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0

No, you don't need discs. You SHOULD fit decent wet weather brake pads - eg Kool Stop Pinks - and learn how to maintain cantis correctly (because most LBS's can't.) See eg http://sheldonbrown.com/cantilever-geometry.html Also make sure that you are riding tyres with good wet weather grip - it varies a lot. (Schwalbe give honest ratings for their tyres.)


3

That bike is equipped with Avid Shorty 4's according to the description (contrary to the URL). Avid Shorty 4's are just regular cantilever brakes, which are standard on most cross bikes. A cantilever brake looks like this: Mini V brakes are a type of V-brake with short pull so they can be used with road levers. A mini-V brake looks like this: Note that ...


0

I asked a similar question (similar, because people recommended a hybrid): What bike+equipment for a long daily urban commute? The bike that I bought cost $700 after a discount for being last year's model, so it afforded/included disc brakes (and I like it very much). The best thing about disc brakes is that they work: On a steep down-hill, and/or at top ...


7

Typically, you don't need disc brakes on a bike which lives on the road or other nice surfaces. The primary advantage on the road is that you don't have to deal with wheel true-ness as much, and that they look cool. For wet weather riding, they can stop you a bit quicker, but with properly adjusted V-brakes, you can stop pretty damn quickly once you learn to ...


2

$500 is close call as the money in the disc is money they did not use elsewhere. I think you should evaluate the bikes you like at $500 and use disc as one factor. At $500 I would look for upgraded components. At $800 you start to get a lot more disc. Yes you will get disc on $500 bikes and you will get full suspension but that does not mean it was ...


1

I mean it depends on your current component spec, but I would tend to say disc brakes. Good brakes will do wonders for your confidence riding, and will allow you to ride a broader range of trails, in terms of both trail style and technical difficulty. That said, you can get set up with a set of Avid BB7s for a pretty reasonable price, and leave yourself ...


0

Ӎσᶎ's answer was the method I went with. I just got a washer from another hub (I didn't want to use a plain old steel washer from the hardware shop because I was concerned it might be too soft, though that might not be the case) and put it on the axle next to the cone. I did that In January and it's done about 4000k without any problems since then.


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You can buy shims to put between the disc and hub. Here's one example: http://www.jensonusa.com/Syntace-Disc-Rotor-Shims It's really that simple.


-1

You will probably have to go with a seat post beam rack option if you want to stick with the Topeak setup (Topeak MTX is a great setup, my family uses it for commuting and shopping). This will serve you well for lighter loads, and you can move that Tourist rack to the hybrid for the more serious tasks and hauling. All the disk option of the rack does is ...


2

You have the seat stay mounts on the frame (those are the two thin tubes that go from the rear wheel drop outs to the top of the seat tube). What you need is mounts on the rear wheel drop outs. Typically, they are part of the dropout and/or frame. In your case, you have none. That being said, the P-Clips and Tubus Clamps will not be useful. The Tubus ...


0

I have to say I never consider which pads I'll be using with rotors when I buy either. I buy organic for best stopping power and metallic for longest life (kevlar somewhere in the middle). For mountain biking, the weather and type of mud/grit you're riding on is a FAR greater killer of pads than a rotor; you can easily get through a new set of pads in a ...



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