wheels are precisely the same. I have a similar thing with wheels on one of my bikes. Learn to align calipers quickly it's a simple process (with wheel on): Loosen calliper Squeeze brakes twice On third time hold brake in With brake held in re tighten calliper With practice should be about a minute ...


-1

My experience with brake type in the rain is that they are in the following order: Axle brakes (you can have two of them instead of one), no dirt can get to them Reverse axle brakes (you can have only one of them), no dirt can get to them Rim Brakes I have never driven with disc brakes on a bike, but I would suppose they sit between number one and two, ...


4

I've done my motorcycle test and know all about defensive riding techniques - and you apply it no matter what bike you are riding. I ride both rim and disc brake bicycles on my winter training and on my commuter bike. On the winter bike I have swapped out the pads to a softer compound for better braking performance (but not so good for longevity). Even with ...


7

Disc brakes are generally more effective in the rain than rim brakes, but using rim brakes properly in the rain has served people well for many years. You need to feather the brakes to remove the water+crud from the rims. Softer brake pad compounds can also help you brake more easily. Also, having good quality brakes that are well adjusted is always a good ...


3

The delay period you normally experience with caliper brakes is much less noticeable with disc brakes, especially a good quality pair. Even more noticeable is that on much steeper inclines and especially in damp conditions caliper brakes, as I'm sure you've noticed, tend to have an all or nothing attitude when it comes to applying pressure. Disc brakes on ...


1

Yes disc brakes are more effective in rain (and dry). If you should spend the money for a disc brake commuter bike is something for you to decide. In the rain I ride more defensibly.


3

Disc brakes should be capable of locking the rear wheel. If this is a new bike I would suggest it's a set up/ breaking in issue rather than a fault. I'm not sure of the brakes you are running, but guessing they're cable discs due to having axillary levers. I'd ensure : the brake pads are bedded in the disc brake rotor alignment is good the pad contact ...



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